Dozer Day is their happy place

first_imgDozer Day isn’t just a dream come true for thousands of children who want to get teeny hands on mammoth machines.It’s also a dream come true for Renee Nutter, who didn’t want to stay sidelined as a mother and the wife. She wanted to use those roles to leverage some really important results: charity for good causes, simple joy for kids.“I just want to give them fun,” she said.Dozer Day was invented in Wisconsin and adopted locally in 2005 as a fund- and profile-raiser by the Parks Foundation — which quickly found that staging a huge, kid-oriented festival of heavy machinery was prohibitively expensive and complex.But not for Clark County’s Nutter family, which operates a prominent construction company and a charitable foundation, too. When the future of Dozer Day seemed iffy, the Nutters — driven largely by Renee — stepped in and saved it.“It was going to go away, my kids were young, and I was really thinking about what my purpose in life was. I wanted to make a difference,” Renee Nutter said. “It took the right person to be passionate about it, I guess.”Not just the right individual — the right family with the right kids, who over the years have helped brainstorm continuous Dozer Day improvements. The event wouldn’t be the same now without the creative input of son and daughter Jerry and Sammi, Nutter said.last_img

first_imgDozer Day isn’t just a dream come true for thousands of children who want to get teeny hands on mammoth machines.It’s also a dream come true for Renee Nutter, who didn’t want to stay sidelined as a mother and the wife. She wanted to use those roles to leverage some really important results: charity for good causes, simple joy for kids.“I just want to give them fun,” she said.Dozer Day was invented in Wisconsin and adopted locally in 2005 as a fund- and profile-raiser by the Parks Foundation — which quickly found that staging a huge, kid-oriented festival of heavy machinery was prohibitively expensive and complex.But not for Clark County’s Nutter family, which operates a prominent construction company and a charitable foundation, too. When the future of Dozer Day seemed iffy, the Nutters — driven largely by Renee — stepped in and saved it.“It was going to go away, my kids were young, and I was really thinking about what my purpose in life was. I wanted to make a difference,” Renee Nutter said. “It took the right person to be passionate about it, I guess.”Not just the right individual — the right family with the right kids, who over the years have helped brainstorm continuous Dozer Day improvements. The event wouldn’t be the same now without the creative input of son and daughter Jerry and Sammi, Nutter said.last_img

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