England 25-28 Wales: Five things we learnt

first_imgNothing more to add.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Injury crisis: Scott Williams leaves the field and will miss the rest of the World CupThe injuries also reduce the Welsh squad’s ability to rotate players given the constant increase of quality ebbing out from the squad. Warren Gatland will be praying that the injuries stop. Many more, particularly in the centre, and the Welsh coaches will be forced into picking players that, in reality, probably aren’t up to test standard yet, or passed their peak a few seasons ago. If the cruel run of injuries does continue Wales will find it very difficult to remain competitive, through no fault of their own, beyond the pool stages and could end up with Wales’ campaign looking like a one off celebrity special of ‘Casualty’.Set piece meltdownDespite the win, the frailties at the set piece can’t be ignored. There is still a long way to go in the competition and a scrum completion percentage of 67% and a lineout completion of 77% will worry the Welsh coaching staff. Despite very good performances both in the loose, and in defence, the Welsh tight five struggled against the English front row and lineout jumpers – particularly on middle ball. Many will argue that the English front row weren’t driving straight and were creating body angles that even Pythagoras would struggle to measure, but if the referee doesn’t agree, it becomes academic.Under strain: Wales were under duress at the set-piece in the first halfWales’ set piece will need to improve particularly given the injuries that are blighting the backline. The Welsh backline needs all the help it can get at the moment and unreliable ball from set piece will add pressure to the constantly changing combinations that the Welsh backs have been forced into. Warren Gatland won’t have worried too much over the weekend but come Tuesday morning I wonder if he will be giving Luke Charteris’ selection a bit more thought.Three point deficit. Kick at goalTough call: Chris Robshaw gambled late on but it didn’t pay offThis is a very short point. If you’re three points behind, with minutes to go, in your home stadium, at your own Rugby World Cup, in the toughest group in the history of the competition, against one of your fiercest rivals, in a game that has dominated the media narrative for months, if you’re offered a shot at goal from less than 30 metres – take it. Battle royal: England and Wales contested a titanic battle at the 2015 World Cup LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Remarkable game. Remarkable victoryThis was a truly monumental victory for Wales. A 28-25 win over England, at Twickenham, in England’s Rugby World Cup would be a defining win for any Welsh squad, but the circumstances from which the result was prised made it even more unlikely. The victory emerged from a game where Welsh players were being injured with the sort of frequency that you’d associate with the Pamplona Bull Run – not a rugby match. Wales overcame a ten point second half deficit – rare between tier one nations. The win was also built on a shaky set piece, particularly in the first half where both the Welsh scrum and lineout were struggling. But incredibly, Wales surmounted all of these hurdles.Mission impossible: Wales overcame serious hurdles to register a winDan Biggar had the finest performance of his career. Whether Sam Burgess genuinely knew who Scott Williams was or not, he will do during England’s next video session – Scott Williams’ break in the 37th made Burgess, Owen Farrell and Brad Barritt look they were running for a bus with a swivel of the hips. Liam Williams, in the second half, provided valuable line-breaks and a quality of offloads that you’d expect from a game of Super Rugby – not a flat-out test match. As always, Alun-Wyn Jones, Sam Warburton and Dan Lydiate delivered a rock solid defensive wall and together with Talaupe Faletau contributed hard fought yards.Go forward: Taulupe Faletau grew into the game as a ball carrierThe Welsh pack also defended the English driving maul superbly, which became hugely important during the final minutes of the game – and arguably cost England the game. And of course Lloyd Williams’ Gareth Bale-esque chip to fellow scrum-half Gareth Davies, for the Welsh try, obviously deserves a special mention. But to judge the full impact of the win we need merely look at Gatland’s reaction post game – I’ve never seen the man so choked with emotion.Dan Biggar. Career defining performanceAs Rudyard Kipling said, “If you can keep your head when all around you your scrum is wheeling and lineout collapsing, you’ll be a man my son” Pretty sure that’s what he said anyway. Biggar was courage personified on Saturday evening and delivered a performance as near to perfect as you can expect in test rugby. His goal kicking was spectacular with a 100% completion rate.Game of his life: Dan Biggar shone for Wales with 23 pointsIn scoring 23 points he set the record for points scored, by a Welsh player, against England, in a single game. The near 50m penalty, in the 74th minute, showed a level of calm and composure that Buddhist monks meditate for decades to achieve – something that England’s key decision makers were severely lacking in the dying minutes of the game. Biggar defended his channel solidly, as ever, and his work under the high ball would even have attracted a jealous glance from the likes of Israel Folau and Ben Smith. This was clearly a performance built on the team collective, but Dan Biggar’s individual contribution was hard to ignore. Well played, sir.Injuries have become criticalThe Welsh injury list was merely a ‘talking’ point a few days/weeks ago, but after the England game it has become a ‘thinking’ point – in that it is becoming increasingly difficult to think of any players who can replace those with long term injuries. Saturday saw Hallam Amos (shoulder), Scott Williams (knee) and Liam Williams added to that list. The injuries contributed to three players being forced to play out of position in the second half, a situation which could become a reality during the remainder of the competition – George North switching to 13 is looking like a genuine option. A remarkable game and a remarkable victory was headlined by Dan Biggar, but injuries and a set-piece implosion have tempered any celebrations in Warren Gatland’s camplast_img read more

Rob Baxter backs Henry Slade to bounce back from England disappointment

first_img TAGS: Exeter Chiefs Ready to bounce back: Talented and versatile Exeter back Henry Slade LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “There will be an awful lot of people commenting who’ve not been on the inside and not seen what’s happened,” said Baxter. “I fall into the camp where I don’t really know. Now how the last three months have been is not for me to say, but one thing everyone needs to remember is that coaching group have gone through a lot themselves and they’ve got family and they’ve got people who care about them and to see what they’ve had to go through in the last couple of weeks is not very nice.Facing a tough time: The England coaching staff at training“There is a human element we all need to remember. And I’m one of those people in the camp who thinks England have a lot of time now, there isn’t any rush for them to do something. The Six Nations is a little while away. The players will go back to their clubs for a Premiership programme and a European programme to get involved with and actually the RFU can take their time, make the proper decisions, do a proper detailed review and the right people can make the right changes – if any. Because we can all talk about what’s happened but none of us really know in detail.”Baxter had no issues working with Lancaster and revelled in the level of autonomy afforded him as a temporary forwards coach. He did not wish to comment on the current coaching staff or rumours of coaches being undermined, but insisted that it was on-field matters that really matter.center_img Whatever happens in the aftermath of England’s disastrous World Cup campaign, Exeter Chiefs head coach Rob Baxter has no concerns about his players returning from international duty. While he firmly believes that young playmaker Henry Slade should have seen more action for England before his run-out on Saturday in the dead rubber against Uruguay, he insists that the player will not carry any emotional baggage following his time in camp.“I’ve got no worries with Henry,” Baxter told Rugby World at the official launch of the 2015-16 Aviva Premiership season. “I actually spoke to him yesterday, spoke to Jack (Nowell) yesterday, spoke to Geoff (Parling) yesterday and they’re all looking forward to getting into training on Monday. But rugby players are like that.“I’m not going to pretend I know all the England rugby players, because I don’t. But I know that your average rugby player is a pretty good guy and what he likes to do is get on the training field, run around with a ball in his hands and get back into playing rugby. That’s why they got into the game to start with. None of them got paid the first time they picked up a ball. They loved doing it and that’s why, no matter what they say and what they do, we all know they are big kids inside and they just want to get out and play sport with their mates.“That’s why you’ve got to make sure that’s at the forefront of what they do, and probably if we’re honest that’s what we haven’t seen from this England team during the World Cup. It hasn’t looked vibrant and enjoyable and expressive; it’s looked a bit sad and a bit afraid, a bit nervous. That’s probably what we’re more disappointed about than the results.”Easy going: Baxter believes Exeter’s successes have come from “keeping it simple”Yet while he feels a self-contained style of play has let England down, Baxter has called for calm in the wake of England’s exit from the Rugby World Cup, urging pundits and fans to wait to see what comes out of any probe into why England crashed out of their home tournament before sticking the boot in.Baxter, who was an assistant to head coach Stuart Lancaster during the 2013 summer tour of South America while Graham Rowntree and Andy Farrell were with the British & Irish Lions in Australia, has ruled himself out of the running as a possible replacement for Lancaster. However, while he is keen to focus on the start of the Premiership campaign, he has called on outsiders to consider the “human element” before slating the England coaches. “The squad selection, the formation of the camp, team selection and their performance: that’s how you have to judge him (Lancaster),” Baxter said. “Trying to find issues like ‘is there a problem with the coaching staff?’ or ‘Was there a problem in the camp?’ are not for us to talk about. We should actually go, ‘Well he’s the head coach, he’s responsible for X, Y, Z, so did it happen on the pitch?’ That’s how we should judge him, then we can take away the niggly and nasty bits and keep it about taking responsibility for the team on a Saturday.”For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

Six Nations Greatest Moments

first_img Expand We take a look at some of the greatest moments to take place in one of the best rugby tournaments in the world, the Six Nations. Collapse LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Six Nations Greatest Tries England Refuse to Move At Landsdowne Road, Secure Grand SlamWe all remember the Martin Johnson lining up ‘controversy’ before a tackle had even been made back in 2003. The moment had the effect of ratcheting up the nerves and adrenalin before the Grand Slam decider however England utterly destroyed the Irish in dramatic fashion thanks to five tries including a double for Will Greenwood.Ronan O’Gara Drop-Goal Secures An Irish Grand Slam in 2009 Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Six Nations Greatest Matches The tournament has seen some enthralling matches take… Expandcenter_img What are some of the best tries scored… The Greatest Six Nations XV Sweet Strike: Sexton knocks over the winning drop-goal in 2018 (Getty Images) Six Nations Greatest Tries Six Nations Greatest MomentsWhat are the greatest moments to take place during the Six Nations? There have been last minute tries, pivotal kicks and colossal results to sift through and in this piece we have made our selections for the greatest Six Nations moments ever. Are there any we have missed? Do not hesitate to let us know via our social media channels.Six Nations Greatest MomentsBrian O’Driscoll Hat-Trick In 2000Dotting Down: O’Driscoll scores his 3rd try against France in 2000 (Getty Images)The iconic centre announced himself to the world in 2000 scoring three fantastic tries against the French. This inspired the men in green to a 27-25 victory.Italy beat Scotland on Six Nations DebutNew beginnings: Italy came into the championship in 2000 and pulled off a brilliant win against Scotland (Getty Images)In the very first mach of the 2000 Six Nations, and Italy’s first contest in the competition, Italy pulled off a stunning victory over Scotland in Rome, largely thanks to the boot of Diego Dominguez. In all he collected 29 points on that day – six penalties, three drop-goals and one conversion.Jonathan Sexton Drop-Goal Against France in 2018In Ireland’s first match of their 2018 Grand Slam campaign, they faced a spirited French team that looked as if they had sealed the victory. However deep into injury time the Irish went phase after phase to get into the French half and then Sexton cooly knocked over a 45-metre drop-goal to win the match. An unbelievable moment from an unbelievable player.Shane Williams Scores Winner Against ScotlandHeading into the final 5 minutes Wales had it all to do after getting outplayed by the Scots. However, in that time Leigh Halfpenny scored a try, Stephen Jones knocked over a penalty and then Shane Williams scored the winning try in front of a raucous crowd in Cardiff. Six Nations Greatest Matches Former England fly-half Stuart Barnes turns selector to… Heading into the final match of the 2009 tournament, Ireland wheaded to Cardiff to try and earn a Grand Slam. It proved to be a close and physical contest as Wales continued to rack up points thanks to the boot of Stephen Jones, whereas Ireland had to rely on the genius of Brian O’Driscoll and a brilliant try by Tommy Bowe. Into the final stages of the match, Jones again used his boot to knock over a drop-goal with little time remaining, and yet with a couple of minutes to go, Ronan O’Gara did the same to give the Irish a 17-15 lead.A late Jones penalty fell just short of the posts, the final-whistle was blown and the Irish had a famous win and their first Grand Slam since 1948.Gavin Henson Penalty v England In 2005In a complete performance, with time dwindling down Gavin Henson smacked over a long-range penalty to give Wales a huge victory over England in 2005. The Welsh would go on to secure the Grand Slam. The Greatest Six Nations XVlast_img read more

Book review: the angst and achievements of Ireland’s Rory Best

first_imgHe built a machine out of a cattle-feed bin to help his lineout throwing and, for the last eight or so years of his career, during the season he’d throw an extra 500 balls a week on his own.He never really shook off a reputation as a flaky thrower, in part because of the nightmare of losing eight throws in defeat by the Brumbies on the 2013 Lions tour. Yet as Best points out, his stats overall weren’t to be sniffed at, including a 90% success rate across four World Cups.When Joe Schmidt took the Ireland reins, he asked only that Best hit 30 rucks a game to help get quick ball. It was a task he was well equipped to do.A theme of the book is Best’s insecurity, a desire to prove a point to either himself or to others who doubted him. Among those in his firing line is Graham Rowntree, the Lions scrum coach, who said the decision to pick Dylan Hartley, Richard Hibbard and Tom Youngs as hookers for the 2013 tour was not a difficult one.“I thought he was out of order to be so disrespectful to a player who had been around for so long,” writes Best, who then replaced the suspended Hartley but lived with the feeling that the coaches didn’t rate him.Red dread: Best leads out the Lions at Canberra. ‘The lineout was a disaster,’ he says of that defeat (Getty)Tipping pointMedia criticism wore him down, to the extent that more than once he came close to quitting in the months before Japan 2019.“I’d turned 37 nine days before the Twickenham defeat (last August) and suddenly I felt old,” he says. “I was going to tell Joe I couldn’t play at this level any more. I was hampering the team. I didn’t want to go to the World Cup and let Ireland down. I didn’t want Ireland to fail because the guy who was supposed to be their captain and leader was weighing them down.”Social media is no place for solace. After first being named Ireland captain in 2012, when O’Driscoll and Paul O’Connell were unavailable, one bigot tweeted: “No affence (sic) but how can a fat Protestant like you captain our country?”Final bow: with his children Penny, Richie and Ben after the 2019 World Cup defeat by New Zealand in Tokyo (Inpho)More garbage was directed his way after he posted a picture on Instagram in which his son Ben’s England football team bedclothes were visible in the background. Ben is a Spurs fan and has an English grandmother because Best’s mum Pat comes from Middlesbrough.Best, in fact, could have played for England and we learn too that Pete Walton hatched a plan to keep the player at Newcastle in his younger days and then move him north so he could qualify for Scotland!Neither happened, of course, as Best instead gave heart and soul to Ireland. His book is similarly committed, with perhaps only the chapter encompassing Paddy Jackson’s rape trial – at which Best acted as a character witness – being treated with undue brevity. “My focus was on supporting my friend. I had not thought I would upset anyone by attending court.”Since his playing retirement, he’s been doing TV and commercial work. As for the future, he wouldn’t mind being the scrum coach for Ulster, the club he stuck with through thick and thin even when Leinster and some of the French clubs came knocking.“I don’t necessarily want to pull a tracksuit on every day,” he told The Guardian. “Maybe a mentorship or consultancy role in rugby, or a scrum coach. Or maybe being more strategic in terms of almost being like a football manager.” He has a lot of knowledge to impart.Rory Best: My Autobiography is published by Hodder & Stoughton, RRP £20. Written in collaboration with Gavin Mairs, chief rugby correspondent of the Daily Telegraph, it comes highly recommended. Best till last: ex-Ireland captain Rory Best played his finest rugby in his 30s (Corbis/Sportsfile/Getty) Book review: the angst and achievements of Ireland’s Rory BestLockdown or no lockdown, Rory Best’s autobiography is worth making time for. Only 11 men in history have played more Tests than the Ulsterman and his 14-year international career has provided a wealth of experiences and lessons that he is keen to share.BUY NOW from AmazonFor the record, Best won 124 caps (102 starts) – the third most by an Irishman – and captained Ireland more times than anyone apart from Brian O’Driscoll. The hooker achieved a 63% success rate from his 38 matches as skipper.He was part of nearly all the great Irish days of modern times: South Africa in Cape Town, the two wins against New Zealand, France in Paris, and the Grand Slam at Twickenham.Grand Slam: Best says the 2018 win v England was the greatest Irish performance he played in (Getty)If World Cup joy eluded him, as it has every Irishman since the competition sprung up, the more glaring omission in Best’s career comes with a red hue. He toured twice with the Lions, in 2013 and 2017, but got no further than the ‘dirt trackers’.He was an unlikely candidate for stardom given his early years. Best grew up on a village farm in County Armagh and had an inbuilt reticence at odds with the globetrotting international rugby captain that he was to become.In his teens, the “shy, fat lad from Poyntzpass” received a form asking about his availability for a summer training camp and he pretended he was going to be away so that he didn’t have to attend. At Newcastle University, he played social rugby with mates from his agriculture course. However, his talent couldn’t be ignored.He played a bit for Newcastle Falcons at prop and finished his degree in Belfast so he could join Ulster. Remorseless set-piece work at Belfast Harlequins, under Andre Bester’s stewardship, helped Best become one of the best scrummaging hookers the game has seen.Haven: Best with Tony Buckley and Cian Healy in 2010. He always felt at home in the scrum (Inpho)Off the railsBest can certainly be described as a late developer because his drinking and partying as a young man was far removed from the standards required of a professional athlete.He relates how, after one big drinking session, he forced open a neighbour’s door because he thought it was his own house. His half-baked commitment was such that he asked Mark McCall, then Ulster’s head coach, if he’d be picked for a Celtic Cup quarter-final because he was meant to be best man at a wedding.When Ulster won the Celtic League trophy in 2006 – Best’s only domestic trophy – he was party to some puerile trashing of a hotel room. It proved a watershed moment because at a subsequent disciplinary hearing, he vowed to give up drinking and he was true to his word.Previously overweight and lacking mobility around the field, something reporter Neil Francis alluded to when writing that Best “waddled on for his first cap”, Best shed the excess weight and started to give pro rugby the respect it deserves.Brotherhood: with older sibling Simon in 2006. Best’s weight hit 113kg in his younger days (Inpho)He won Ulster Rugby Personality of the Year 2006-07 and, albeit a little uncomfortably, succeeded his brother Simon as club captain at the age of 24.Internationally, he lost out more than he won in his selection duel with Jerry Flannery. But from his first Six Nations start, against Wales in 2007, Best played in 53 successive championship games over ten years – one shy of John Hayes’s Irish record.And once Flannery retired in 2011, Best took centre stage. Exactly half of his huge caps haul came after the age of 30, when he played his most impressive rugby, and that fact alone should inspire those in the twilight of their career.An Ulster legend: tackling Thomas Castaignede of Saracens during a 2005 Heineken Cup tie (Getty)Technically speakingThe best chapter in the book concerns Best’s self-improvement as a player: his change of throwing technique in 2011, his scrummaging insights, the window he offers into a world of sweat and graft honing his skills. TAGS: Book Review center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS BUY NOW from AmazonFollow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.Spirit of rugby: Best’s last match was for the Barbarians against Fiji at Twickenham last November (Inpho)last_img read more

Plans for up to 20,000 fans at England v Barbarians

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. RFU chief executive Bill Sweeney said: “We continue to work closely with government and the local authority on the return of sports fans to the stadium.“The numbers of fans able to attend, given social distancing requirements, will be significantly lower than normal and subject to final agreement from government.“Local resident and spectator safety is our top priority and numerous measures are being implemented for the events that either adhere to or exceed the guidance provided by the government and the Sports Ground Safety Authority.“A test event will be held to put into practice our operational plans and demonstrate that Twickenham Stadium is well prepared.”Those with existing bookings for the original England v Barbarians fixture will have the first opportunity to get tickets for the rearranged date, followed by First XV members on 7 September. If there are still remaining tickets available, they will be put on public sale from 8 September at englandrugby.com/ticketsFans will only be able to buy tickets that are seated together for people in a single household (including their support bubble). We’re back Our Quilter Cup match against @Barbarian_FC on Sunday, 25 October (KO 14:00 GMT) at Twickenham is now on sale To find out more about the fixture and for ticket information follow the link — England Rugby (@EnglandRugby) September 2, 2020 Welcome back? Twickenham is hoping to have fans at England v Barbarians (Getty Images) Tickets are on sale for the match at Twickenham on Sunday 25 October Plans for up to 20,000 fans at England v BarbariansTickets have gone on sale for the England v Barbarians match at Twickenham on Sunday 25 October, with hopes that up to 20,000 fans will be able to attend.The Quilter Cup match, which was due to take place earlier in the year and has had to be rescheduled because of the pandemic, will take place the day after the Gallagher Premiership final and a week before England travel to Italy for their final match of the 2020 Six Nations.The RFU are working on plans to have up to 20,000 spectators at the match – less than 25% of Twickenham’s 82,000 capacity – but it is still subject to approval.The safety measures that will be put in place include increased staff to manage social distancing, mandatory face coverings except when in assigned seats or eating/drinking, one-way systems and hand sanitisers throughout the stadium. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

London Irish v Leicester live stream: How to watch the Premiership match

first_imgA new chapter for London Irish as they play their first match today at the Brentford Community Stadium. See if they can mark it in suitable style against the visiting Tigers Clawed down: Leicester beat London Irish 13-7 when the sides last met, at Welford Road in August (Getty) VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address, so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Premiership live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPNs and recommend ExpressVPN. It’s easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPNLondon Irish v Leicester live stream: How to watch from the UKLondon Irish v Leicester, which kicks off at 4.15pm today, will be shown live on BT Sport 2 in the UK. If you don’t have a BT contract but want to watch the match, don’t worry because you can still easily watch it online.That’s because BT Sport has a contract-free monthly pass that allows you to get instant access to all four of their sport channels for just £25.Get a BT Sport Monthly PassIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when London Irish v Leicester takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.London Irish v Leicester live stream: How to watch from EuropeIf you’re in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein or Switzerland, you can watch London Irish v Leicester (kick-off 5.15pm) through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN.London Irish v Leicester live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Premiership matches is NBC, with matches streamed on NBC Sports Gold so you can watch them anytime and anywhere.London Irish v Leicester will kick off at 11am EST and 8am on the West Coast.The NBC Sports Gold Pass for rugby is $79.99 and includes coverage of the Gallagher Premiership, European Champions and Challenge Cups, and Guinness Six Nations.London Irish v Leicester live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIt’s little wonder that Sky Sport NZ, with ten sports channels, including one dedicated to rugby, is the rights-holder for Premiership matches in New Zealand.If you want to tune in to London Irish v Leicester from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match kicks off at 5.15am on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offerLondon Irish v Leicester live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to keep track of the many South Africans plying their trade in the Premiership, SuperSport shows matches in South Africa.South Africa is one hour ahead of the UK, so London Irish v Leicester kicks off at 6.15pm on SuperSport Variety 1 and Grandstand.There are various DStv packages giving access to SuperSport. They range from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  Leicester welcome Matt Scott, Jordan Taufua and Nephi Leatigaga back to the match-day squad. Scotland centre Scott returns to the back-line as one of three changes to the starting line-up. Ryan Bower and Cyle Brink, a South African, join the pack after starting among the replacements a week ago. It will be back-row Brink’s first start for Tigers.Head coach Steve Borthwick said: “London Irish are a good side with a very experienced coaching team and they’ll want to start well in their new stadium. We take our lessons from every game and our focus is on what we need to do to improve each week.”Leicester have lost only one of their past eight fixtures with Irish – by 36-11 a year ago in Reading – and edged a low-calibre contest 13-7 when the clubs last met in August. You can remind yourself of what happened that day here.London Irish: Tom Homer; Ben Loader, Curtis Rona, Billy Meakes, Ollie Hassell-Collins; Paddy Jackson, Ben Meehan; Allan Dell, Agustin Creevy, Sekope Kepu, George Nott, Andrei Mahu, Seán O’Brien, Blair Cowan, Matt Rogerson (capt).Replacements: 16 Motu Matu’u, 17 Harry Elrington, 18 Ollie Hoskins, 19 Chunya Munga, 20 Steve Mafi, 21 Nick Phipps, 22 Theo Brophy Clews, 23 Tom Parton.Leicester: Freddie Steward; Kobus van Wyk, Jaco Taute, Matt Scott, Harry Potter; Zack Henry, Richard Wigglesworth; Ryan Bower, Tom Youngs (capt), Dan Cole, Harry Wells, Calum Green, Hanro Liebenberg, Cyle Brink, Jasper Wiese.Replacements: 16 Charlie Clare, 17 Nephi Leatigaga, 18 Joe Heyes, 19 Tommy Reffell, 20 Jordan Taufua, 21 Ben White, 22 Joaquín Díaz Bonilla, 23 Guy Porter.In the thick of it: Tigers locks Calum Green and Harry Wells in a maul against Gloucester (Getty Images)Here’s how to find a reliable live stream for London Irish v Leicester wherever you are…How to watch London Irish v Leicester from outside your countryIf you’re abroad but still want to watch your local Premiership coverage, like London Irish v Leicester, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS London Irish v Leicester live stream: How to watch the Premiership match“A momentous day” for London Irish, in the words of their director of rugby Declan Kidney, as the club play their first match at a new home after 20 years as tenants at Reading FC’s Madejski Stadium. The Brentford Community Stadium becomes the 39th venue to host a Gallagher Premiership fixture (kick-off 4.15pm).Leicester get the honour of participating in Irish’s big day, a match that brings together the two lowliest sides of last season’s Premiership – if you take Saracens, with their huge points deduction, out of the equation.Irish, in fact, have won just once in the past 12 rounds – 22-19 at Exeter on 30 September. They lost narrowly at Worcester in last weekend’s opening round of the 2020-21 season.Leicester, who parted company with DoR Geordan Murphy a fortnight ago, thumped Gloucester 38-15 in round one but have not won successive Premiership matches since October 2018. Their most recent away win in any competition was at Calvisano in the European Challenge Cup last December.No 8 Matt Rogerson captains Irish today as they begin a new chapter in their history. The front row of Allan Dell, Agustín Creevy and Sekope Kepu will be under pressure to put right the scrummaging problems that undermined Irish’s performance at Sixways.New opportunity: Wallaby prop Sekope Kepu, in action v Bristol last month, starts this afternoon (Getty)On the bench, there is a welcome return from injury for Steve Mafi, who hasn’t featured for the Exiles since before the 2019/20 season restart.“Sunday is a momentous day for the club. The squad, the staff and the coaches are all delighted and proud to be involved in this stadium move,” said Kidney.“We are a club with a 122-year history, so to be a part of the move is a real honour. It is now up to us to put in a performance on the pitch to remember the occasion by.” Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Papua New Guinea approves Anglican Covenant

first_imgPapua New Guinea approves Anglican Covenant AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Anglican Communion, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] The Anglican Church of Papua New Guinea has announced that its Provincial Council has “approved and accepted” the Anglican Covenant, according to an article on the Anglican Communion News Service.The covenant is a set of principles intended to bind the Anglican Communion amid differences and disputes across its 38 provinces.Papua New Guinea becomes the fourth province formally to “adopt” or “accept” the covenant, the others being Burma, Mexico and the West Indies. The Church of Ireland “subscribed” to the covenant in May 2011, but its General Synod underscored that the covenant did not supplant existing governing documents. Recent Maori action in the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand & Polynesia indicates that the covenant will be rejected when it comes before the province’s General Synod in July 2012.In the U.S.-based Episcopal Church, the Executive Council agreed at its October meeting to submit a resolution to General Convention next year that would have it state that the church is “unable to adopt the Anglican Covenant in its present form.”The resolution also promises that the church will “recommit itself to dialogue with the several provinces when adopting innovations which may be seen as threatening the unity of the communion” and commits to “continued participation in the wider councils of the Anglican Communion” and dialogue “with our brothers and sisters in other provinces to deepen understanding and to insure the continued integrity of the Anglican Communion.”The 77th meeting of General Convention July 5-12, 2012 will decide whether to pass, amend and pass, or reject the resolution. Convention is “the only body that can act on behalf of the whole church in this matter,” Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said during a press conference following the October Executive Council meeting.The Anglican Covenant first was proposed in the 2004 Windsor Report as a way that the communion and its 38 autonomous provinces might maintain unity despite differences, especially relating to biblical interpretation and human sexuality issues. The report came in the wake of the 2003 election of Gene Robinson, an openly gay priest, as bishop of New Hampshire, a development that caused some provinces to declare broken or impaired communion with the Episcopal Church.Some Episcopalians and Anglicans, including the Executive Council, have raised concerns about the covenant, particularly in section 4, which outlines a method for resolving disputes in the communion.The decision in Papua New Guinea, the ACNS release said, was based on the province’s understanding of the name “Anglican Communion.”Bishop Peter Ramsden of the Diocese of Port Moresby wrote in a letter to the Anglican Communion secretary general that “the covenant might not have been proposed if some Anglican provinces had not acted in the way they did, but recent history has produced it and we believe it deserves our support as a contribution to shaping and strengthening a future Anglican Communion, faithful to our calling to be ‘eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace’ (Eph 4.3).”The Anglican Province of Papua New Guinea is made up of five dioceses – Aipo Rongo, Dogura, New Guinea Islands, Popondota and Port Moresby – and includes more than 100 parishes and about 170 priests. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Anglican Covenant Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT By ENS staffPosted Dec 15, 2011 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

RIP: Trudy Vertucci-Ardizzone

first_img Posted Jan 30, 2013 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Tags Obituary, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Trudy Vertucci-Ardizzone, religious educator and author, died on Jan. 9. Born in Brooklyn, New York, she began her professional career as a special education teacher and clinical social worker. After her marriage to Joe Ardizzone and the birth of their daughter Francesca, the family moved to Southern California and joined St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Del Mar. Thus began a 23-year career as a religious educator whose highlights included serving as a consultant to the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego and the churchwide Office of Christian Formation; and as missioner for Christian formation at St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Lompoc, California.Wizards and Wonders, Trudy’s Vacation Bible School curriculum based on Harry Potter, was published by LeaderResources in 2002 and quickly became one of its all-time best sellers. It was the Children’s Program for General Convention 2003 in Minneapolis. In 2009, Trudy headed the team that presented The Discovery Center for Lifelong Christian Formation at the General Convention in Anaheim. Her latest VBS, The Peaceable Kingdom, will be published in 2013 by LeaderResources. Also an accomplished poet and playwright, two of Trudy’s poems appeared in the 2009 anthology Lifting Women’s Voices. RIP: Trudy Vertucci-Ardizzone Religious educator and author developed Vacation Bible School curricula Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs People Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

Presiding Bishop issues ‘call to action’ on gun violence

first_img Advocacy Peace & Justice, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rev. Dan Lediard says: February 3, 2013 at 10:30 pm I think I’ve a reason to believe in TEC again. So nice to hear the “view from the pew.” An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Mark Fulcher says: Rector Tampa, FL Comments (42) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Feb 1, 2013 Cliff Johnston says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 2, 2013 at 6:05 pm In regards to my thoughts as expressed above I do apologize for the typos. Dan February 1, 2013 at 4:24 pm The culture of violence doesn’t come from the purchase and use of guns. There are 300,000,000 guns in the United States. There are about 9,000 homicides using guns in a year. That’s 0.003% presuming that each homicide is done with a different gun – which is not the case. If guns were the problem there’d be a lot more deaths than that.The culture of violence comes from children having children, not having any family, and joining gangs that promote criminal action to get money and status. It comes from entertainers that glorify violence to make money. A film director like Quentin Valentino makes movies drenched in blood and mindless killing. He is lauded, given awards and made wealthy and famous by the very people who blame guns for what happens when people outside the theater act like the people on screen. He should be condemned, shamed and his works derided. THAT will change the culture. Young men and women waiting until they can support children to have them will change the culture. Gloria Rousseau says: The Rev. Marek Zabriskie says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY February 8, 2013 at 7:25 pm What is wrong is it is a slippery slope and your blanket condemnation of gun manufacturers is a sign of ignorance. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs February 3, 2013 at 12:47 pm It seems that the arguments presented against gun control boil down to the basic claim that “Gun control is not the answer.” Guess what: There is no such thing as THE ANSWER to any major social problem.But the truth is that in every place and every generation there are some downright lunatics who are going to cause trouble in any way they can. If those folks can equip themselves with high-capacity firearms, the amount of trouble they can cause is extreme. In the absence of effective background checks for firearms purchases, any nut case can buy serious firepower whenever he wants to do so. An those folks really will do a lot more damage if they can rapidly fire dozens of rounds without reloading. Our armed forces provide high-capacity weapons even to expert shooters precisely because this does make them more dangerous.Still, a lot more than governmental action is needed.It is true that the vast majority of gun owners do not go around shooting people. They hunt; they shoot on target ranges ; they keep a handgun in the house because they believe it provides them with more protection than risk. But the needed complement to regulating gun sales is to make it harder for lunatics to get their hands on weapons that were purchased legally. Responsible gun ownership means more than just not going on a shooting spree, and organizations that represent gun owners would do themselves and the rest of us a big favor by supporting responisble ownership with education and peer pressure.So, no, the government isn’t the only outfit we should all be asking to address the problem of gun violence. Many other good examples have been proposed. But the government can help this cause a lot, and it’s time they got on with it! February 1, 2013 at 8:57 pm To get around the Constitutional right gun-owners claim to have, I suggest allowing guns for everyone, but tax bullets at $10.00 each. That might cool the ardor of those who have the urge to “get their gun off.” Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events February 2, 2013 at 1:46 pm I am wondering what is being considered to educate those who own guns on how to keep them safe from unauthorized use by those in the home. Is there anything that addresses that issue? Rather than try and stop those from having guns how about requiring them to take a class as part of the licensing process like we have to do to get and keep a driver’s license? Just a thought – Hope it helps. Sandi from Del Mar California February 4, 2013 at 5:12 pm Ban on some weapons would be best optionPoint of View Safety In Schools…The Oklahoman newspaperBY MARYANN SONNTAGFEBRUARY 2, 2013I am a retired teacher, counselor and principal. I am also a wife, mother and grandmother of elementary-age schoolchildren. My 35 years of experience have been in school systems in the Northeast, South and Midwest. And yes, I was raised near Newtown, Conn. So today’s issue of gun violence hits close to home.I don’t own a gun. I wasn’t raised in a gun-owner milieu. However, I’ve had friends, neighbors and colleagues who own guns. I respect the right of our citizens to possess firearms for hunting and self-protection. I do agree with these friends that military-style assault weapons and large magazine clips aren’t part of hunting deer, quail or the like. They’re meant for mass shootings.More importantly, I want to speak about assault weapons and large magazine clips as they relate to schools. Educators are in the profession to instruct and guide. They’re not meant to be armed guards. While I do think that a police presence at schools is necessary, I disagree with arming teachers. I’ve worked closely with sheriffs who were assigned to my schools and these individuals became part of the school family, helping me in many ways.However, one police officer doesn’t guarantee protection from a mass shooter. If a perpetrator wants to enter a school even with locked entrances, he or she can find a way. My concern is that the perpetrator has easy access to assault weapons and large magazine clips. By the time that one police officer can get to the shooter, many young people and staff could be killed. Having an officer in a school isn’t the only answer. Banning assault weapons and large magazine clips is a more reasonable approach.It’s said that schools need lockdown drills. I’ve held too many in my career. I’ve had SWAT team practices in my schools after hours to prepare local police for a mass shooting. Do you know how difficult it is to explain to students that they need to practice hiding in their classrooms from those who possess weapons whose sole purpose is the mass shooting of the innocent? These lockdowns alone scare the children. Principals now must be prepared to protect students and staff from mass shootings when our job is to educate. We need to consider the reasons why these new drills have become necessary.What will it take for our legislators to ban assault weapons and sale of large magazine clips? What will it take for required background checks for all gun/rifle purchases? What will it take for changes in the mental health reporting systems to keep guns from the unstable? And most importantly, is the protection of our citizenry less important than re-election?Sonntag has taught and served as an administrator at the elementary, middle school and high school levels in North Carolina, Michigan, Louisiana and Connecticut. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori F WILLIAM THEWALT says: Jeanne Finan says: Comments navigation Newer comments Rector Collierville, TN MaryAnn Sonntag says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Theron Patrick says: February 3, 2013 at 3:54 pm I totally agree with you Ron. I couldn’t have said it better. I wish more people would listen to you instead of always trying to change the laws and put the government in our lives even more. I remember the old saying “Guns don’t kill people, People kill guns.” I know first hand the state of our mental health care sytem. That is what needs changed and improved. Thanks again for your remarks. February 2, 2013 at 3:23 pm Guns are not the problem. Problems lie in today’s weak minded attitudes and teachings (like this letter from the Presiding Bishop) being foisted on all of us in the Episcopal Church, young, middle and old alike.Why doesn’t the Presiding Bishop and others in our church speak out against the many children murdered every day by abortion? February 8, 2013 at 7:26 pm Spoons kill fat people? Karen Birr says: February 3, 2013 at 4:06 pm Thanks for your comments. Thanks for your service to our country. I don’t care about being ‘politically correct’. What Mr. Jefferson said those many years ago, STILL apply for today – no matter what some say. The Constitution is very viable today and should be protected from those who wish to say that it is not revelant in today’s society. In that case, there are those who say that about the Bible. Then what? Dan Odenweller says: Rev. Dan Lediard says: Craig Foster says: February 3, 2013 at 8:00 am Every time the Presiding Bishop preaches, she preaches against violence. The Gospel of Jesus is totally antithetical to violence. All the above talking points inspired by the NRA will not change that fact. What I read in the posted letters is evidence of idolatry–the idolatry of gun ownership. There is nothing in them to remind me of the God of Love and the sacrifice of Jesus. Let those who oppose these killing machines, speak up, please. May God have mercy on us and our children. Rev. Dan Lediard says: February 2, 2013 at 7:26 pm Evil exists. That is a bold and Politically Incorrect statement. The killing field in Connecticut is at point. An evil man killed his mother, 20 children and 6 adults. Note that I said an evil man. I did not say an evil system, a failed system, the government, an evil thing etc. It was the evil act of a man. His sole intent was to cause the most anguish and go out infamously. Evil cannot reside in an object. It cannot reside in a system. It can only reside in a soul.It is Politically Incorrect because somehow over much of the past century a part of the population has developed the belief that “the government” is responsible for and has the power to protect the individual from harm. To attribute this murder to a single evil man, who is dead signals a failure of “the government” to meet that expectation and robs the people of a target for revenge. A demand that the government “do something” is heard across the land. “If only the government would do ______” then this would not have happened” is the cry and is nonsense.Unfortunately there is damn little that “the Government” can do. The second half of new(ish) belief that “the government has the power to protect the individual, particularly the children, from harm” is not only wrong it is stupid. The primary persons responsible for our own security is We. That does not stop some from trying. The results are many times useless and often worse than doing nothing. With great fanfare the folks at local, state and federal levels as well as corporations and other institutions turned many places into “weapon free zones.” Of course the law and policy that prohibits guns, knives, pepper spray ect. in certain places means nothing to evil.The effect of this law and policy at the killing fields in Sandy Hook is that the courageous men and women that stood up to evil had been disarmed by their own state so that they had no chance of stopping him but could only sacrifice their lives to slow evil down and give the children a few more seconds to escape. But the cry goes out from a few people that we have to do something. They say it is the evil black guns that are the problem. They say it is the 30 round magazines that is the problem. They say it is the Mental Health system that is the problem. They say it is the video games that cause the problem. Nonsense. The gun control initiatives our Presiding Bishop has espoused, like the “weapon free zones” are simply politicians/ policy makers making noise so that they can say they did something. The Mental Health system could use some attention and cash, but not just because of Sandy Hook. Trying to censor video games and/or movies is a fool’s errand.Please don’t say “do something.” Join me and my brother and sister vets in saluting the courageous women of Sandy Hook who gave the last full measure of devotion and praying for the souls of the innocent. (I try to leave the judgment of the evil to Him.) Then proceed with caution, thought and prayer.I suggest that we stop looking for easy answers that do nothing but sound good. A lie is a lie. I suggest that much like we have done with pilots, we permit the staffs of our schools to be armed. In this area like many areas of the citizen’s life we need to get the government out of the way. (Not a new thought on my part, Mr. Jefferson expressed this concept many times and is most often quoted “the government that governs least governs best, because the people discipline themselves.”)RespectfullyTheron Patrick, Commander USCG (Ret.) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis February 3, 2013 at 11:29 am In regards to the follow-up response to my letter by the retired USCG Commander I acknowledge the articulate way you can express yourself. However, I do not concede any point. Evil does exist and I am not referring to the fantasy image of what is referred to as a devil. If evil does not exist, and does/did not creep into the minds and actions of humanity – then you Commander would have had other employment since the military establishments of all countries would have no reason to exist. “Our” United States has become a very sad countey in regards to the continual and increasing slaughter of innocent (and some guilty) people.The sociological reasons are many, and theories are likewise numerous. What is happening now is not a matter of giving up our civil rights to own firearms. This is about doing what we can to at least slow down the increasing numbers of people who are injured or killed. Any military “type” weapon (and not just a self-defense or hunting firearm) has no reason to exist in the hands of ordinary citizens. Just this morning there is a report of an ex-Navy sniper who was killed by another military man who has signs of post traumatic stress issues. I mention this as even highly trained military people and law enforcement civilians have the ability to destroy and kill at will. I was trained during Vietnam how to do the same. My point being that the firepower of military type weapons – and the availibilty of clips and magazines which will hold numerous bullets are just too dangerous to be so readily available. If and when another slaughter occurs I pray that our civilian law enforcement members will not be over-powered; which can likewise lead to our peace officers being easy to kill.So as to not create grounds for a “civil rebellion” buy those who support our military systems I acknowledge that I respect your military avocation and I respect your rank. I also believe we must have a highly trained and well armed military establishment – as evil does exist. Again, evil is not something which floats through the air, attacks people and causes subsequent mental disorders. Evil is something which is natural to the make-up of all humanity. Can it be explained to the satisfaction of all people? Of course not.Yes, my comments were written to hopefully stiir up the emotions of some. By stirring up emotions perhaps some will go into a time of discernment during which the acknowledgement that something (which is just a part of the carnage scenario) must be done – and it must begin yesterday.I too served in the military during Vietnam and I also have a defensive type firearm. Perhaps that possibly implies that I too have some knowldege of that which I speak? It is now getting to be close to time when I need to be with our congregation. And yes, I will read the letter from our Presiding Bishop which arrives yesterday by e-mail. I will like-wise urge our communicants to call our Congressional representatives and voice their opinion. This being regardless of which side of any fence they may be on. I respect your opinions and we do disagree on some issues. But I do believe you to be an honorable man who loves his country, and who also loves your extended family. I do ask: What would Jesus do in this situation? Wilbur Walkoe says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Karen Birr says: Ron Fox says: Presiding Bishop issues ‘call to action’ on gun violence Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Karen Birr says: March 27, 2013 at 5:32 pm MarekI am the NRA. I have been a member for 57 years. To say that I am an extremist is not only an insult to me, but is remarkably wrong, insensitive etc.I am a VeteranI am an HusbandI am a SonI am a FatherI am an AmericanI am a CitizenI am an EpiscopalianThe majority of NRA members (about 4,700,000 of us) do not favor new gun laws because everything you claim as reasonable is actually rather unreasonable and will accomplish nothing but grief for Citizens. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Robert Childress says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT February 3, 2013 at 4:02 pm I can’t really understand your stand on this issue. February 8, 2013 at 7:27 pm It was taken away by evil people not the second amendment. Don’t believe in the devil? February 2, 2013 at 4:33 pm Obama and the Democrats have avoided the issue of gun violence for so long that the interest some of them are now showing will need action in order to be convincing in any degree. Political agenda, or what is taken for such, is reflective – in every case – of moral values, and these moral values are obviously within the purview of the Church. In cases such as this one, in which specific action is urged on the part of members of Christ’s body, the underlying concern is not an agenda, but the well being of God’s people, and how particular actions may help bring foundational kingdom values to bear on public discourse. As a priest, I have a responsibility to those I seek to serve to urge prayerful action in instances of moral confusion and personal and spiritual danger. In any particular case, any of us may get things wrong, but please believe me when I say that what is of concern in this matter is the well being of our children and other innocents, and how our action or inaction, our words or silence, reflect and/or contribute to our collective spiritual health or peril.center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Robert Childress says: April 22, 2013 at 1:07 pm Get a history book!!! The phrase you quote is not from the Constitutiion. It is from the Declaration of Independence. While you are studying history, check out Nazi gun control laws of the 1930s. Rector Smithfield, NC February 2, 2013 at 11:28 am It is never too late to speak up for what is right. The Episcopal Church is not against guns (nor am I) but it is against gun violence. Even if you go the route of blaming “evil” people, evil people can do a lot less damage if they cannot get a semi-automatic weapon.Read again what is being asked:We need legislation that limits sales of military-style weapons and high-capacity magazines, requires effective background checks for all gun purchases, provides for better access to mental health services, and directs attention to gun trafficking.”I can’t see that this is unreasonable or infringes on anyone’s rights. It just sounds like good common sense to me. Steve Grech says: THe Rev. Alison C. Lucas says: Judy Mathews says: March 27, 2013 at 5:39 pm Thank you —Theron PatrickCommander USCG (Ret.) Ron Fox says: Comments navigation Newer comments February 3, 2013 at 7:32 am It is interesting to me that the responders are not responding to the PB’s request. I hear a request for Congress to address gun violence, not take a away the rights of the 2nd Amendment. However, particularly on the streets, the issue is not about legal possession of weapons. It is about illegal possession of weapons used to wound and kill the youth of the inner cities. So other than affecting the profits of the gun manufacturers, what is wrong with a more stringent licensing procedure to stop the flow of weapons from the wholesalers and gun shows to the streets? Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service February 1, 2013 at 4:28 pm There are 3,000,000 AR-15’s in this country (described as “personal defense weapons” by the Department of Homeland Security, by the way). About 350 people were killed by rifles of all kinds in 2011 according to the FBI. That includes the use of single-shot rifles as well and other kinds. That’s a vanishingly small percentage of rifles used to kill anyone. The problem isn’t guns. The problem is our culture of violence. If you want to cut down the number of guns in this country, give law-abiding people a reason not to need them. Sandi Lanzarotta Chan says: February 8, 2013 at 7:28 pm Nice… Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA Stephen Becroft says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Episcopal Public Policy Network] The following message comes from Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori.The United States has witnessed far too many public shootings in recent months and years. Far too many lives have been cut short or maimed by both random and targeted acts of gun violence. The school shooting in Newtown was horrific, yet since that day several times as many young people have died by gunshot.It is abundantly clear that Americans are ready to grapple with the complexities of gun violence. The Spirit is moving across this land to mobilize people of faith to act. I urge the United States members of this Church to call your federal legislators on Monday 4 February to express your concern and your expectation that gun violence be addressed. The outlines of the necessary policy decisions are clear and widely supported: limits on sales of military-style weapons and high-capacity magazines, effective background checks for all gun purchases, better access to mental health services, and attention to gun trafficking.We believe all God’s people should be able to live in peace, as Zechariah dreams, “old men and women shall again sit in the streets…And the streets of the city shall be full of boys and girls playing.” The prophet reminds his hearers that even if this seems impossible, with God it is not. [Zech 8:4-6] I urge you to add your voice to those clamoring for peace. Call your legislators and sue for peace.What you can do nowShare this message – You can forward this message here. You can find sample posts for Facebook and Twitter here.Make an announcement at church – The National Council of Churches has samples messages for sharing with your church, here.SIGN THE PLEDGE – Sign the pledge to change our culture of violence here. Identify your members of Congress – In case you don’t already know who your members are, you can look them up here. Have their names ready for Monday’s call-in day.What you can do Monday, 2/4Call your members of congress – Dial 1-888-897-0174 to reach the Capitol switchboard and ask for your member of Congress. When you are connected, tell the staff person:“I am a constituent and an Episcopalian, and I am calling to urge [name member of congress here] to support policies that will change the culture of violence in our country. We need legislation that limits sales of military-style weapons and high-capacity magazines, requires effective background checks for all gun purchases, provides for better access to mental health services, and directs attention to gun trafficking.”Repeat for your other two members of Congress. February 2, 2013 at 8:20 pm The liberal element of society in this nation, and this church, seeks solutions to problems about which collateral damage is ignored. The end result leaves the honest, law abiding member of the society shortchanged. As a competitor in rifle marksmanship, my venue of choice is labelled High Pwer shooting with a Service Rifle in matches promoted by the government. I’ve lost count of the number of speakers who have asserted that “hunters and sportsmen have nothing to fear, we’re only going after the criminals with their assault rifles,” and point to an AR-15. Whoops, the Service Rifle of choice happens to be an AR-15, followed by an M1A, both of which are to be banned.But it is just a little white lie! Facilitated by a lack of an ethical or moral compass to guide the individual in their search for solutions.The conservative element of society, and this church is equally guilty of failing to be consistent in their arguments, like the inconsistency betwewen opposing abortion, but battlinhg for the death penalty. To the left we oppose the death penalty, but argue the viability of a fetus.With 2500 or more gun laws on the books, mayber it is time for a paradyme shift. Gun Violence, Submit a Press Release February 4, 2013 at 10:07 am I don’t understand the claim that ‘guns don’t kill people….’ People wield the guns, but the guns clearly kill–in fact, regrettably, that is sometimes why people wield them. So, to reduce the killing, let’s have sensible restrictions. By all means enforce existing laws. In addition, since we require our soldiers to pass basic training, and would-be drivers to pass written and practical tests, and both are periodically re-tested for competence, we should do the same for gun owners. And since we register each car to its owner, let’s do the same with guns. In fact, this supports our 2nd amendment rights–surely a militia should be appropriately trained. Other useful proposals have been made. Of course they are not the whole answer–it is not possible to legislate human nature away. No doubt combating ‘the culture of violence’ is useful if it is possible, but many proposals with this goal have been in conflict with other constitutional provisions. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group February 1, 2013 at 9:26 pm I applaud Bishop Jefferts Schori for giving us a formula for acting positively to speak out for action and for voting for a change in our country’s gun laws. While some choose to blame death by guns on TV, on games, society, and on poor parenting, the killing goes on — and on.The number of Episcopalians who are able to respond CAN surely make a difference. The elected representatives have to depend on votes. We vote, and we can remind them of that fact. Rector Albany, NY Katerina Whitley says: Steve Grech says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Shari Derby says: Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing February 2, 2013 at 6:00 pm The following represents my opinions and I do not profess to speak for the Episcopal Church. I am fed up with those who cannot, or will not, be willing to make any compromises when it comes to taking action against the horrific slaughter of our fellow citizens, and the lives of our innocent children and grand-children. Again and again we must ask ourselves very fair questions: Where is God in all of this? What does it seriously mean to profess to be a Christian? What does Christianity teach us as it’s most very basic concepts? Jesus was willing to walk to his death as he would not give in on what he knew to be the “better ways of living.” Those ways are of God. For those who profess to be Christian may we also include the ways of Jesus the Christ. I am reminded time and time again of the story of the Greatest Commandment. Let us assume you who are reading this know how the story unfolds? We told to love all people as God loves us. Then why are millions not willing to make any type of love-based comprose when it comes to saving lives? The next victims could just as easily be your own famly members. No where are we immune to violence. Are you who grab your firearms and yell loudly that you will not give up your constitutional rights even willing to sit and listen to those who you perceive to be your enemy? Those who support some kinds of changes are not your enemy. Often we are our own worst enemy. Millions of us are also armed citizens, who try to use love, compassion, Christian ethics as we perceive them, and the common sense process of attempting to being pragmatic. We are all in this together and those who are trying to find and create ways to lesson the numbers of maniacal killings deserve to be listened to; just as we must respect your dignity by listening to your opinions. However, no-one of will be able accomplish anything if respect and dignity are not “lovingly” given to each other. What does it mean to resist ANY TYPE of weapons reform? What is truly behind the angry words of “No!” – to any compormise? Is it sometimes fear? If we live in fear then we cannot make good decisions. The person who wrote the editorial above mine speaks of evil people. Just who is evil and who defines what evil is? The potential evilness of humanity is often demonstrated by those who profess to be the experts about evil. The concept of: “those people over there are the really evil one’s” just doesn’t cut it. To progress we must seriously look within and use the mindset of Jesus when looking at our own opinions. Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY February 6, 2013 at 9:48 am Presiding Bishop Katherine Jeffords-Schori ‘call in action on gun violence’ is very misguided. It reflects the Obama-Feinstein position that has been so well publicized by the ‘in the tank’ media that inundates all of us. Many have naively responded supporting PB Schori’s position. The real need for ‘action on gun violence’ needs to be focused on the Obama administration itself. Where was the concern of PB Schori and others during the “Fast and Furious” debacle where large numbers of weapons were willingly supplied by the U.S. Government to Mexican Drug Cartels? This U.S. Government (aka Obama administration) was responsible for the deaths literally thousand of people in Mexico along with Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry. The silence is deafening.Where is the concern about potential for future wide spread violence from the current U. S. Government administration? There is silence on Homeland Security acquiring 7,000 select fire ARs (that the kind that has real full automatic capability). There is also silence about the acquisition of 1.7 billion (that’s right…billion) rounds of hollow point ammunition by Homeland Security.Is this part of some genocidal plan?The “ gun control plan” by Obama/Feinstein and supported by PB Schori, et. al. is nothing but a ruse for eventual confiscation followed by a total and complete ban of firearms from the American public. Jews for the Preservation of Firearms Ownership web site (http://www.jpfo.net/) is replete with the horrible and chilling results of gun control. No one can dispute these well documented historical examples.(Please see http://jpfo.net/pdf02/genocide-chart.pdf for The JPFO Genocide Chart.)The following is a disturbing quote form the above referenced website:“…… Hatred + Government + Disarmed Civilians = GenocideWhat makes the argument so powerful? Two factors. First, it makes common sense: unarmed defenseless people have no hope against armed aggressors. Second, it states the historical truth: evil governments did wipe out 170,000,000 innocent non-military lives in the 20th Century alone.. ……When the gun prohibitionists quote a statistic about how many people are killed by firearms misuse, the discussion sometimes bogs down into whose crime statistics to believe and how to count crimes vs. the defensive firearm uses.In the 20th Century:Governments murdered four times as many civilians as were killed in all the international and domestic wars combined.• Governments murdered millions more people than were killed by common criminals.How could governments kill so many people? The governments had the power – and the people, the victims, were unable to resist. The victims were unarmed.”The “gun control” put forth by Obama/Feinstein and supported by PB Schori et. al. clearly hearkens back to Nazi Weapons Law of 1938. How well did this work for German democracy? Gun Control leading to genocide is the worst kind of hatred and evil.Anything having to do with the Nazi era has no place this country or in any church. It is the worst kind of hatred and certainly is contrary to orthodox Christian teaching. Of course though, the Reichskirche did support the Nazi Government in the 1930s and in WWII, Makes you wonder, doesn’t it?PB Schori’s remarks only reference gun violence. Why? Should not this be a statement about all violence in society? Obviously absent from PB Schori’s statement was any remark about the Good News of the Gospel. Bringing the love of Jesus Christ to the hearts of the people is the real way to address the issue of violence. That is the real essence of the church. I wish PB Schori would comment on that. February 6, 2013 at 12:21 am The constitution also states the people have a right to life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness. That was all taken away from twenty seven children and adults by one person exercising the right to bear arms and another mentally unstable person with access to those firearms. February 2, 2013 at 2:01 pm I support the statements of the presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church.2 / 2 / 2013.Rev. Alison C. Lucas Steve Grech says: Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET David S. Halsted, M.D., F.A.C.S. says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC February 2, 2013 at 3:54 pm Citizens of the United States are 15 times more likely to be shot than citizens of any other developed country in the world! Each year 100,000 Americans are shot by guns and 30,000 die as a result. Every two years, more Americans die from gunfire than were killed in Vietnam, but they have no monument, and we have come to accept this as the cost for living in our country. This is insanity! Gun fire is the number one killer of children in our country. More children die from guns than cancer. Yet, we have placed more restrictions on toy guns than real guns. Do we not care to protect our children? It is clear that allowing our citizens to purchase any weapon and as many weapons as they like is not increasing our freedoms or making us safer. It is making us more vulernable and limiting our freedom to move about in safety. The Second Amendment has been grossly distorted. It allows for the right to bear arms so that a militia can be formed. We now have a strong miltary that makes this far less relevant as a measure. Most importantly, it does not state that we have a right to buy any kind of weapon that we desire or to be free to purchase military assault weapons or an unlimited supply of weapons and high capacity magazines. We cannot obtain a drivers license without going through a careful process. This isn’t the government trying to restrict our rights, but the government acknowleding that driving a car entails responsibilties and can be dangerous to the driver and to others. The same is true for owning a weapon. It should involve background checks and demands that we have taken a course to use it responsibly. Handguns pose the number threat among guns in our nation, and action must be taken to limit the widespread trafficking by straw buyers. What is now clear is that the NRA is an extremist organization that is little more than a front for the gun manufacturers and ammunition makers. The majority of NRA members support responsible gun restrictions, but the NRA supports ZERO gun restrictions. Go figure! Does this sound intilligent, safe or respectful of human life? The NRA has bought our politicians and scarred them to death about taking any action to make our country safer. It is wonderful to see our Presiding Bishop and other bishops and church leaders speaking out. The majority of Americans want stronger measures taken to insure a reduction of gun violence in our country. This won’t happen unless we demand our elected public servants to be less concerned about re-election and more concerned about protection of our citizenry. We also need to speak about and address the glorification of violence in our films, television programs and video games as well as do more to identify, care for and treat those who are mentally disturbed and could pose a harm to themselves and to others. For too long the Church has majored in minor issues. Working together to reduce gun violence in our society is a major issue that sane people expect our churches to champion. If not, how can we possibly claim to follow the Prince of Peace, when we buy into a culture of violence. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Theron Patrick says: Ron Fox says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Theron Patrick says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Steve Grech says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA February 1, 2013 at 4:12 pm I am an Episcopalian. What I see is that the problem is not one of gun violence anymore than the problem of 10,000 people killed every year by drunk drivers is one of car violence. The issue is not the tool, it’s violence. Mental health treatment and punishment of gun traffickers are great ideas, they actually attack the root of the problem.But none of these recent shootings would have been stopped by background checks – the purchasers of the guns they used either passed or would have passed them, and the gang members who are using guns to kill people in the streets of Chicago and elsewhere don’t get their guns from people who are going to run background checks. “Military-style weapons” aren’t really military weapons and aren’t really the issue – any semi-automatic weapon will serve for what they are doing, and no one is going to be saved by the second or two it takes to swap out a magazine.What will solve this issue is to condemn violence and the entertainers and culture that glorify it. We let them change the culture. We need to change it back. The Church needs to point out what is wrong with the culture and fight against it, not adopt it or be co-opted by it as we so often have. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab February 1, 2013 at 5:11 pm …the problem is, many churches don’t know how to teach right from wrong, and don’t even teach that there is right and wrong, including the Episcopal Church. They are too hung up on pushing political agenda. Why did the Presiding Bishop wait till now to speak against “violence”? (…though really she is speaking against law-abiding gun-owning citizens.) Because that’s what Obama and the Democrats are doing now. The problem is evil people, not people’s guns… but the Episcopal Church doesn’t understand that concept. Not anymore.Stand on the Foundation, and don’t snuggle up to politicians, and I might visit your church once in a while. You might speak with authority. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more

Bishop Pierre Whalon’s statement on the pope’s resignation

first_img Statement on the retirement of Pope Benedict XVI by the Rt. Rev. Pierre Whalon, bishop in charge of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in EuropeWe should salute the courageous decision of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI de retire and leave the See of Peter to another man. As he was beginning to show signs of his age, many feared reliving the last years of his predecessor. Clearly, Benedict XVI felt the same way. His resignation is therefore a relief for us all, including himself. With this very modern gesture, he is giving his successors an example to follow.Every time that I had the honor to meet Benedict, what struck me the most, besides the power of his intellect which has not weakened, is the humility and simplicity of this man, who never failed to be interested in those around him, great and small. I salute this courageous man, and I pray that the Lord will grant him a peaceful retirement, and perhaps the leisure to write more important books that will embellish an already imposing opus.Déclaration au moment de la démission du Pape Benoît XVI, par Monseigneur Pierre Whalon, Évêque chargé des Églises Épiscopales en EuropeNous devons saluer la décision courageuse de Sa Sainteté le Pape Benoît XVI de prendre sa retraite et laisser le siège de Pierre à un autre. Alors qu’il commençait à montrer des signes de son âge, beaucoup craignaient revivre les dernières années de son prédécesseur. Il est évident que Benoît XVI éprouvait aussi le même sentiment. Donc sa démission est un soulagement pour nous tous, et lui aussi. De ce geste bien moderne, il donne à ses successeurs l’exemple à suivre.Chaque fois que j’ai eu l’honneur de le rencontrer, ce qui m’a frappé le plus, en outre de la puissance de son intellect qui n’a pas faibli, c’est l’humilité et la simplicité de cet homme, qui ne manquait jamais de s’intéresser aux autres, les petits autant que les grands. Je salue cet homme courageux, et je prie que le Seigneur lui accorde une retraite paisible, et peut-être le loisir d’écrire encore d’autres livres importants qui embelliront une œuvre déjà imposante. Posted Feb 14, 2013 Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Ecumenical & Interreligious, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (1) Joyce Ann Edmondson says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Pope Resigns February 15, 2013 at 9:56 am Rt. Rev. Pierre Whalon, bishop in charge of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in EuropeI salute you for your thoughtful and gracious statements. It is so encouraging to see members of different denominations reflecting their “oneness” in such statements. Peace be with you. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Pierre Whalon’s statement on the pope’s resignation The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more