Papua New Guinea approves Anglican Covenant

first_imgPapua New Guinea approves Anglican Covenant AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Anglican Communion, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] The Anglican Church of Papua New Guinea has announced that its Provincial Council has “approved and accepted” the Anglican Covenant, according to an article on the Anglican Communion News Service.The covenant is a set of principles intended to bind the Anglican Communion amid differences and disputes across its 38 provinces.Papua New Guinea becomes the fourth province formally to “adopt” or “accept” the covenant, the others being Burma, Mexico and the West Indies. The Church of Ireland “subscribed” to the covenant in May 2011, but its General Synod underscored that the covenant did not supplant existing governing documents. Recent Maori action in the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand & Polynesia indicates that the covenant will be rejected when it comes before the province’s General Synod in July 2012.In the U.S.-based Episcopal Church, the Executive Council agreed at its October meeting to submit a resolution to General Convention next year that would have it state that the church is “unable to adopt the Anglican Covenant in its present form.”The resolution also promises that the church will “recommit itself to dialogue with the several provinces when adopting innovations which may be seen as threatening the unity of the communion” and commits to “continued participation in the wider councils of the Anglican Communion” and dialogue “with our brothers and sisters in other provinces to deepen understanding and to insure the continued integrity of the Anglican Communion.”The 77th meeting of General Convention July 5-12, 2012 will decide whether to pass, amend and pass, or reject the resolution. Convention is “the only body that can act on behalf of the whole church in this matter,” Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said during a press conference following the October Executive Council meeting.The Anglican Covenant first was proposed in the 2004 Windsor Report as a way that the communion and its 38 autonomous provinces might maintain unity despite differences, especially relating to biblical interpretation and human sexuality issues. The report came in the wake of the 2003 election of Gene Robinson, an openly gay priest, as bishop of New Hampshire, a development that caused some provinces to declare broken or impaired communion with the Episcopal Church.Some Episcopalians and Anglicans, including the Executive Council, have raised concerns about the covenant, particularly in section 4, which outlines a method for resolving disputes in the communion.The decision in Papua New Guinea, the ACNS release said, was based on the province’s understanding of the name “Anglican Communion.”Bishop Peter Ramsden of the Diocese of Port Moresby wrote in a letter to the Anglican Communion secretary general that “the covenant might not have been proposed if some Anglican provinces had not acted in the way they did, but recent history has produced it and we believe it deserves our support as a contribution to shaping and strengthening a future Anglican Communion, faithful to our calling to be ‘eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace’ (Eph 4.3).”The Anglican Province of Papua New Guinea is made up of five dioceses – Aipo Rongo, Dogura, New Guinea Islands, Popondota and Port Moresby – and includes more than 100 parishes and about 170 priests. 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Presiding Bishop issues ‘call to action’ on gun violence

first_img Advocacy Peace & Justice, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rev. Dan Lediard says: February 3, 2013 at 10:30 pm I think I’ve a reason to believe in TEC again. So nice to hear the “view from the pew.” An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Mark Fulcher says: Rector Tampa, FL Comments (42) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Feb 1, 2013 Cliff Johnston says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 2, 2013 at 6:05 pm In regards to my thoughts as expressed above I do apologize for the typos. Dan February 1, 2013 at 4:24 pm The culture of violence doesn’t come from the purchase and use of guns. There are 300,000,000 guns in the United States. There are about 9,000 homicides using guns in a year. That’s 0.003% presuming that each homicide is done with a different gun – which is not the case. If guns were the problem there’d be a lot more deaths than that.The culture of violence comes from children having children, not having any family, and joining gangs that promote criminal action to get money and status. It comes from entertainers that glorify violence to make money. A film director like Quentin Valentino makes movies drenched in blood and mindless killing. He is lauded, given awards and made wealthy and famous by the very people who blame guns for what happens when people outside the theater act like the people on screen. He should be condemned, shamed and his works derided. THAT will change the culture. Young men and women waiting until they can support children to have them will change the culture. Gloria Rousseau says: The Rev. Marek Zabriskie says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY February 8, 2013 at 7:25 pm What is wrong is it is a slippery slope and your blanket condemnation of gun manufacturers is a sign of ignorance. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs February 3, 2013 at 12:47 pm It seems that the arguments presented against gun control boil down to the basic claim that “Gun control is not the answer.” Guess what: There is no such thing as THE ANSWER to any major social problem.But the truth is that in every place and every generation there are some downright lunatics who are going to cause trouble in any way they can. If those folks can equip themselves with high-capacity firearms, the amount of trouble they can cause is extreme. In the absence of effective background checks for firearms purchases, any nut case can buy serious firepower whenever he wants to do so. An those folks really will do a lot more damage if they can rapidly fire dozens of rounds without reloading. Our armed forces provide high-capacity weapons even to expert shooters precisely because this does make them more dangerous.Still, a lot more than governmental action is needed.It is true that the vast majority of gun owners do not go around shooting people. They hunt; they shoot on target ranges ; they keep a handgun in the house because they believe it provides them with more protection than risk. But the needed complement to regulating gun sales is to make it harder for lunatics to get their hands on weapons that were purchased legally. Responsible gun ownership means more than just not going on a shooting spree, and organizations that represent gun owners would do themselves and the rest of us a big favor by supporting responisble ownership with education and peer pressure.So, no, the government isn’t the only outfit we should all be asking to address the problem of gun violence. Many other good examples have been proposed. But the government can help this cause a lot, and it’s time they got on with it! February 1, 2013 at 8:57 pm To get around the Constitutional right gun-owners claim to have, I suggest allowing guns for everyone, but tax bullets at $10.00 each. That might cool the ardor of those who have the urge to “get their gun off.” Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events February 2, 2013 at 1:46 pm I am wondering what is being considered to educate those who own guns on how to keep them safe from unauthorized use by those in the home. Is there anything that addresses that issue? Rather than try and stop those from having guns how about requiring them to take a class as part of the licensing process like we have to do to get and keep a driver’s license? Just a thought – Hope it helps. Sandi from Del Mar California February 4, 2013 at 5:12 pm Ban on some weapons would be best optionPoint of View Safety In Schools…The Oklahoman newspaperBY MARYANN SONNTAGFEBRUARY 2, 2013I am a retired teacher, counselor and principal. I am also a wife, mother and grandmother of elementary-age schoolchildren. My 35 years of experience have been in school systems in the Northeast, South and Midwest. And yes, I was raised near Newtown, Conn. So today’s issue of gun violence hits close to home.I don’t own a gun. I wasn’t raised in a gun-owner milieu. However, I’ve had friends, neighbors and colleagues who own guns. I respect the right of our citizens to possess firearms for hunting and self-protection. I do agree with these friends that military-style assault weapons and large magazine clips aren’t part of hunting deer, quail or the like. They’re meant for mass shootings.More importantly, I want to speak about assault weapons and large magazine clips as they relate to schools. Educators are in the profession to instruct and guide. They’re not meant to be armed guards. While I do think that a police presence at schools is necessary, I disagree with arming teachers. I’ve worked closely with sheriffs who were assigned to my schools and these individuals became part of the school family, helping me in many ways.However, one police officer doesn’t guarantee protection from a mass shooter. If a perpetrator wants to enter a school even with locked entrances, he or she can find a way. My concern is that the perpetrator has easy access to assault weapons and large magazine clips. By the time that one police officer can get to the shooter, many young people and staff could be killed. Having an officer in a school isn’t the only answer. Banning assault weapons and large magazine clips is a more reasonable approach.It’s said that schools need lockdown drills. I’ve held too many in my career. I’ve had SWAT team practices in my schools after hours to prepare local police for a mass shooting. Do you know how difficult it is to explain to students that they need to practice hiding in their classrooms from those who possess weapons whose sole purpose is the mass shooting of the innocent? These lockdowns alone scare the children. Principals now must be prepared to protect students and staff from mass shootings when our job is to educate. We need to consider the reasons why these new drills have become necessary.What will it take for our legislators to ban assault weapons and sale of large magazine clips? What will it take for required background checks for all gun/rifle purchases? What will it take for changes in the mental health reporting systems to keep guns from the unstable? And most importantly, is the protection of our citizenry less important than re-election?Sonntag has taught and served as an administrator at the elementary, middle school and high school levels in North Carolina, Michigan, Louisiana and Connecticut. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori F WILLIAM THEWALT says: Jeanne Finan says: Comments navigation Newer comments Rector Collierville, TN MaryAnn Sonntag says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Theron Patrick says: February 3, 2013 at 3:54 pm I totally agree with you Ron. I couldn’t have said it better. I wish more people would listen to you instead of always trying to change the laws and put the government in our lives even more. I remember the old saying “Guns don’t kill people, People kill guns.” I know first hand the state of our mental health care sytem. That is what needs changed and improved. Thanks again for your remarks. February 2, 2013 at 3:23 pm Guns are not the problem. Problems lie in today’s weak minded attitudes and teachings (like this letter from the Presiding Bishop) being foisted on all of us in the Episcopal Church, young, middle and old alike.Why doesn’t the Presiding Bishop and others in our church speak out against the many children murdered every day by abortion? February 8, 2013 at 7:26 pm Spoons kill fat people? Karen Birr says: February 3, 2013 at 4:06 pm Thanks for your comments. Thanks for your service to our country. I don’t care about being ‘politically correct’. What Mr. Jefferson said those many years ago, STILL apply for today – no matter what some say. The Constitution is very viable today and should be protected from those who wish to say that it is not revelant in today’s society. In that case, there are those who say that about the Bible. Then what? Dan Odenweller says: Rev. Dan Lediard says: Craig Foster says: February 3, 2013 at 8:00 am Every time the Presiding Bishop preaches, she preaches against violence. The Gospel of Jesus is totally antithetical to violence. All the above talking points inspired by the NRA will not change that fact. What I read in the posted letters is evidence of idolatry–the idolatry of gun ownership. There is nothing in them to remind me of the God of Love and the sacrifice of Jesus. Let those who oppose these killing machines, speak up, please. May God have mercy on us and our children. Rev. Dan Lediard says: February 2, 2013 at 7:26 pm Evil exists. That is a bold and Politically Incorrect statement. The killing field in Connecticut is at point. An evil man killed his mother, 20 children and 6 adults. Note that I said an evil man. I did not say an evil system, a failed system, the government, an evil thing etc. It was the evil act of a man. His sole intent was to cause the most anguish and go out infamously. Evil cannot reside in an object. It cannot reside in a system. It can only reside in a soul.It is Politically Incorrect because somehow over much of the past century a part of the population has developed the belief that “the government” is responsible for and has the power to protect the individual from harm. To attribute this murder to a single evil man, who is dead signals a failure of “the government” to meet that expectation and robs the people of a target for revenge. A demand that the government “do something” is heard across the land. “If only the government would do ______” then this would not have happened” is the cry and is nonsense.Unfortunately there is damn little that “the Government” can do. The second half of new(ish) belief that “the government has the power to protect the individual, particularly the children, from harm” is not only wrong it is stupid. The primary persons responsible for our own security is We. That does not stop some from trying. The results are many times useless and often worse than doing nothing. With great fanfare the folks at local, state and federal levels as well as corporations and other institutions turned many places into “weapon free zones.” Of course the law and policy that prohibits guns, knives, pepper spray ect. in certain places means nothing to evil.The effect of this law and policy at the killing fields in Sandy Hook is that the courageous men and women that stood up to evil had been disarmed by their own state so that they had no chance of stopping him but could only sacrifice their lives to slow evil down and give the children a few more seconds to escape. But the cry goes out from a few people that we have to do something. They say it is the evil black guns that are the problem. They say it is the 30 round magazines that is the problem. They say it is the Mental Health system that is the problem. They say it is the video games that cause the problem. Nonsense. The gun control initiatives our Presiding Bishop has espoused, like the “weapon free zones” are simply politicians/ policy makers making noise so that they can say they did something. The Mental Health system could use some attention and cash, but not just because of Sandy Hook. Trying to censor video games and/or movies is a fool’s errand.Please don’t say “do something.” Join me and my brother and sister vets in saluting the courageous women of Sandy Hook who gave the last full measure of devotion and praying for the souls of the innocent. (I try to leave the judgment of the evil to Him.) Then proceed with caution, thought and prayer.I suggest that we stop looking for easy answers that do nothing but sound good. A lie is a lie. I suggest that much like we have done with pilots, we permit the staffs of our schools to be armed. In this area like many areas of the citizen’s life we need to get the government out of the way. (Not a new thought on my part, Mr. Jefferson expressed this concept many times and is most often quoted “the government that governs least governs best, because the people discipline themselves.”)RespectfullyTheron Patrick, Commander USCG (Ret.) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis February 3, 2013 at 11:29 am In regards to the follow-up response to my letter by the retired USCG Commander I acknowledge the articulate way you can express yourself. However, I do not concede any point. Evil does exist and I am not referring to the fantasy image of what is referred to as a devil. If evil does not exist, and does/did not creep into the minds and actions of humanity – then you Commander would have had other employment since the military establishments of all countries would have no reason to exist. “Our” United States has become a very sad countey in regards to the continual and increasing slaughter of innocent (and some guilty) people.The sociological reasons are many, and theories are likewise numerous. What is happening now is not a matter of giving up our civil rights to own firearms. This is about doing what we can to at least slow down the increasing numbers of people who are injured or killed. Any military “type” weapon (and not just a self-defense or hunting firearm) has no reason to exist in the hands of ordinary citizens. Just this morning there is a report of an ex-Navy sniper who was killed by another military man who has signs of post traumatic stress issues. I mention this as even highly trained military people and law enforcement civilians have the ability to destroy and kill at will. I was trained during Vietnam how to do the same. My point being that the firepower of military type weapons – and the availibilty of clips and magazines which will hold numerous bullets are just too dangerous to be so readily available. If and when another slaughter occurs I pray that our civilian law enforcement members will not be over-powered; which can likewise lead to our peace officers being easy to kill.So as to not create grounds for a “civil rebellion” buy those who support our military systems I acknowledge that I respect your military avocation and I respect your rank. I also believe we must have a highly trained and well armed military establishment – as evil does exist. Again, evil is not something which floats through the air, attacks people and causes subsequent mental disorders. Evil is something which is natural to the make-up of all humanity. Can it be explained to the satisfaction of all people? Of course not.Yes, my comments were written to hopefully stiir up the emotions of some. By stirring up emotions perhaps some will go into a time of discernment during which the acknowledgement that something (which is just a part of the carnage scenario) must be done – and it must begin yesterday.I too served in the military during Vietnam and I also have a defensive type firearm. Perhaps that possibly implies that I too have some knowldege of that which I speak? It is now getting to be close to time when I need to be with our congregation. And yes, I will read the letter from our Presiding Bishop which arrives yesterday by e-mail. I will like-wise urge our communicants to call our Congressional representatives and voice their opinion. This being regardless of which side of any fence they may be on. I respect your opinions and we do disagree on some issues. But I do believe you to be an honorable man who loves his country, and who also loves your extended family. I do ask: What would Jesus do in this situation? Wilbur Walkoe says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Karen Birr says: Ron Fox says: Presiding Bishop issues ‘call to action’ on gun violence Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Karen Birr says: March 27, 2013 at 5:32 pm MarekI am the NRA. I have been a member for 57 years. To say that I am an extremist is not only an insult to me, but is remarkably wrong, insensitive etc.I am a VeteranI am an HusbandI am a SonI am a FatherI am an AmericanI am a CitizenI am an EpiscopalianThe majority of NRA members (about 4,700,000 of us) do not favor new gun laws because everything you claim as reasonable is actually rather unreasonable and will accomplish nothing but grief for Citizens. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Robert Childress says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT February 3, 2013 at 4:02 pm I can’t really understand your stand on this issue. February 8, 2013 at 7:27 pm It was taken away by evil people not the second amendment. Don’t believe in the devil? February 2, 2013 at 4:33 pm Obama and the Democrats have avoided the issue of gun violence for so long that the interest some of them are now showing will need action in order to be convincing in any degree. Political agenda, or what is taken for such, is reflective – in every case – of moral values, and these moral values are obviously within the purview of the Church. In cases such as this one, in which specific action is urged on the part of members of Christ’s body, the underlying concern is not an agenda, but the well being of God’s people, and how particular actions may help bring foundational kingdom values to bear on public discourse. As a priest, I have a responsibility to those I seek to serve to urge prayerful action in instances of moral confusion and personal and spiritual danger. In any particular case, any of us may get things wrong, but please believe me when I say that what is of concern in this matter is the well being of our children and other innocents, and how our action or inaction, our words or silence, reflect and/or contribute to our collective spiritual health or peril.center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Robert Childress says: April 22, 2013 at 1:07 pm Get a history book!!! The phrase you quote is not from the Constitutiion. It is from the Declaration of Independence. While you are studying history, check out Nazi gun control laws of the 1930s. Rector Smithfield, NC February 2, 2013 at 11:28 am It is never too late to speak up for what is right. The Episcopal Church is not against guns (nor am I) but it is against gun violence. Even if you go the route of blaming “evil” people, evil people can do a lot less damage if they cannot get a semi-automatic weapon.Read again what is being asked:We need legislation that limits sales of military-style weapons and high-capacity magazines, requires effective background checks for all gun purchases, provides for better access to mental health services, and directs attention to gun trafficking.”I can’t see that this is unreasonable or infringes on anyone’s rights. It just sounds like good common sense to me. Steve Grech says: THe Rev. Alison C. Lucas says: Judy Mathews says: March 27, 2013 at 5:39 pm Thank you —Theron PatrickCommander USCG (Ret.) Ron Fox says: Comments navigation Newer comments February 3, 2013 at 7:32 am It is interesting to me that the responders are not responding to the PB’s request. I hear a request for Congress to address gun violence, not take a away the rights of the 2nd Amendment. However, particularly on the streets, the issue is not about legal possession of weapons. It is about illegal possession of weapons used to wound and kill the youth of the inner cities. So other than affecting the profits of the gun manufacturers, what is wrong with a more stringent licensing procedure to stop the flow of weapons from the wholesalers and gun shows to the streets? Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service February 1, 2013 at 4:28 pm There are 3,000,000 AR-15’s in this country (described as “personal defense weapons” by the Department of Homeland Security, by the way). About 350 people were killed by rifles of all kinds in 2011 according to the FBI. That includes the use of single-shot rifles as well and other kinds. That’s a vanishingly small percentage of rifles used to kill anyone. The problem isn’t guns. The problem is our culture of violence. If you want to cut down the number of guns in this country, give law-abiding people a reason not to need them. Sandi Lanzarotta Chan says: February 8, 2013 at 7:28 pm Nice… Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA Stephen Becroft says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Episcopal Public Policy Network] The following message comes from Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori.The United States has witnessed far too many public shootings in recent months and years. Far too many lives have been cut short or maimed by both random and targeted acts of gun violence. The school shooting in Newtown was horrific, yet since that day several times as many young people have died by gunshot.It is abundantly clear that Americans are ready to grapple with the complexities of gun violence. The Spirit is moving across this land to mobilize people of faith to act. I urge the United States members of this Church to call your federal legislators on Monday 4 February to express your concern and your expectation that gun violence be addressed. The outlines of the necessary policy decisions are clear and widely supported: limits on sales of military-style weapons and high-capacity magazines, effective background checks for all gun purchases, better access to mental health services, and attention to gun trafficking.We believe all God’s people should be able to live in peace, as Zechariah dreams, “old men and women shall again sit in the streets…And the streets of the city shall be full of boys and girls playing.” The prophet reminds his hearers that even if this seems impossible, with God it is not. [Zech 8:4-6] I urge you to add your voice to those clamoring for peace. Call your legislators and sue for peace.What you can do nowShare this message – You can forward this message here. You can find sample posts for Facebook and Twitter here.Make an announcement at church – The National Council of Churches has samples messages for sharing with your church, here.SIGN THE PLEDGE – Sign the pledge to change our culture of violence here. Identify your members of Congress – In case you don’t already know who your members are, you can look them up here. Have their names ready for Monday’s call-in day.What you can do Monday, 2/4Call your members of congress – Dial 1-888-897-0174 to reach the Capitol switchboard and ask for your member of Congress. When you are connected, tell the staff person:“I am a constituent and an Episcopalian, and I am calling to urge [name member of congress here] to support policies that will change the culture of violence in our country. We need legislation that limits sales of military-style weapons and high-capacity magazines, requires effective background checks for all gun purchases, provides for better access to mental health services, and directs attention to gun trafficking.”Repeat for your other two members of Congress. February 2, 2013 at 8:20 pm The liberal element of society in this nation, and this church, seeks solutions to problems about which collateral damage is ignored. The end result leaves the honest, law abiding member of the society shortchanged. As a competitor in rifle marksmanship, my venue of choice is labelled High Pwer shooting with a Service Rifle in matches promoted by the government. I’ve lost count of the number of speakers who have asserted that “hunters and sportsmen have nothing to fear, we’re only going after the criminals with their assault rifles,” and point to an AR-15. Whoops, the Service Rifle of choice happens to be an AR-15, followed by an M1A, both of which are to be banned.But it is just a little white lie! Facilitated by a lack of an ethical or moral compass to guide the individual in their search for solutions.The conservative element of society, and this church is equally guilty of failing to be consistent in their arguments, like the inconsistency betwewen opposing abortion, but battlinhg for the death penalty. To the left we oppose the death penalty, but argue the viability of a fetus.With 2500 or more gun laws on the books, mayber it is time for a paradyme shift. Gun Violence, Submit a Press Release February 4, 2013 at 10:07 am I don’t understand the claim that ‘guns don’t kill people….’ People wield the guns, but the guns clearly kill–in fact, regrettably, that is sometimes why people wield them. So, to reduce the killing, let’s have sensible restrictions. By all means enforce existing laws. In addition, since we require our soldiers to pass basic training, and would-be drivers to pass written and practical tests, and both are periodically re-tested for competence, we should do the same for gun owners. And since we register each car to its owner, let’s do the same with guns. In fact, this supports our 2nd amendment rights–surely a militia should be appropriately trained. Other useful proposals have been made. Of course they are not the whole answer–it is not possible to legislate human nature away. No doubt combating ‘the culture of violence’ is useful if it is possible, but many proposals with this goal have been in conflict with other constitutional provisions. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group February 1, 2013 at 9:26 pm I applaud Bishop Jefferts Schori for giving us a formula for acting positively to speak out for action and for voting for a change in our country’s gun laws. While some choose to blame death by guns on TV, on games, society, and on poor parenting, the killing goes on — and on.The number of Episcopalians who are able to respond CAN surely make a difference. The elected representatives have to depend on votes. We vote, and we can remind them of that fact. Rector Albany, NY Katerina Whitley says: Steve Grech says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Shari Derby says: Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing February 2, 2013 at 6:00 pm The following represents my opinions and I do not profess to speak for the Episcopal Church. I am fed up with those who cannot, or will not, be willing to make any compromises when it comes to taking action against the horrific slaughter of our fellow citizens, and the lives of our innocent children and grand-children. Again and again we must ask ourselves very fair questions: Where is God in all of this? What does it seriously mean to profess to be a Christian? What does Christianity teach us as it’s most very basic concepts? Jesus was willing to walk to his death as he would not give in on what he knew to be the “better ways of living.” Those ways are of God. For those who profess to be Christian may we also include the ways of Jesus the Christ. I am reminded time and time again of the story of the Greatest Commandment. Let us assume you who are reading this know how the story unfolds? We told to love all people as God loves us. Then why are millions not willing to make any type of love-based comprose when it comes to saving lives? The next victims could just as easily be your own famly members. No where are we immune to violence. Are you who grab your firearms and yell loudly that you will not give up your constitutional rights even willing to sit and listen to those who you perceive to be your enemy? Those who support some kinds of changes are not your enemy. Often we are our own worst enemy. Millions of us are also armed citizens, who try to use love, compassion, Christian ethics as we perceive them, and the common sense process of attempting to being pragmatic. We are all in this together and those who are trying to find and create ways to lesson the numbers of maniacal killings deserve to be listened to; just as we must respect your dignity by listening to your opinions. However, no-one of will be able accomplish anything if respect and dignity are not “lovingly” given to each other. What does it mean to resist ANY TYPE of weapons reform? What is truly behind the angry words of “No!” – to any compormise? Is it sometimes fear? If we live in fear then we cannot make good decisions. The person who wrote the editorial above mine speaks of evil people. Just who is evil and who defines what evil is? The potential evilness of humanity is often demonstrated by those who profess to be the experts about evil. The concept of: “those people over there are the really evil one’s” just doesn’t cut it. To progress we must seriously look within and use the mindset of Jesus when looking at our own opinions. Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY February 6, 2013 at 9:48 am Presiding Bishop Katherine Jeffords-Schori ‘call in action on gun violence’ is very misguided. It reflects the Obama-Feinstein position that has been so well publicized by the ‘in the tank’ media that inundates all of us. Many have naively responded supporting PB Schori’s position. The real need for ‘action on gun violence’ needs to be focused on the Obama administration itself. Where was the concern of PB Schori and others during the “Fast and Furious” debacle where large numbers of weapons were willingly supplied by the U.S. Government to Mexican Drug Cartels? This U.S. Government (aka Obama administration) was responsible for the deaths literally thousand of people in Mexico along with Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry. The silence is deafening.Where is the concern about potential for future wide spread violence from the current U. S. Government administration? There is silence on Homeland Security acquiring 7,000 select fire ARs (that the kind that has real full automatic capability). There is also silence about the acquisition of 1.7 billion (that’s right…billion) rounds of hollow point ammunition by Homeland Security.Is this part of some genocidal plan?The “ gun control plan” by Obama/Feinstein and supported by PB Schori, et. al. is nothing but a ruse for eventual confiscation followed by a total and complete ban of firearms from the American public. Jews for the Preservation of Firearms Ownership web site (http://www.jpfo.net/) is replete with the horrible and chilling results of gun control. No one can dispute these well documented historical examples.(Please see http://jpfo.net/pdf02/genocide-chart.pdf for The JPFO Genocide Chart.)The following is a disturbing quote form the above referenced website:“…… Hatred + Government + Disarmed Civilians = GenocideWhat makes the argument so powerful? Two factors. First, it makes common sense: unarmed defenseless people have no hope against armed aggressors. Second, it states the historical truth: evil governments did wipe out 170,000,000 innocent non-military lives in the 20th Century alone.. ……When the gun prohibitionists quote a statistic about how many people are killed by firearms misuse, the discussion sometimes bogs down into whose crime statistics to believe and how to count crimes vs. the defensive firearm uses.In the 20th Century:Governments murdered four times as many civilians as were killed in all the international and domestic wars combined.• Governments murdered millions more people than were killed by common criminals.How could governments kill so many people? The governments had the power – and the people, the victims, were unable to resist. The victims were unarmed.”The “gun control” put forth by Obama/Feinstein and supported by PB Schori et. al. clearly hearkens back to Nazi Weapons Law of 1938. How well did this work for German democracy? Gun Control leading to genocide is the worst kind of hatred and evil.Anything having to do with the Nazi era has no place this country or in any church. It is the worst kind of hatred and certainly is contrary to orthodox Christian teaching. Of course though, the Reichskirche did support the Nazi Government in the 1930s and in WWII, Makes you wonder, doesn’t it?PB Schori’s remarks only reference gun violence. Why? Should not this be a statement about all violence in society? Obviously absent from PB Schori’s statement was any remark about the Good News of the Gospel. Bringing the love of Jesus Christ to the hearts of the people is the real way to address the issue of violence. That is the real essence of the church. I wish PB Schori would comment on that. February 6, 2013 at 12:21 am The constitution also states the people have a right to life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness. That was all taken away from twenty seven children and adults by one person exercising the right to bear arms and another mentally unstable person with access to those firearms. February 2, 2013 at 2:01 pm I support the statements of the presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church.2 / 2 / 2013.Rev. Alison C. Lucas Steve Grech says: Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET David S. Halsted, M.D., F.A.C.S. says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC February 2, 2013 at 3:54 pm Citizens of the United States are 15 times more likely to be shot than citizens of any other developed country in the world! Each year 100,000 Americans are shot by guns and 30,000 die as a result. Every two years, more Americans die from gunfire than were killed in Vietnam, but they have no monument, and we have come to accept this as the cost for living in our country. This is insanity! Gun fire is the number one killer of children in our country. More children die from guns than cancer. Yet, we have placed more restrictions on toy guns than real guns. Do we not care to protect our children? It is clear that allowing our citizens to purchase any weapon and as many weapons as they like is not increasing our freedoms or making us safer. It is making us more vulernable and limiting our freedom to move about in safety. The Second Amendment has been grossly distorted. It allows for the right to bear arms so that a militia can be formed. We now have a strong miltary that makes this far less relevant as a measure. Most importantly, it does not state that we have a right to buy any kind of weapon that we desire or to be free to purchase military assault weapons or an unlimited supply of weapons and high capacity magazines. We cannot obtain a drivers license without going through a careful process. This isn’t the government trying to restrict our rights, but the government acknowleding that driving a car entails responsibilties and can be dangerous to the driver and to others. The same is true for owning a weapon. It should involve background checks and demands that we have taken a course to use it responsibly. Handguns pose the number threat among guns in our nation, and action must be taken to limit the widespread trafficking by straw buyers. What is now clear is that the NRA is an extremist organization that is little more than a front for the gun manufacturers and ammunition makers. The majority of NRA members support responsible gun restrictions, but the NRA supports ZERO gun restrictions. Go figure! Does this sound intilligent, safe or respectful of human life? The NRA has bought our politicians and scarred them to death about taking any action to make our country safer. It is wonderful to see our Presiding Bishop and other bishops and church leaders speaking out. The majority of Americans want stronger measures taken to insure a reduction of gun violence in our country. This won’t happen unless we demand our elected public servants to be less concerned about re-election and more concerned about protection of our citizenry. We also need to speak about and address the glorification of violence in our films, television programs and video games as well as do more to identify, care for and treat those who are mentally disturbed and could pose a harm to themselves and to others. For too long the Church has majored in minor issues. Working together to reduce gun violence in our society is a major issue that sane people expect our churches to champion. If not, how can we possibly claim to follow the Prince of Peace, when we buy into a culture of violence. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Theron Patrick says: Ron Fox says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Theron Patrick says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Steve Grech says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA February 1, 2013 at 4:12 pm I am an Episcopalian. What I see is that the problem is not one of gun violence anymore than the problem of 10,000 people killed every year by drunk drivers is one of car violence. The issue is not the tool, it’s violence. Mental health treatment and punishment of gun traffickers are great ideas, they actually attack the root of the problem.But none of these recent shootings would have been stopped by background checks – the purchasers of the guns they used either passed or would have passed them, and the gang members who are using guns to kill people in the streets of Chicago and elsewhere don’t get their guns from people who are going to run background checks. “Military-style weapons” aren’t really military weapons and aren’t really the issue – any semi-automatic weapon will serve for what they are doing, and no one is going to be saved by the second or two it takes to swap out a magazine.What will solve this issue is to condemn violence and the entertainers and culture that glorify it. We let them change the culture. We need to change it back. The Church needs to point out what is wrong with the culture and fight against it, not adopt it or be co-opted by it as we so often have. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab February 1, 2013 at 5:11 pm …the problem is, many churches don’t know how to teach right from wrong, and don’t even teach that there is right and wrong, including the Episcopal Church. They are too hung up on pushing political agenda. Why did the Presiding Bishop wait till now to speak against “violence”? (…though really she is speaking against law-abiding gun-owning citizens.) Because that’s what Obama and the Democrats are doing now. The problem is evil people, not people’s guns… but the Episcopal Church doesn’t understand that concept. Not anymore.Stand on the Foundation, and don’t snuggle up to politicians, and I might visit your church once in a while. You might speak with authority. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more

RIP: Trudy Vertucci-Ardizzone

first_img Posted Jan 30, 2013 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Tags Obituary, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Trudy Vertucci-Ardizzone, religious educator and author, died on Jan. 9. Born in Brooklyn, New York, she began her professional career as a special education teacher and clinical social worker. After her marriage to Joe Ardizzone and the birth of their daughter Francesca, the family moved to Southern California and joined St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Del Mar. Thus began a 23-year career as a religious educator whose highlights included serving as a consultant to the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego and the churchwide Office of Christian Formation; and as missioner for Christian formation at St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Lompoc, California.Wizards and Wonders, Trudy’s Vacation Bible School curriculum based on Harry Potter, was published by LeaderResources in 2002 and quickly became one of its all-time best sellers. It was the Children’s Program for General Convention 2003 in Minneapolis. In 2009, Trudy headed the team that presented The Discovery Center for Lifelong Christian Formation at the General Convention in Anaheim. Her latest VBS, The Peaceable Kingdom, will be published in 2013 by LeaderResources. Also an accomplished poet and playwright, two of Trudy’s poems appeared in the 2009 anthology Lifting Women’s Voices. RIP: Trudy Vertucci-Ardizzone Religious educator and author developed Vacation Bible School curricula Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs People Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

Bishop Pierre Whalon’s statement on the pope’s resignation

first_img Statement on the retirement of Pope Benedict XVI by the Rt. Rev. Pierre Whalon, bishop in charge of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in EuropeWe should salute the courageous decision of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI de retire and leave the See of Peter to another man. As he was beginning to show signs of his age, many feared reliving the last years of his predecessor. Clearly, Benedict XVI felt the same way. His resignation is therefore a relief for us all, including himself. With this very modern gesture, he is giving his successors an example to follow.Every time that I had the honor to meet Benedict, what struck me the most, besides the power of his intellect which has not weakened, is the humility and simplicity of this man, who never failed to be interested in those around him, great and small. I salute this courageous man, and I pray that the Lord will grant him a peaceful retirement, and perhaps the leisure to write more important books that will embellish an already imposing opus.Déclaration au moment de la démission du Pape Benoît XVI, par Monseigneur Pierre Whalon, Évêque chargé des Églises Épiscopales en EuropeNous devons saluer la décision courageuse de Sa Sainteté le Pape Benoît XVI de prendre sa retraite et laisser le siège de Pierre à un autre. Alors qu’il commençait à montrer des signes de son âge, beaucoup craignaient revivre les dernières années de son prédécesseur. Il est évident que Benoît XVI éprouvait aussi le même sentiment. Donc sa démission est un soulagement pour nous tous, et lui aussi. De ce geste bien moderne, il donne à ses successeurs l’exemple à suivre.Chaque fois que j’ai eu l’honneur de le rencontrer, ce qui m’a frappé le plus, en outre de la puissance de son intellect qui n’a pas faibli, c’est l’humilité et la simplicité de cet homme, qui ne manquait jamais de s’intéresser aux autres, les petits autant que les grands. Je salue cet homme courageux, et je prie que le Seigneur lui accorde une retraite paisible, et peut-être le loisir d’écrire encore d’autres livres importants qui embelliront une œuvre déjà imposante. Posted Feb 14, 2013 Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Ecumenical & Interreligious, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (1) Joyce Ann Edmondson says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Pope Resigns February 15, 2013 at 9:56 am Rt. Rev. Pierre Whalon, bishop in charge of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in EuropeI salute you for your thoughtful and gracious statements. It is so encouraging to see members of different denominations reflecting their “oneness” in such statements. Peace be with you. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Pierre Whalon’s statement on the pope’s resignation The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Making ‘digital’ disciples

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Episcopal News Service] Now, there’s a way to do Sunday school the rest of the week.In Poughkeepsie, New York, for example, Christ Church’s online “Soul School” offers parishioners a way to brush up on all things Episcopal without ever leaving their homes.It’s a computer class on Episcopal tradition, made available via a ChurchNext subscription. The Rev. William Blake Rider said he subscribed to the online service because “it’s a brilliant tool to use to let the people who might otherwise not be able to, participate.”“It’s the same reason that prompted me to duplicate our Wednesday night Christian education offerings at noon on Wednesday, because we realized that some of our frail or elderly … don’t drive at night but are still vital, they still want to learn, and to be engaged in parish life,” Rider said during a recent telephone interview.Similarly, the Rev. Paul Briggs of St. Mary’s Church in Manchester, Connecticut, said he is using a ChurchNext “Bible Challenge” video course narrated by Marek Zabriskie to “reach out to business guys on the road a lot … and to young people right out of confirmation class. It might be a nice way to give us common ground to talk about. I also invited folks across the spectrum, 20- and 30-somethings, as well as newly retired folks.”Online learning isn’t new; adapting it for church use is, and is extremely important for future church growth, according to Rider and others across the country.ChurchNext is not a substitute for weekly Sunday school or traditional Christian education offerings, “but it is another arrow in your quiver for lifelong learning,” said its developer, the Rev. Chris Yaw, who launched ChurchNext several months ago.“Churches that are vibrant are the ones that are helping people grow in their journey with Christ,” Yaw said during a recent telephone interview. “We recognize that healthy congregations help people learn about God, and grow closer to the Spirit but our 1950s Sunday school model of ‘come out on six Sunday nights in a row’ is not working.”Yaw, rector of St. David’s Church in Southfield, Michigan, said he came up with the idea because of the realities of parish life and after noticing that acquaintances and church members went online for education and career advancement.For example, getting prospective godparents to attend pre-baptism meetings is difficult and scheduling instructional time a few minutes before the start of the service is unrealistic.“I baptized three kids on Pentecost and with three sets of godparents who barely had time to get the kids to church” there was little room for instruction, he said. Instead, he envisions signing them up for a free godparenting class to be viewed at their leisure.Some 209 congregations—and not all of them Episcopalian—have enrolled for available courses on Scripture, liturgy, spirituality, prayer. self-care and relationships, he said.It’s affordable, user-friendly and flexible, added Yaw, who is partnering with Forward Movement. Individuals can sign up for $10 per course or $15 per month for unlimited access. Congregations can build their own private schools for $59 per month. Subscribers get unlimited access to ChurchNext courses, which are taught by experts.“Traditional adult formation doesn’t work for many people. If the only option is coming to classroom at a church building and sitting in a class, many parishioners will simply never engage in formation,” said the Rev. Scott Gunn, Forward Movement’s executive director.The Cincinnati-based publisher is partnering with ChurchNext because “this is an ideal way to experiment in the complex and changing world of video, benefitting from Chris Yaw’s expertise,” he said. “When we were founded in 1935, pamphlets were cutting edge. While print still works for lots of people, we want to encourage digital disciples too.”With more than 20 congregations enrolled, Audrey Scanlan, Connecticut’s diocesan canon for mission collaboration considers ChurchNext a way to “work across parish boundaries with each other to begin to strengthen those bonds of community between congregations and … to begin to build some standards for Christian formation.”In the Diocese of Texas, both the Logos Project and the Discovery Series also offer Christian education and resources via video.The Discovery Series, about the life of faith, has been used throughout the church as a resource and “will be broken into segments and made available online through Forward Movement so that the instructed Eucharist, or the segment on baptism may be used separately,” according to Carol Barnwell, diocesan communications director.“The total series is $200 and both Forward Movement and the Diocese of Texas continue to sell this resource for confirmation, spiritual gift assessment and deepening our faith,” she said. “It was produced by the Diocese of Texas so that even the smallest congregation without lots of clergy could prepare a confirmation class with the same depth as a large church with lots of teachers.”The Logos Project offers free online videos, featuring global faith leaders discussing theological, practical and spiritual topics. It has included presentations by Sister Joan Chittister, discussing Benedictine spirituality and Taizé Brother Emmanuel about rediscovering God’s love, as well as many others.The diocese is also “building a library of speakers to make available to churches and individuals at no cost,” Barnwell added. “These are kind of ‘ted talks’ for the church. The library is here.Kerry Allman, Internet Strategist in the Diocese of Olympia said the diocese has used its videoconferencing system to offer some workshops and is exploring other ways to use technology for Christian formation and to build community.Adapting technology to Christian formation is particularly helpful for dioceses like Olympia, where both geography and weather can hamper participation in more traditional classes, Allman said.He believes that “people are just going to have to come to terms with technology because it is so prevalent.”Although checking iPads or phones, blackberries and tablets was once considered rude, now “it’s just a part of reality,” he added. “I go to a lot of meetings where people under 40 are on their smartphones. It’s not that they’re not engaged or paying attention, it’s the way of the culture. We really need to figure out a way to embrace that and to make that a normal part of our everyday experience for worship and for communication.”Rider agreed. He just began offering the school coursework so has not yet had any feedback about them, he said.But, he added that: “The largest part of our growing faith community is families with one, two or three children. These are folks who do not come on Wednesdays and don’t hang around after church on Sunday,” he said. This (ChurchNext) is going to be a great tool to keep them connected to the church.”“We have a chance to deepen their life of faith which, frankly, doesn’t say Morehouse or Cokesbury or Lutheran … it says Christ Episcopal Church Online Soul School, and it has the potential to build a very robust suite of resources that any parish can have and that few of us could provide on our own.”Yaw envisions adding an unlimited supply of such courses as: Altar Guild 101; Vestry 101; how to meet and greet newcomers … how to help my friend with cancer; how to age with dignity and grace, how to handle my aging parent, and many more.“Church used to be the place for life questions and people would come to the priest for answers,” he said. “Our content delivery vehicle is broken, so people go to Oprah and Dr. Oz and the question is, how do we reclaim our place in the culture where we actually have these answers.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release By Pat McCaughanPosted Oct 11, 2013 Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Making ‘digital’ disciples Christian formation meets technology Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

Archbishop invites young Christians to spend year praying at Lambeth

first_img Rector Collierville, TN [Lambeth Palace press release] In a unique experiment, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby is to open up Lambeth Palace in London to Christians aged 20-35 – inviting them to spend a year living, studying and praying at a historic centre of the Anglican Communion.Launching in September 2015, the Community of St Anselm will gather a group of adventurous young adults from all walks of life, hungry for a challenging and formative experience of life in a praying community.The Community will initially consist of 16 people living at Lambeth Palace full-time, and up to 40 people, who live and work in London, joining part-time. The year-long programme will include prayer, study, practical service and community life.Members of the Community will live in a way the ancient monastics would recognise: drawing closer to God through a daily rhythm of silence, study and prayer. But, through those disciplines, they will also be immersed in the modern challenges of the global 21st century church.Lambeth Palace is in the process of recruiting a Prior to pioneer this new venture and direct its worship and work. The Prior will work under the auspices of the Archbishop, who will be Abbot of the Community.Archbishop Justin Welby said: “Stanley Hauerwas reminds us that the church should always be engaged in doing things that make no sense if God does not exist. The thing that would most make no sense at all if God does not exist is prayer. Living in a praying community is the ultimate wager on the existence of God, and is anything but comfortable or risk-free. Through it people subject themselves to discipline, to each other in community, and, above all, to God.“I expect this venture to have radical impact – not just for the individuals who participate but for life at Lambeth, across the Church and in the world we seek to serve. This is what we expect in following Jesus. I urge young people to step up: here is an open invitation to be transformed and to transform.”The Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Revd Dr Jo Wells, said: “Archbishop Justin is passionate about prayer and about community. The renewal of prayer and Religious Life is the first of his three priorities, and that is what the Community of St Anselm is all about.“We are inviting people from all around the Anglican Communion – and beyond – to live a year in God’s time. There are no qualifications for joining the Community except a longing to pray, to learn, to study together the things of God, and so to be stretched in body, mind and spirit.”“Archbishop Justin longs that Lambeth Palace be not so much a historic place of power and authority, but a place from which blessing and service reach to the ends of the earth.”To find out more, visit: www.stanselm.org.uk Associate Rector Columbus, GA Posted Sep 5, 2014 Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion, Archbishop of Canterbury, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release September 13, 2014 at 2:57 pm BRAVO! This should be replicated by Anglicans / Episcopalians around the world. Opening up this initiative to older people would facilitate experience and knowledge from the older members to the young, and vice-versa, which is equally important! We must cultivate our faith like any other form of education. It does not just pop up in people! The Holy Spirit calls, but we must nurture and feed our faith through dialog and sharing. Communities in faith are a holy gift. Featured Events Michael Grear says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Frank Bergen says: Rector Belleville, IL Archbishop invites young Christians to spend year praying at Lambeth Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN September 14, 2014 at 4:59 pm A marvelous idea, which merited a lead article in the Tablet (UK RC publication). Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth & Young Adults Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments are closed. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Comments (2) Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

Anglican cathedral in Zanzibar joins fight against modern slavery

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Alliance] The Anglican Diocese of Zanzibar’s plans to create a center at its renovated Christ Church Cathedral to raise awareness about the history of slavery in Zanzibar and current human trafficking realities in East Africa and worldwide.All Saints’ Cathedral, Diocese of ZanzibarPart of the Anglican Church of Tanzania, the diocese embarked on the cathedral refurbishing project on Oct 1, 2013 in partnership with World Monuments Fund Britain and announced in its July 2015 newsletter that efforts to raise its portion of grant funding had been successful.The cathedral’s planned Heritage and Education Centre will retell the story of the East African slave trade in a form accessible to school children, in both English and Kiswahili.The center also intends to educate about modern-day realities, including the fact that there are now more slaves on the planet than at any previous time in history, with trafficking of women figuring as the world’s second largest industry, and that Zanzibar once again is serving as a trafficking point, especially of children.The Anglican Diocese of Zanzibar aims to offer visitors concrete steps they can take to join in combating the crisis.Globally it is estimated that there are more than 30 million victims of modern slavery. It is a priority for governments and faith communities throughout the world.On Dec. 2, 2014, a historic meeting was held at the Vatican where faith leaders joined to commit together to work towards the ending of modern slavery. Convened by the Global Freedom Network, the declaration was signed by the Pope, the Archbishop of Canterbury and other global faith leaders.Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby affirmed in his address on that occasion that faith leaders share “a deep shared commitment for the liberation of those humiliated, abused and enslaved by their fellow-human beings.”Welby said faith leaders can make sure that every worshiping community knows about modern slavery and is ready to work to prevent and end such abuses.“As we make this solemn commitment today, my prayer is that we shall by God’s grace play a key role in ending the inhuman practices of modern slavery – practices that disfigure our world and obscure the image of God in men, women and children. We have the will, we have the common purpose, this can be done; may God bless our action together,” he said.The Zanzibar initiative continues a long Anglican tradition of advocating for the human right to freedom and dignity, notes Rachel Carnegie, Anglican Alliance co-executive director.The Anglican Alliance is working to lift up such examples of local church action and to connect Anglicans with others within the Anglican Communion and beyond who are working to end modern slavery.“The Anglican Church played a key role in ending the trans-Atlantic slave trade and again today is called to work together with others to confront and end modern-day forms of slavery,” she says.“Ending human trafficking is one of the Anglican Alliance’s three global priorities,” she says.To that end the Anglican Alliance is providing a platform for Anglicans to share their skills, vision and research.A November 2014 global Anglican Alliance consultation and webinar on slavery looked at how churches and faith groups could work together to tackle the problem. Participants recommended mapping available resources and providing education on protection and prevention.“It’s important to connect churches and agencies who are working to stop modern-day slavery by sharing insights and building capacity so that we can respond more effectively,” Carnegie says.Local education efforts such as the Anglican Diocese of Zanzibar’s heritage and education center are important to raise awareness of the problem to prevent the crime and enable swifter identification of those who have been trafficked, she points out.And housing the center in a core place of worship of the diocese underlines the fact that faith communities have a unique role to play in the response to modern slavery and human trafficking, she adds.Consultation participants pointed to the importance of having a spiritual anchoring for the church’s work against trafficking and the way in which applying biblical principles could deepen understanding and engagement by local churches.The Zanzibar center also aims to promote interfaith and inter-communal dialogue and understanding.The center and its exhibits will be accessible for people living with disabilities, including tours in Sign Language. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Anglican Communion, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Africa, Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Human Trafficking Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Posted Jul 14, 2015 center_img Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Anglican cathedral in Zanzibar joins fight against modern slavery Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more

Paris climate deal: Archbishop hails ‘remarkable achievement’

first_imgParis climate deal: Archbishop hails ‘remarkable achievement’ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted Dec 14, 2015 Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Anglican Communion, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC [Lambeth Palace] Welcoming the climate deal reached in Paris this weekend, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said the global church must be a key partner in tackling climate change. Welby’s statement follows.I warmly welcome the agreement that almost 200 states came to in Paris on Saturday, setting a clear and ambitious path towards tackling global climate change.Earlier this year I, alongside many other faith leaders, endorsed the Lambeth Declaration on Climate Change. The Declaration recognised the COP21 negotiations as a pivotal moment in the urgent global challenge to tackle climate change.”As faith leaders, we urged those participating in the negotiations to apply the best of our world’s intellectual, economic and political resources to reach a legally-binding global agreement to limit the global rise in average temperatures to 2oC. The commitment made by world leaders to hold the increase in global temperatures to ‘well below’ this level is welcome and courageous progress.Those most affected by climate change are the poor. In our prayers and actions we must demonstrate our love for them through sustainable and generous innovation.The success of the negotiations to bring together so many different countries and groups to an agreement is a remarkable achievement.One of the Anglican Communion’s marks of mission says that we are “to strive to safeguard the integrity of creation, and sustain and renew the life of the earth”. The global church – extraordinarily led on the issue of climate change by Pope Francis and the Ecumenical Patriarch – must be a key partner in tackling climate change. As the Body of Christ, his church is called to be incarnational. Each of us has a role to play, if we are to help achieve what has been agreed in Paris. Advocacy Peace & Justice, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Environment & Climate Change Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC center_img Archbishop of Canterbury, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

Commonalities surface as Galatians 6:2 participants share their stories

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Commonalities surface as Galatians 6:2 participants share their stories The Rev. C. K. Robertson, canon to Presiding Bishop Michael Curry for ministry beyond the Episcopal Church, and Rebecca Linder Blachly, the U.S. State Department’s senior policy advisor for Africa in the Office of Religion and Global Affairs, play with orphans at Valentine Orphanage April 2, during a group visit to outreach ministries of the Diocese of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Photo: Andrea Mann[Episcopal News Service – Dar es Salaam, Tanzania] Throughout the Galatians 6:2 Conference, participants from six Anglican Communion provinces found that on issues of Anglican and Episcopal identity, theological education, migration, human trafficking and the environment, their commonalities outnumber their differences.Coming together to discuss challenges affecting the church and the world and seeking solutions reminded the Rev. Vicentia Kgabe, rector for The College of the Transfiguration in Grahamstown, South Africa, of the importance of community and of the richness of the Anglican Communion.“The bonds of affection continue to get stronger,” said Kgabe. But the church, he added, needs to strengthen its voice in the world.Twenty-three people representing six Anglican Communion provinces – Burundi, Central Africa, Southern Africa, Tanzania,West Africa, and the U.S.-based Episcopal Church – gathered for theMarch 30-April 3 conference aimed at developing a model of collaboration that will enable the provinces to carry one another’s burdens in mission. Throughout the conference, the group held in prayer neighboring Burundi, which is experiencing ongoing political conflict and violence.The referenced verse, “Bear one another’s burdens and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ,” undergirded the participants’ work and fellowship.One of the most hopeful outcomes of the conference “is the realization and the recognition that we are part of each other as brothers and sisters in Christ,” said Bishop Brian Marajh of the Diocese of George in the Anglican Church of Southern Africa. He added that it is important to put this in the context of “where we find ourselves in the Anglican Communion … the Gospel imperative is to be a part, rather than being apart.”Patricia Kisare, the Episcopal Church’s Washington, D.C.-based officer for international affairs, and Bishop Jacob Ayeebo of Tamale, Anglican Church of Ghana, speak to one of the sisters from the Community of St. Mary, an order of the Anglican Church of Tanzania. Photo: Andrea MannIssues of human sexuality and same-sex marriage have strained relations in the Anglican Communion since the early 2000s.In January, a majority of Anglican primates called for temporary “consequences” for the Episcopal Church, recommending that its participation in ecumenical dialogues and some Anglican Communion bodies be restricted. The primates’ actions at their gathering in Canterbury, England, were a response to the 2015 General Convention’s decisions to change canonical language defining marriage, and the authorization of marriage rites that would apply to both same- and opposite-sex couples.The Galatians 6:2 Conference had been planned in advance of the primates’ gathering, in part in response to those longstanding differences, but also as an ongoing changing approach to missional relationships and partnerships between churches in the United States and Africa. The conference was conceived during an October 2014 meeting in New York City where the six primates in attendance set their intention to build missional partnerships among their churches.“One of the greatest takeaways of this conference has been the strengthening of our relationships as members together of our global Anglican family,” said the Rev. Chuck K. Robertson, canon to Presiding Bishop Michael Curry for ministry beyond the Episcopal Church. Robertson participated in the Galatians 6:2 Conference as part of the Episcopal Church’s delegation. “In the sharing of our stories, in our deliberations and decisions, and in our common prayer, we have deepened the friendships and trust between us even as we commit ourselves anew to the crucial work before us all,” he added“These people are interested in working in partnership, not in isolation,” said the Rev. Canon Isaac Kawuki-Mukasa, who works as an officer for Africa relations for both the Anglican Church of Canada and the Episcopal Church.Kawuki-Mukasa facilitated the conference alongside the Rev. Ranjit K. Mathews, the Episcopal Church’s Africa partnerships officer, and Patricia Kisare, the Episcopal Church’s Washington, D.C.-based officer for international affairs. Observers included Rebecca Linder Blachly, the U.S. State Department’s senior policy advisor for Africa in the Office of Religion and Global Affairs; Grace Kaiso, general secretary of the Council of Anglican Provinces of Africa, and Andrea Mann, director of global relations for the Anglican Church of Canada.“Any time there is an opportunity for the communion to come together to work on important matters of mutual concern it’s a good thing,” said Mann, adding that this conference was of particular importance because participants were seeking to develop a model of collaboration intended to lead to provincial partnerships. “It’s a concrete implementation of a commission of primates to provinces to get going on something.”Participants and facilitators are writing a letter to communicate the group’s findings and recommendations for future collaboration to the six primates. Participants included bishops, priests, deans and development officials, who throughout the conference worked in small groups and shared their stories and experiences as they discussed nine topics that were established in advance of the conference. The nine topics were: sustainability, health/environment, human trafficking/migration, theological education/religious freedom, and finance/pension.At the outset of the conference participants entered into a covenant with one another to be fully present, to listen and to share their stories. It was through a generous spirit and storytelling that commonalities and connections began to form.“Relationships have been formed, we are in each other’s road now,” said Bishop David Rice of the Diocese of San Joaquin in Central California. “This will allow us to do something with that, travel that road together, carry each other’s burdens.”Despite existing differences in the Anglican Communion, as the Galatians Conference has shown, the communion has far more in common than what it disagrees about, said Mathews.“We are going to continue to reach out in partnership based on common mission. We continue to believe that what holds us together is much stronger than what divides us,” he said. “It’s time we focus on what holds us together. This is a concrete example of moving forward, and that’s why it’s significant. For such a long time we have allowed others to define what we mean by partnership.”The Galatians Conference was just one example of the ways the Episcopal Church and its primate, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, remain in conversation with Anglican provinces in Africa. For example, Curry will travel to Accra, Ghana, in May for a meeting of the Consultation of Anglican Bishops in Dialogue, which began at the 2008 Lambeth Conference in response to differences over same-sex unions and larger questions of biblical interpretation.The Galatians Conference took place a little more than a week in advance of the Anglican Consultative Council, which brings together up to three representatives of each province every three or four years, and is scheduled to meet April 8-19 in Zambia.– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 By Lynette WilsonPosted Apr 4, 2016 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Africa, Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

La ‘impía trinidad’ sirve como llamado a combatir la pobreza,…

first_img Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA De izquierda a derecha, los obispos diocesanos Jeffrey Lee, de Chicago; Ian Douglas, de Connecticut; Mark Beckwith, de Newark; Eugene Taylor Sutton, de Maryland y Mariann Edgar Budde de Washington, portan una pancarta del simposio de la “Impía Trinidad” al frente de una procesión que recorrió las calles del barrio Hyde Park de Chicago el 21 de abril. Foto de David Paulsen/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Chicago, Illinois] Dispuestos a trabajar  por la solución de los problemas de la pobreza, el racismo y la violencia armada, obispos, clérigos y feligreses episcopales se reunieron durante tres días en un simposio [o conferencia] en Chicago, la ciudad de Estados Unidos que ha registrado el mayor número de homicidios en 2016.El creciente incremento de la violencia armada en la ciudad brindaba un trasfondo desalentador a la “Impía Trinidad”, un simposio auspiciado por Obispos Unidos contra la Violencia Armada que sesionó del 20 al 22 de abril en la Escuela Luterana de Teología en el barrio de Hyde Park de la ciudad. Pero los oradores enfatizaron que el problema no es de una sola ciudad, ni el pronóstico es tan desalentador como sugieren muchos titulares de la prensa.El Rdo. Michael Pfleger, sacerdote catolicorromano y activista en Chicago, habla desde un podio en un punto intermedio de la procesión de la Impía Trinidad el 21 de abril. Foto de David Paulsen/ENS.El simposio contó con la presencia de unos 150 asistentes proveniente de 37 diócesis episcopales, entre ellos 25 obispos  y un obispo electo. Los asistentes fueron en su mayoría episcopales, aunque otras denominaciones cristianas también estaban representadas, entre ellas luteranos y presbiterianos y un sacerdote catolicorromano, el Rdo. Michael Pfleger, que predicó en un punto intermedio de una procesión pública el 21 de abril.Un tema subyacente del simposio fue cómo la Iglesia Episcopal y los cristianos en general tienen la singular capacidad de constituir una fuerza para el cambio en el país a pesar de abrumadoras dificultades. Entre esas dificultades se cuenta la creencia de algunos cristianos de que las causas de la justicia social no deben ser las causas de la Iglesia, una posición que el Rdo. Julian DeShazier destacó en la presentación central del simposio el 21 de abril.“¿Cuándo se convirtió en algo revolucionario para los cristianos ocuparse de la justicia?”, preguntó retóricamente DeShazier a los asistentes al simposio en la capilla de la Escuela de Teología.DeShazier pastor principal de la Iglesia Universitaria de la Universidad de Chicago quien también es t un músico  de hip-hop conocido como J.Kwest, dijo que para muchos cristianos las iglesias se han convertido en “comités de expertos” cuando deberían ser “centros de acción”. Él sacó a colación la experiencia de la labor de su congregación con activistas del Sur de Chicago en presionar a la universidad para abrir un centro de trauma. Los barrios circunvecinos, a pesar de la alta incidencia de delitos, no contaban con ningún centro de trauma cercano.Los otros dos presentadores fueron Natalie Moore, reportera de la WBEZ-FM que cubre la  Zona Sur, y la Rda. Kelly Brown Douglas, profesora de religión en Goucher College en Baltimore, Maryland, y canóniga teóloga en la Catedral Nacional de Washington.Véase imagen en TwitterMoore arguyó que el racismo está en parte detrás de la atención sobre la violencia de Chicago, y también sugirió un motivo político a las críticas de la ciudad, el lugar de residencia del ex presidente Barack Obama. Ella instó a los presentes a superar los estereotipos, tales como el de considerar los barrios urbanos deprimidos como zonas de guerra, en tanto se esfuerzan por ponerle fin a la violencia armada.Douglas, en su presentación, detalló las raíces del racismo en la era colonial, antes de bosquejar una denuncia de la supremacía blanca en EE.UU. Los altos índices de pobreza y de encarcelación que enfrentan los negros en la actualidad, arguyó ella, son los continuos efectos de una “violenta narrativa anti negra que ayuda a definir la identidad estadounidense”.Dada tal opresión histórica y sistémica, por qué debe sorprender que los negros se enfrenten a una amenaza de violencia mayor, preguntó Douglas.“El sistema ha sido estructurado para conducirlos a la muerte, no a la vida”, afirmó ella.Si las palabras de los tres ponentes se proponían confrontar a los asistentes al simposio con las duras realidades históricas del racismo, la pobreza y la violencia armada, gran parte del resto de la conferencia se dedicó a enseñar maneras de trascender esa historia y cambiar el sistema opresivo que persiste hasta hoy.El activismo contra la violencia armada cuenta desde hace mucho con el respaldo de la Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal, la cual aprobó resoluciones que se remontan a 1976 en apoyo de varias formas de control de armas.Los talleres que se impartieron en la tarde del 21 de abril incluyeron debates sobre la manera de cabildear a los legisladores, cómo participar con cristianos evangélicos sobre estos temas y cómo crear campañas de organización comunitaria. En una sesión, la Rda. Carol Reese discutió su trabajo como capellana del centro de trauma del hospital John H. Stroger de Chicago, mientras en otra sesión, una delegación de la Diócesis de Massachusetts explicaba el éxito de esa diócesis en trabajar con jóvenes en un programa llamado B-Peace for Jorge, nombrado así por un joven que fue asesinado en 2012.El obispo de la Diócesis de Maryland, Eugene Taylor Sutton, dirige a la multitud en cánticos y canciones durante la procesión de la Impía Trinidad. Foto de David Paulsen/ENS.Los obispos que convocaron y fueron los anfitriones del simposio se hicieron eco del llamado a la acción en la última jornada, el 22 de abril. El obispo de la Diócesis de Connecticut, Ian Douglas, y el obispo de la Diócesis de Newark, Mark Beckwith, dividieron a los asistentes en cuatro grupos para compartir ideas sobre temas fundamentales: liturgia pública, estrategia de comunicación, promoción política y organización comunitaria. Y el obispo de la Diócesis de Chicago, Jeffrey Lee, prosiguió luego hablándole al pleno del simposio sobre los medios en que la liturgia pública puede llegar a las personas que se encuentran más allá de los muros de una iglesia.El simposio demostró el poder de la liturgia pública en la noche del segundo día con una procesión por las aceras de la ciudad  que se llevó a cabo a través dela Universidad de Chicago.El obispo Edward Konieczny, de la Diócesis de Oklahoma, inició la procesión con un discurso en las gradas de la Escuela de Teología. Lee, Douglas y Beckwith, así como el obispo diocesano de Maryland Eugene Taylor Sutton y la obispa de la Diócesis de Washington Mariann Edgar Budde, encabezaron luego la marcha llevando la pancarta del simposio a lo largo de la Calle 55 y la Ave. Ellis hasta el parque de Midway Plaisance, donde Pfleger habló.El obispo de la Diócesis de Oklahoma, Edward Konieczny, se dirige a la multitud antes de iniciarse la procesión el 21 de abril. Foto de David Paulsen/ENS.Cada uno de los tres días comenzó con un estudio bíblico contextual dirigido por Dora Rudo Mbuwayesango, profesora de Antiguo Testamento en el Seminario Teológico Hood en Salisbury, Carolina del Norte. Los participantes escogieron dos pasajes poco conocidos del Antiguo Testamento y la bien conocida parábola evangélica del buen samaritano, explorándolos en busca de un significado bíblico más profundo al tiempo que los debatían en el contexto del simposio.– David Paulsen es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Pueden dirigirse a él a [email protected] Traducción de Vicente Echerri. 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