Improving Healthcare Through Entrepreneurship

first_img Rest is key to optimal health and performance, says Step & Spine Physical Therapist of Sisters. Those who vow to never rest until they reach a specific health or performance goal, says physical therapist Barrett Ford, are overlooking a vital aspect of training and rehabilitation: recovery.While the owner and lead physical therapist at Step & Spine Physical Therapy (Sister and Redmond) finds the tenacity of his clients to be commendable, he’s quick to remind them that they could be putting their bodies at risk without an appropriate amount of R & R – rest and recover – on their training schedules.“It’s no doubt a good idea to be active, but it’s not always good to drive yourself every single day,” Ford said. “Overtraining can lend itself to greater fatigue, the stalling out of healing and performance potential, and even injury.”How so? According to Ford, sore muscles that aren’t given enough time to recover can cause a chain reaction throughout the body that can adversely affect focus, form, mechanics, and ultimately our joints. It’s the biomechanical slippery slope, Ford says, that can be prevented by making downtime a part of all training and recovery regimens.“When we exercise, we’re breaking down our muscles, and we must give our bodies a chance to repair,” he said. “If we don’t, our muscles won’t support the body as well, putting us at risk of poor mechanics and joint breakdown.”While there’s no tried-and-true formula for the amount of rest a person needs versus the hours he or she works out, Ford says the key is to listen to your body.“Everyone is different, so reading your body is vital,” he said. “Even if your brain may be telling you differently, let your body guide your workout and your rest.”Ford says to be aware of the following signs that your body’s ready for some R & R: You’re getting sick a lot or you feel more susceptible to illness. “When the body is repairing full time, it robs the other systems of the body,” said Ford. Tumblr Email Feeling flat or sluggish during and immediately following your workout. “You should be tired, but you should also feel energized after a workout,” Ford says. Pinterest Twitter Persistent soreness. “It’s appropriate to get sore, but you shouldn’t be painfully sore when you begin your next workout,” Ford says. Your overall performances (times, distances, endurance, etc.) are stagnant or getting worse, not better.At Step & Spine Physical Therapy, Ford treats injury and pain, but he also provides services regarding prevention, training and performance enhancement, such as properly incorporating rest and recovery into a workout routine.About Step & Spine Physical TherapyStep & Spine Physical Therapy is committed to creating individualized therapeutic plans and education that empower patients to achieve positive, long-term results. Physical therapists accomplish this through appropriate direction and treatment via mechanical diagnosis and therapy on the spine and extremities, continually striving for excellent outcomes, fewer visits and happier, more mobile patients. For more information about Step & Spine Physical Therapy, visit: www.stepandspine.com. LinkedIn Improving Healthcare Through Entrepreneurship Share. Feeling like you’re always exhausted, even after a full night’s sleep. Google+ on September 17, 2013 Facebook E-Headlines 0 By CBNlast_img

first_img Rest is key to optimal health and performance, says Step & Spine Physical Therapist of Sisters. Those who vow to never rest until they reach a specific health or performance goal, says physical therapist Barrett Ford, are overlooking a vital aspect of training and rehabilitation: recovery.While the owner and lead physical therapist at Step & Spine Physical Therapy (Sister and Redmond) finds the tenacity of his clients to be commendable, he’s quick to remind them that they could be putting their bodies at risk without an appropriate amount of R & R – rest and recover – on their training schedules.“It’s no doubt a good idea to be active, but it’s not always good to drive yourself every single day,” Ford said. “Overtraining can lend itself to greater fatigue, the stalling out of healing and performance potential, and even injury.”How so? According to Ford, sore muscles that aren’t given enough time to recover can cause a chain reaction throughout the body that can adversely affect focus, form, mechanics, and ultimately our joints. It’s the biomechanical slippery slope, Ford says, that can be prevented by making downtime a part of all training and recovery regimens.“When we exercise, we’re breaking down our muscles, and we must give our bodies a chance to repair,” he said. “If we don’t, our muscles won’t support the body as well, putting us at risk of poor mechanics and joint breakdown.”While there’s no tried-and-true formula for the amount of rest a person needs versus the hours he or she works out, Ford says the key is to listen to your body.“Everyone is different, so reading your body is vital,” he said. “Even if your brain may be telling you differently, let your body guide your workout and your rest.”Ford says to be aware of the following signs that your body’s ready for some R & R: You’re getting sick a lot or you feel more susceptible to illness. “When the body is repairing full time, it robs the other systems of the body,” said Ford. Tumblr Email Feeling flat or sluggish during and immediately following your workout. “You should be tired, but you should also feel energized after a workout,” Ford says. Pinterest Twitter Persistent soreness. “It’s appropriate to get sore, but you shouldn’t be painfully sore when you begin your next workout,” Ford says. Your overall performances (times, distances, endurance, etc.) are stagnant or getting worse, not better.At Step & Spine Physical Therapy, Ford treats injury and pain, but he also provides services regarding prevention, training and performance enhancement, such as properly incorporating rest and recovery into a workout routine.About Step & Spine Physical TherapyStep & Spine Physical Therapy is committed to creating individualized therapeutic plans and education that empower patients to achieve positive, long-term results. Physical therapists accomplish this through appropriate direction and treatment via mechanical diagnosis and therapy on the spine and extremities, continually striving for excellent outcomes, fewer visits and happier, more mobile patients. For more information about Step & Spine Physical Therapy, visit: www.stepandspine.com. LinkedIn Improving Healthcare Through Entrepreneurship Share. Feeling like you’re always exhausted, even after a full night’s sleep. Google+ on September 17, 2013 Facebook E-Headlines 0 By CBNlast_img

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