World Test Championship: FAQs and all you need to know about the inaugural tournament

first_imgWorld Test Championship: FAQs and all you need to know about the inaugural tournamentWhat is World Test Championship? With the much-anticipated cycle of Test matches set to begin with the first Ashes Test, here’s all that you need to know about latest series of effort from ICC aimed at provided more context to Test cricket.advertisement Ajay Tiwari New DelhiJuly 24, 2019UPDATED: July 24, 2019 15:30 IST India will begin their World Test Championship campaign during tour of West Indies in August (AP Photo)HIGHLIGHTSTop teams will feature in the World Test Championships over a 2-year cyclePoints will be awarded to Test match wins in bilateral seriesTop 2 teams at the end of the 2-year cycle will play the Test Championships finalThe maiden edition of the highly-anticipated World Test Championship (WTC) is all set to start with the inaugural Ashes Test between England and Australia starting from August 1 in Birmingham. The 2-Test series between Sri Lanka and New Zealand starting from August 14 will also be played in the WTC fold with India’s tour to the Caribbean following next.In this explainer, we will take you through everything that you wanted to know about the World Test Championship – from its rules, teams, rankings, fixtures and the whether the winner will be decided by a Super Over or not! Read on:What is the World Test Championship and why do we need it?The World Test Championship is the latest in a series of efforts from the International Cricket Council (ICC) to provide more context to Test cricket. While earlier, Test rankings at the end of every season decided who would hold the Test Championship mace, the WTC promises to change all that with teams fighting it out in a 2-year-long tournament rather than just depending on the rankings to decide the winner in the sport’s oldest and most coveted format. With every Test being played under the WTC fold counting towards an overall points table, the general lack of interest in dead rubbers at the end of a series is also set to decline sharply.Are all Test-playing teams playing the World Test Championship?Simple answer, no. As you must be aware, Zimbabwe is no more allowed to feature in ICC tournaments, although they weren’t in the scheme of things anyway when ICC designed the tournament. Apart from Zimbabwe, Test cricket’s 2 newest entrants Afghanistan and Ireland will also not be involved in the inaugural edition of the WTC. Essentially it would mean that the top nine-ranked Test nations – Australia, Bangladesh, England, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka and the West Indies – will be part of the 1st World Test Championship.advertisementOkay. But how will the winner be decided? Will a Super Over come into play?For every match played under the WTC, a certain number of points will be up for grabs and the top 2 teams with the most points at the end of the 2-year cycle will play the final at Lord’s in June 2021 to decide the winner. If the final is tied or drawn, the team which topped the points table at the end of the league stage will be declared the winner. However, the ICC rules haven’t made it clear what would happen if both the teams are tied on points as well. A Super Over? Probably not. However, things might get clearer in the coming days once ICC clarifies the rules.Will every Test played from August 1, 2019 be part of the World Test Championship?No. The Tests played by WTC nations against Zimbabwe, Afghanistan and Ireland will not be part of the WTC cycle but will still be relevant for the ICC Test Rankings. Marquee series like The Ashes and the Border-Gavaskar Trophy will be part of the WTC.But will the 9 teams play each other during the World Test Championship?Again, no. All 9 teams are scheduled to play a total of 6 Test series (3 Home, 3 Away) under the WTC fold meaning that no team will be able to play the rest others in the 2-year cycle.This could mean that teams will end up playing an unequal number of matches…Yes, but the ICC has tried to balance this by making a total of 120 Championship points being available for every series irrespective of its length.This points system is confusing me. Could you explain more?As explained in the table below, each Test series will have 120 Championship points up for grabs. The number of points for each Test will be equal to 120 divided by the total number of matches in the series. For example, a win in either of the Tests of the 2-Test series between West Indies and India in August 2019 will award the winner 60 points but the corresponding award for winning an Ashes Test will be 24 points (details below).If the match is a draw, both the teams will get only one-third of the points available for the match, thus incentivizing teams to go for an outright result rather than trying to secure a draw.Points Distribution of World Test Championship explained:Matches in SeriesPoints for WinPoints for a TiePoints for a DrawPoints for a Loss260302003402013.30430151005241280Is this a good system?At least it’s a start in the right direction. The system is not without its fallacies. For one, it doesn’t give any extra weight to away wins and if a team plays more Tests at home, winning most of them, it could still end up ranking higher than a team which has more away wins in tough conditions but playing a lesser number of matches.advertisementAlso, there are chances that a series of lesser number of Tests (2-3) could be more rewarding than a grueling 5-Test series like The Ashes. Given, this is the maiden edition of the World Test Championship, further changes in the system could be arrived at in the future as the ICC keeps learning from the outcomes.Here is a list of complete fixtures of the World Test Championship in the 2019-21 cycle:IndiaJuly-August 2019: 2 Tests v West Indies (A)October-November 2019: 3 Tests v South Africa (H)November 2019: 2 Tests v Bangladesh (H)February 2020: 2 Tests v New Zealand (A)December 2020: 4 Tests v Australia (A)January-February 2021: 5 Tests v England (H)EnglandJuly-August 2019: 5 Tests v Australia (H)December 2019-January 2020: 4 Tests v South Africa (A)March 2020: 2 Tests v Sri Lanka (A)June-July 2020: 3 Tests v West Indies (H)July-August 2020: 3 Tests v Pakistan (H)January-February 2021: 5 Tests v India (A)AustraliaJuly-August-September 2019: 5 Tests v England (A)November 2019: 2 Tests v Pakistan (H)December 2019-January 2020: 3 Tests v New Zealand (H)February 2020: 2 Tests v Bangladesh (A)November-December 2020: 4 Tests v India (H)February-March 2021: 3 Tests v South Africa (A)South AfricaOctober 2019: 3 Tests v India (A)December 2019-January 2020: 4 Tests v England (H)July-August 2020: 2 Tests v West Indies (A)January 2021: 2 Tests v Sri Lanka (H)January-February 2021: 2 Tests v Pakistan (A)February-March 2021: 3 Tests v Australia (H)New ZealandJuly-August 2019: 2 Tests v Sri Lanka (A)December 2019-January 2020: 3 Tests v Australia (A)February 2020: 2 Tests v India (H)August-September 2020: 2 Tests v Bangladesh (A)November-December 2020: 3 Tests v West Indies (H)December 2020: 2 Tests v Pakistan (H)Sri LankaJuly-August 2019: 2 Tests v New Zealand (H)October 2019: 2 Tests v Pakistan (A)March-April 2020: 2 Tests v England (H)July-August 2020: 3 Tests v Bangladesh (H)January 2021: 2 Tests v South Africa (A)February-March 2021: 2 Tests v West Indies (A)PakistanOctober 2019: 2 Tests v Sri Lanka (H)November-December 2019: 2 Tests v Australia (A)January-February 2020: 2 Tests v Bangladesh (H)July-August 2020: 3 Tests v England (A)December 2020: 2 Tests v New Zealand (A)January-February 2021: 2 Tests v South Africa (H)BangladeshNovember 2019: 3 Tests v India (A)January-February 2020: 2 Tests v Pakistan (A)February 2020: 2 Tests v Australia (H)July-August 2020: 3 Tests v Sri Lanka (A)August-September 2020: 2 Tests v New Zealand (H)January-February 2021: 3 Tests v Windies (H)West IndiesJuly-August 2019: 2 Tests v India (H)June-July 2020: 3 Tests v England (A)July-August 2020: 2 Tests v South Africa (H)November-December 2020: 3 Tests v New Zealand (A)January-February 2021: 3 Tests v Bangladesh (A)February-March 2021: 2 Tests v Sri Lanka (H)Also Read | Sourav Ganguly surprised by absence of Shubman Gill, Ajinkya Rahane in ODI squad for West Indies tourAlso Read | Joe Root wants England to ride on World Cup win for Ashes gloryAlso See:For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAkshay Ramesh Tags :Follow World Test ChampionshipFollow India cricket teamFollow ICClast_img

first_imgWorld Test Championship: FAQs and all you need to know about the inaugural tournamentWhat is World Test Championship? With the much-anticipated cycle of Test matches set to begin with the first Ashes Test, here’s all that you need to know about latest series of effort from ICC aimed at provided more context to Test cricket.advertisement Ajay Tiwari New DelhiJuly 24, 2019UPDATED: July 24, 2019 15:30 IST India will begin their World Test Championship campaign during tour of West Indies in August (AP Photo)HIGHLIGHTSTop teams will feature in the World Test Championships over a 2-year cyclePoints will be awarded to Test match wins in bilateral seriesTop 2 teams at the end of the 2-year cycle will play the Test Championships finalThe maiden edition of the highly-anticipated World Test Championship (WTC) is all set to start with the inaugural Ashes Test between England and Australia starting from August 1 in Birmingham. The 2-Test series between Sri Lanka and New Zealand starting from August 14 will also be played in the WTC fold with India’s tour to the Caribbean following next.In this explainer, we will take you through everything that you wanted to know about the World Test Championship – from its rules, teams, rankings, fixtures and the whether the winner will be decided by a Super Over or not! Read on:What is the World Test Championship and why do we need it?The World Test Championship is the latest in a series of efforts from the International Cricket Council (ICC) to provide more context to Test cricket. While earlier, Test rankings at the end of every season decided who would hold the Test Championship mace, the WTC promises to change all that with teams fighting it out in a 2-year-long tournament rather than just depending on the rankings to decide the winner in the sport’s oldest and most coveted format. With every Test being played under the WTC fold counting towards an overall points table, the general lack of interest in dead rubbers at the end of a series is also set to decline sharply.Are all Test-playing teams playing the World Test Championship?Simple answer, no. As you must be aware, Zimbabwe is no more allowed to feature in ICC tournaments, although they weren’t in the scheme of things anyway when ICC designed the tournament. Apart from Zimbabwe, Test cricket’s 2 newest entrants Afghanistan and Ireland will also not be involved in the inaugural edition of the WTC. Essentially it would mean that the top nine-ranked Test nations – Australia, Bangladesh, England, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka and the West Indies – will be part of the 1st World Test Championship.advertisementOkay. But how will the winner be decided? Will a Super Over come into play?For every match played under the WTC, a certain number of points will be up for grabs and the top 2 teams with the most points at the end of the 2-year cycle will play the final at Lord’s in June 2021 to decide the winner. If the final is tied or drawn, the team which topped the points table at the end of the league stage will be declared the winner. However, the ICC rules haven’t made it clear what would happen if both the teams are tied on points as well. A Super Over? Probably not. However, things might get clearer in the coming days once ICC clarifies the rules.Will every Test played from August 1, 2019 be part of the World Test Championship?No. The Tests played by WTC nations against Zimbabwe, Afghanistan and Ireland will not be part of the WTC cycle but will still be relevant for the ICC Test Rankings. Marquee series like The Ashes and the Border-Gavaskar Trophy will be part of the WTC.But will the 9 teams play each other during the World Test Championship?Again, no. All 9 teams are scheduled to play a total of 6 Test series (3 Home, 3 Away) under the WTC fold meaning that no team will be able to play the rest others in the 2-year cycle.This could mean that teams will end up playing an unequal number of matches…Yes, but the ICC has tried to balance this by making a total of 120 Championship points being available for every series irrespective of its length.This points system is confusing me. Could you explain more?As explained in the table below, each Test series will have 120 Championship points up for grabs. The number of points for each Test will be equal to 120 divided by the total number of matches in the series. For example, a win in either of the Tests of the 2-Test series between West Indies and India in August 2019 will award the winner 60 points but the corresponding award for winning an Ashes Test will be 24 points (details below).If the match is a draw, both the teams will get only one-third of the points available for the match, thus incentivizing teams to go for an outright result rather than trying to secure a draw.Points Distribution of World Test Championship explained:Matches in SeriesPoints for WinPoints for a TiePoints for a DrawPoints for a Loss260302003402013.30430151005241280Is this a good system?At least it’s a start in the right direction. The system is not without its fallacies. For one, it doesn’t give any extra weight to away wins and if a team plays more Tests at home, winning most of them, it could still end up ranking higher than a team which has more away wins in tough conditions but playing a lesser number of matches.advertisementAlso, there are chances that a series of lesser number of Tests (2-3) could be more rewarding than a grueling 5-Test series like The Ashes. Given, this is the maiden edition of the World Test Championship, further changes in the system could be arrived at in the future as the ICC keeps learning from the outcomes.Here is a list of complete fixtures of the World Test Championship in the 2019-21 cycle:IndiaJuly-August 2019: 2 Tests v West Indies (A)October-November 2019: 3 Tests v South Africa (H)November 2019: 2 Tests v Bangladesh (H)February 2020: 2 Tests v New Zealand (A)December 2020: 4 Tests v Australia (A)January-February 2021: 5 Tests v England (H)EnglandJuly-August 2019: 5 Tests v Australia (H)December 2019-January 2020: 4 Tests v South Africa (A)March 2020: 2 Tests v Sri Lanka (A)June-July 2020: 3 Tests v West Indies (H)July-August 2020: 3 Tests v Pakistan (H)January-February 2021: 5 Tests v India (A)AustraliaJuly-August-September 2019: 5 Tests v England (A)November 2019: 2 Tests v Pakistan (H)December 2019-January 2020: 3 Tests v New Zealand (H)February 2020: 2 Tests v Bangladesh (A)November-December 2020: 4 Tests v India (H)February-March 2021: 3 Tests v South Africa (A)South AfricaOctober 2019: 3 Tests v India (A)December 2019-January 2020: 4 Tests v England (H)July-August 2020: 2 Tests v West Indies (A)January 2021: 2 Tests v Sri Lanka (H)January-February 2021: 2 Tests v Pakistan (A)February-March 2021: 3 Tests v Australia (H)New ZealandJuly-August 2019: 2 Tests v Sri Lanka (A)December 2019-January 2020: 3 Tests v Australia (A)February 2020: 2 Tests v India (H)August-September 2020: 2 Tests v Bangladesh (A)November-December 2020: 3 Tests v West Indies (H)December 2020: 2 Tests v Pakistan (H)Sri LankaJuly-August 2019: 2 Tests v New Zealand (H)October 2019: 2 Tests v Pakistan (A)March-April 2020: 2 Tests v England (H)July-August 2020: 3 Tests v Bangladesh (H)January 2021: 2 Tests v South Africa (A)February-March 2021: 2 Tests v West Indies (A)PakistanOctober 2019: 2 Tests v Sri Lanka (H)November-December 2019: 2 Tests v Australia (A)January-February 2020: 2 Tests v Bangladesh (H)July-August 2020: 3 Tests v England (A)December 2020: 2 Tests v New Zealand (A)January-February 2021: 2 Tests v South Africa (H)BangladeshNovember 2019: 3 Tests v India (A)January-February 2020: 2 Tests v Pakistan (A)February 2020: 2 Tests v Australia (H)July-August 2020: 3 Tests v Sri Lanka (A)August-September 2020: 2 Tests v New Zealand (H)January-February 2021: 3 Tests v Windies (H)West IndiesJuly-August 2019: 2 Tests v India (H)June-July 2020: 3 Tests v England (A)July-August 2020: 2 Tests v South Africa (H)November-December 2020: 3 Tests v New Zealand (A)January-February 2021: 3 Tests v Bangladesh (A)February-March 2021: 2 Tests v Sri Lanka (H)Also Read | Sourav Ganguly surprised by absence of Shubman Gill, Ajinkya Rahane in ODI squad for West Indies tourAlso Read | Joe Root wants England to ride on World Cup win for Ashes gloryAlso See:For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAkshay Ramesh Tags :Follow World Test ChampionshipFollow India cricket teamFollow ICClast_img

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