Additional Performers Added To Concert For America Stand Up Sing Out

first_imgConcert for America: Stand Up, Sing Out! has announced the full cast of artists and creators who will perform at the first concert of the monthly series, taking place today, January 20th, at The Town Hall in New York City at 3:00pm EST.The sold-out show – created and produced by Seth Rudetsky and James Wesley – will feature performances and appearances by Betty Buckley, Michelle Collins, Lilla Crawford, Brian d’Arcy James, Sharon Gless, Judy Gold, Richard Kind, Judy Kuhn, Anika Larsen, Liz Larsen, Caissie Levy, Beth Malone, Carrie Manolakos, Stephanie Mills, Jessie Mueller, Kate Mulgrew, Julia Murney, Bebe Neuwirth, Kelli O’Hara, Piper Perabo, Rosie Perez, Billy Porter, Randy Rainbow, Caroline Rhea, Alice Ripley, Chita Rivera, Shayna Steele, Brian Stokes Mitchell, Ben Vereen, Lillias White, Betsy Wolfe and more.For those who cannot attend, concerts of the monthly series will be live streamed on Concert4America2017.org. The broadcast will be directed by Emmy Award winner Debbie Miller.Proceeds benefit several national organizations working to protect human rights, including the NAACP, Planned Parenthood, Southern Poverty Law Center, National Immigration Law Center, and Sierra Club Foundation. Cornell William Brooks, President and CEO of the NAACP, will attend the concert and be a featured speaker as part of Friday’s program.Concert for America: Stand Up, Sing Out! is created and organized by Seth Rudetsky and James Wesley in association with Your Kids, Our Kids with the support of Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. Additional concert locations for the Concert for America: Stand Up, Sing Out! series will be announced in the coming weeks.last_img read more

Ban urges redoubled safety measures amid increasing violence against teachers

“Violence against teachers undermines confidence in education systems, traumatizes students, and discourages parents from sending children to school,” said a statement issued by Mr. Ban’s spokesperson.“Attacks on women teachers are particularly heinous because they disproportionately affect the girl students for whom they serve as role models,” it added. Mr. Ban’s condemnation comes on the heels of the killing of Shahnaz Nazli, a 41-year-old teacher murdered by unknown gunmen on a motorbike in the town of Shahkas, in the Khyber Agency of Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas. According to media reports, no group has so far claimed responsibility for the attack. Ms. Nazli’s death follows the killing of five teachers in January near the town of Swabi in the volatile Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, located in the north of the country near the Afghan border. In his statement, Mr. Ban called for schools to be respected as “safe and secure learning spaces” and urged local and national authorities the world over “to redouble their efforts to provide security in this area” and ensure that perpetrators of violence against teachers are brought to justice. “The international community must work together to prevent violations of the right to education,” the statement concluded. read more

Boart Longyear upgrades and expands Stage diamond coring bits for rapid exploration

first_imgBoart Longyear has upgraded and expanded its Stage® diamond coring bit product line. The new bits include engineering upgrades to the patented Stage3 waterways, a full selection of Stage bits with a 16 mm crown and an optional face-discharge feature. The company says that “since its release in 2007, the Stage3 diamond coring bit remains the world’s tallest, with a crown height of more than 25 mm. Its patented design delivers better penetration rates, longer active drilling in the hole and fewer rod trip-outs, increasing shift capacity and overall meters drilled.”“The new bits provide a benchmark for reliable, cost-effective, high-productivity drilling in any ground condition,” said Monika Portman, Product Manager for coring products with Boart Longyear. “The new design features an expansion of our patented window to improve productivity, a revised window layout to increase strength and our new patent-pending RazorCutTM face design, which provides the driller with a ready-to-cut bit right out of the box. The 16 mm model includes the upgraded Stage technology and is designed to give our customers more choice when operating at shallower target depths.”Upgrades to the Stage design include windows with rounded corners for greater durability. The new windows increase resistance to damage caused by debris in fractured ground conditions. The windows also feature a new Twin-TaperTM design to increase wear-resistance and boost performance of the bit. The Stage windows taper inward to create more material on the window’s inner diameter, increasing material strength and product life. In addition, the tapered windows cause high fluid velocity in the inner diameter resulting in better flushing of fluids, cuttings, and debris.The Stage windows are now positioned to rotate in the opposite direction of rod rotation, creating more surface material which further increases the strength of the crown, maximizing performance in all ground conditions.last_img read more

Norwegian duo Jondal – Johannessen to SG Flensburg Handewitt

Goran JohannessenMagnus JondalSG Flensburg Handewitt German vice-champions SG Flensburg Handewitt officialy announced arriving of two Norwegian NT players –  left wing Magnus Jøndal and playmaker Gøran Johannessen.GOG Handball members will join new team in summer 2o18 at the start of three years contracts.Goran Johannessen to join SG Flensburg Handewitt ← Previous Story Lagergren to replace Zelenovic at SC Magdeburg Next Story → EUPHORIA: Slovenia to play against Croatia in front of 9.000 fans read more

Sponsors and Greek government gift to Greek Community of Melbourne

first_imgThe President of the Greek Orthodox Community of Melbourne, Victoria, (GOCMV), Bill Papastergiadis has gone out knocking on doors the last few weeks and has come back with goodies. He was smiling broadly on Thursday when he announced to Neos Kosmos English Edition (NKEE) that Leonidas Argyropoulos was funding a scholarship program for Alphington Grammar to the value of $50,000. Alphington Grammar, is now in its 25th anniversary which Mr Papastergiadis said was a “significant milestone for the school.” He went on to emphasise, “This is the first scholarship program for Alphington Grammar and the funds offered by Mr Argyropoulos and his family will enable seven scholarships to be offered over a number of years.” He added, “This is a major contribution, that follows in the footsteps of the generous donation by the Andrianakos Family towards the Alphington multipurpose hall.” Mr Papastergiadis believes that Mr Argyropoulos’ gift also “confirms the general community’s support for Alphington Grammar and provides the school with an opportunity to pursue excellence in fostering scholarships for academic, sporting and other programs.” Alphington Grammar has secured a planning permit for the multipurpose hall as well as a grant by the Federal Government of $2 million towards the construction of six classrooms. Mr Argyropoulos, as was reported in a media release from the GOCMV, told the President of the Greek Community that it was “his privilege to make this contribution given the importance which Greeks place on education.” The announcement of Mr Argyropoulos gift, was followed on the heels of another announcement earlier in the week that the Greek Government was providing $25,000 for the Antipodes Festival that takes place every March. The cheque was given to Mr Papastergiadis, during a recent meeting with the General Consul of Greece in Melbourne, Christos Salamanis. Mr Papastergiadis thanked the Greek government and especially the General Secretariat of Hellenes Abroad that provided the money for their ongoing support. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Top Minds Settle on Guiding Principles for AI Development

first_img I’ve spilled a lot of ink talking about AI. I’m worried self-driving cars causing mass unemployment, I’m worried about how quickly adaptive AI is growing, and it’s pretty disconcerting to see computers match and even exceed people at things we’re supposed to the masters of — like pattern recognition and visual processing. And I’m not the only one who’s starting to sweat.As scientists, programmers and researchers assembled at the Asilomar conference last week, they worked together to come up with a list of 23 principles that they believe, should guide the development of artificial intelligence. They range from research goals to measures to ensure the benefits of AI are distributed to the whole of humanity — preventing massive powers imbalances between those that have access to computer assistance and those that don’t.Obviously guiding principles for Artificial Intelligence aren’t new. Isaac Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics perhaps being one of the most famous, but it’s also worth noting that in Asimov’s hypotheticals, those laws failed. To truly get AI right, we have to be extraordinarily careful.As people, we first need to make sure that we’re conducting ourselves ethically. It’s possible, for example, that we may create an AI whose whole existence is nothing but suffering. While that would be a boon for science, standard ethical principles forbid such tinkering. But it’s also essential that, if we do create a truly functional general artificial intelligence, we know how to help its development in ways that are mutually beneficial.That slavery is morally abhorrent is a near-universal belief, and, as a logical extension of that, it’s reasonable to ban the use of any sapient intelligence in such ways. We may not be able to conceive of what a true AI would look or act like, but few who study the topic want to press robots into practical slavery.The whole list of principles is available here, and they’re pretty extensive. It’s worth checking out just to see how the world’s best minds are approaching this problem and what this might mean for the future of robotics. It’s possible that we may yet prevent the robot apocalypse, but I’m not holding my breath. Stay on target McDonald’s Plans to Serve AI Voice Technology at Drive ThruCIMON Returns to Earth After 14 Months on ISS last_img read more

Creators Will Soon be Able to Earn Real Money on Minecraft

first_img Tom Holland’s ‘Uncharted’ Coming in 2020‘Minecraft Earth’ Is The Next ‘Pokemon Go’ We’ve seen a lot of imaginative things come out of the Minecraft community over the years. Some of the work produced by fans has definitely been on the professional level. Now, the best of the best will be able to make money from their creations. With the next game update, Mojang will introduce a marketplace on Windows 10 and mobile.Approved creators will be able to sell maps and texture packs to other users. Mojang will take a cut, but creators will get to keep a certain amount for themselves. Folks can purchase these creations with Minecraft Coins. These will function the same as currencies found in other mobile games. If you play Minecraft on Xbox, you’ll need an Xbox Live Silver or Gold account in order to make purchases on the new marketplace.There will be two partner creators when the marketplace launches. One partner is Blockworks, which is a group known for creating RPG-themed maps. The other is pixel artist Eneija Silverleaf, who has made several different skins for the game. As the marketplace grows, there will no doubt be more partner creators who are signed up — especially if they highly talented.Creating things in Minecraft is no small feat. Being compensated for one’s hard work will certainly be something creators will appreciate. Monetary compensation will no doubt lead to other talented folks jumping on Minecraft to see if they make some moolah with their blocky creations. Minecraft is still insanely popular, and having a marketplace of this sort ensures that the game is around for a long time.As of now, the marketplace will only be available to Windows 10 and mobile users. No word yet on whether or not Minecraft players on other platforms will be getting this marketplace. We’ll keep you posted on that as we get word from Mojang. Stay on targetlast_img read more

Some Alaska Lawmakers Say New Ethics Rules Are Too Limiting

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Alaska state Sen. Shelley Hughes withdrew a health care bill she’s been working on for more than two years and declined meetings on health care policy to avoid running afoul of new ethics rules she and other lawmakers see as too restrictive. Lawmakers with conflicts can have general discussions in private that avoid specifics of pending legislation or that aren’t used to develop legislation related to their conflict, legislative ethics committee administrator Jerry Anderson said.But, some lawmakers worry, if the seed for an eventual bill is sown during a general conversation, could that be a violation? That’s a realistic concern, Anderson said. The ethics committee’s interpretation acts to “kind of kick common sense out the door,” the Anchorage independent said. He lost his re-election bid in November but said he’s spoken with current legislators about possible revisions. Under the legislative ethics committee’s interpretation of the law, legislators can participate in committee and floor debate and vote on bills where they have conflicts, as long as they declare those conflicts. But they can’t have similar discussions in private with fellow lawmakers or anyone else.The bill’s sponsor said that goes far beyond his original intent, and he and others are looking at possible changes. In a speech to colleagues, Hughes said she withdrew her bill aimed at lowering health care costs because her husband and the clinic where he works could be financially harmed by it, and that was seen as a conflict. The definition used by the Select Committee on Legislative Ethics for “official action” is broad, including development, sponsorship, advocacy of or opposition to a law, amendment, resolution or other matter affected by legislative action or inaction. Senate Majority Leader Mia Costello said legislators are erring on the side of caution and in some cases declining meetings. “When it comes to private discussions, you have to have some level of trust with our elected officials,” Grenn said. Costello is an Anchorage Republican who flies, is married to a commercial pilot and represents a district that holds Alaska’s largest commercial airport. In a floor speech, she said she intended to introduce a bill that would have given the Legislature approval of certain aviation-related fees, but didn’t because of the new law. The Legislature needs to find the right language “to ensure that we protect the right of the public to have legislators with integrity on one hand and on the other hand protect the right of the public to have access to the expertise of the people they elect,” he said. “That, believe me, is a fine line, and we must find it.” Former Rep. Jason Grenn, who sponsored the ethics law, said he intended for it to force legislators to be more public about potential conflicts in committees and on the House or Senate floor — and didn’t intend to delve into private meetings. The law bars legislators from taking or withholding official action or exerting official influence that could substantially hurt or help the financial interests of an immediate family member; the employer of a lawmaker or their immediate family; someone with whom a lawmaker is seeking employment; or someone from whom the lawmaker or an immediate family member has made more than $10,000 over the prior 12 months. The ethics law passed last year details circumstances under which a lawmaker would have a conflict and limits what action the lawmaker can take if he or she has one. Senate Democratic Leader Tom Begich, who serves on the ethics committee, cautioned against “over-interpreting” the new law and said legislators with questions can check with Anderson’s office. Hughes said the law prevents her from discussing health care policy with her husband, a physician assistant. Ethics laws should keep lawmakers from manipulating the system for their own gain, Hughes said. “But when the law prevents us from drawing from our own experience … and from the knowledge that we gain from living with the people we love, it needs to be fixed,” the Palmer Republican said. “When the law prevents us from working in the best interests of the people we serve … to address the problems they face, the law needs to be fixed.” Grenn said the aim was public transparency, not trying to address any potential corruption that other laws or rules already address. “Everything we do, we’re wondering, can I do that? Can I talk to this person?” Costello said in an interview, adding later: “We don’t want to overreact, either. I don’t think we are doing anything but trying to figure out right now what this actually means.” Begich is open to changes that clarify the law but not a wholesale rewrite. The state does not have a full-time Legislature. Some lawmakers have other jobs, including attorneys, fishermen and a doctor. Some also have working spouses.last_img read more

PMMI Buys Summit Media

first_imgPublisher-association relationships aren’t foreign to the B2B world, but they rarely go this far.PMMI, a trade group for packaging and processing technologies, has agreed to purchase Summit Media Group, a publisher with five titles in the same space.Terms weren’t disclosed, though the deal is expected to close next month. Summit staff and leadership will become employees of the association, with operations remaining headquartered in Chicago. The deal immediately gives PMMI, producer of five trade shows, an established year-round, multi-platform connection to its audience—something the company had been exploring on its own for the last 18 months, says Charles D. Yuska, president and CEO of PMMI.“A robust publishing and multimedia presence will be the foundation of our efforts to build a year-round audience for our tradeshows and other products,” he says. “Building a platform would take several years and a significant financial investment with no guarantee of success. On the other hand, purchasing an existing, successful entity would mean much greater speed to market and a faster return on our financial investment.”While integration on the marketing front is a central part of the deal, show sales will continue on separately from media sales for now, Yuska says, though cross-platform buys will be available.The merger makes PMMI’s own magazine, PMT, redundant however. It’ll be absorbed into Summit’s title, Packaging World.last_img read more

99 Restaurant To Host Fundraiser For Northside PAC On May 29

first_imgLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWHS Local Heroes Club To Hold Fundraiser To Benefit Veterans At 99 Restaurant On Sept. 11In “Community”99 Restaurant To Host Fundraiser For Northside PAC On March 5In “Community”99 Restaurant To Host Fundraiser For Cops With Kids For Cancer On June 5In “Community” WILMINGTON, MA — The Northside PAC is holding a “Dining For A Cause” fundraiser at the Ninety Nine Restaurant (144 Lowell Street) on Wednesday, May 29, 2019, from 4pm to 11pm.15% of your bill will be donated to the Parent Advisory Council if you present the flyer below to your server/host.  The donation applies to both dine-on AND take-out orders.  No coupons, discounts or promotions are accepted during the fundraiser.last_img read more

Your PC in 2008 and Beyond

first_img Brought to you by PCWorld The world of science fiction is rapidly becoming fact, from tabletops that charge your laptop wirelessly to wall-mounted PCs that recognize your face and gestures. Thanks to breakthroughs in miniaturization, you’ll be able to tuck products into your pocket that wouldn’t have fit into your briefcase a few years ago, such as projectors and photo printers. The next generation of Internet technology will change everything from TV to Coke machines. And standard computer building blocks are growing ever more powerful, as processor makers squeeze more cores onto each chip and drive makers pack more bits into each platter–guaranteeing that even ordinary PCs of the future will be anything but ordinary.In the pages that follow, we spotlight a dozen major innovations, from ones right around the corner to a few that won’t show up until at least 2012. On multiple fronts, the future you’ve been waiting for has almost arrived. Here’s what you need to know to prepare for it.Kiss Your Power Cord Good-ByeYou hardly think twice about connecting your wireless laptop to the Internet, but you still have to fumble for a power cord when your battery runs out. How quaint. Soon all those cumbersome power bricks will be just a footnote in your grandchildren’s history books, as wireless charging comes to market.What is it? Currently two ways to accomplish wireless charging exist. Inductive charging works by matching the resonance of the charging pad’s electromagnetic field to that of the battery, allowing the battery to charge over a small physical gap. In contrast, conductive charging passes electricity directly between two surfaces in contact. Which method will win out is not yet clear, but in either case you’ll be able to simply place your laptop, phone, and music player onto a universal wireless charging pad that will immediately begin juicing them up.When is it coming? Next year both inductive and conductive charging technologies will emerge onto the market, but most devices will require a $30 adapter to work with them. WildCharge expects to roll out its first conductive-charging notebook product (paired with a compatible notebook) in time for 2008’s back-to-school season, while eCoupled is pushing to get its inductive technology into cars, countertops, and desk surfaces by 2009. Look for wireless charging to become commonplace in 2010, after major phone and laptop vendors sign on to support it.Print From Anywhere (and Anything)Forget about running home to print out your photos or–gasp!–ordering prints online. The next generation of mobile devices will come with their own built-in printers.What is it? Zink (short for “Zero Ink”) Imaging, a spin-off of Polaroid, has been working on a new way of making photo paper. Zink paper has a crystal substrate sandwiched between its layers that colorizes as it passes through a slim-profile printer. The printers themselves are so small that you can slip one in your pocket, and they can easily be built into cameras, laptops, or other devices.When is it coming? In 2008, Zink will partner with a major camera vendor (name not announced) to release the first pocket-size digital camera with a built-in printer. This early model will produce 2-by-3-inch photos. At the same time, the company will begin selling a tiny handheld printer (probably for about $99) for camera phones; it’ll print adhesive-backed photos that will likely grace the school binders of many eighth-graders. Two or three years after that, the technology may be integrated into laptops and other mobile devices.Great Graphics Inside”Integrated graphics” has long been synonymous with “sluggish graphics.” But soon the phrase will have a whole new meaning, thanks to new CPUs with powerful graphics hardware built in.What is it? AMD’s acquisition of ATI brought the company’s rivalry with Intel–which already made its own basic graphics chips–to a new level. Since then the two competitors each have been working to bridge the gap between CPUs and graphics processors. Building graphics-processing functionality directly into a CPU eliminates the delay you’d otherwise experience as data passes between the CPU and GPU across the system bus. Such combined CPU/GPUs will feature DirectX 10 support and acceleration for Blu-ray and HD-DVD while consuming substantially less power, requiring less space on the motherboard, and performing significantly better than most of today’s discrete graphics cards do.When is it coming? Intel plans to put its graphics-integrated Nehalem processors into production in 2008, beginning with a line of server chips. AMD intends to release its integrated Puma notebook platform about the same time. In 2009, Intel will bring its graphics-integrated chips to desktops and notebooks, while AMD’s Puma will likely reach desktops in 2010.Screens Get the BendsThe smaller and more powerful devices become, the harder they are to use. Tiny screens just don’t cut it when you want to do real work. But if your phone or PDA came with a large roll-out display, you could work in comfort without sacrificing portability. That’s where flexible polymers will come in.What is it? Display manufacturers make traditional LCD screens by sandwiching liquid crystals between layers of glass and then zapping them with electricity. Replacing that glass with plastic makes things a little more malleable. Initially developed by E Ink and Philips, so-called electronic paper compresses organic light-emitting diode (OLED) crystals between very thin layers of polymer, allowing for tremendous flexibility. Unlike conventional LCD screens, such ultrathin displays are completely shatterproof, and can even be rolled up into tight spools. The result is a wide-screen monitor that you can carry in your pocket and use anywhere. Better still, such screens will be cheaper and easier to manufacture than today’s flat panels–they’ll simply be printed directly onto sheets of plastic.When is it coming? First-generation flexible displays are already here–they’re just not that flexible yet. E Ink’s electronic paper can be found in such nonflexible products as the $300 Sony Reader and the $130 Motorola Motofone F3. The first actually rollable displays, created by the labs of Philips’s Holland-based spin-off Polymer Vision, will reach the market in 2008: A cell phone from Telecom Italia will carry the world’s first Polymer Vision roll-up display. Currently under wraps, the phone (pricing not yet available) is expected to offer a 5-inch, 320-by-240-pixel, monochrome rollable display. By 2010, Polymer Vision expects to market larger color displays with much higher resolution.The First Real Net PhonesSimple wireless calling satisfied users during the first generation of cell phones, but the second generation (2G) made things more interesting with the introduction of SMS messaging and WAP Internet browsing. 2.5G added pictures and video, but at speeds that feel more like dial-up than broadband. (That’s the main problem with the iPhone’s data service.) With 3G, higher-bandwidth connections have made 2.5G’s multimedia capabilities palatable. 4G will be a whole lot cooler.What is it? The fundamental difference between 4G and 3G is the way in which the networks will be switched. Until now, most phone networks (except for VoIP) have been circuit switched, meaning a dedicated circuit is activated between the callers. This outdated method puts voice calls in a category all their own, distinct from data connections, and prevents cell phones from transmitting voice calls and data simultaneously. 4G networks will be IP switched, just like all the traffic on the Internet. That not only means that you’ll be able to talk and text at the same time, but also that your 4G device will be able to do far more on the network than it can today. IP-switched cellular networks will work more as ISPs do, allowing for greater flexibility in running data applications. Just about any device–from a phone to a laptop to a Coke machine–will be able to connect to the network, and you’ll be able to do just about anything with it. Another result of this flexibility: Wireless carriers will likely be forced to loosen their iron grip on the services customers can use over their networks, giving everyone more freedom to communicate from the road.When is it coming? The four major U.S. wireless carriers are just scratching the surface of what their 3G networks can do, and most consumers seem uninterested in more-advanced data streaming. But the underlying technology for 4G networks, WiMax, exists now and is slowly growing in large enterprise networks and telecom companies. WiMax itself is not a cellular technology, however, and before a fourth-gen cellular network can evolve, the industry will need to find a new telecommunications protocol to base it on. As business users increase their demand for high-end wireless data services, cellular carriers will begin to deploy networks and devices that deliver 4G service. We expect the first handsets and data cards to hit the market in 2011.Enter the Octagon CPURegardless of what Moore’s Law has to say, there’s not much point in increasing processor speeds or doubling the bit paths in a CPU if the system bus can’t carry the traffic anyway. Since problems with transistors leaking current also worsen as clock speeds increase and CPUs shrink, both AMD and Intel have decided to focus on increasing the number of processor cores on a chip instead of increasing processor speeds.What is it? The centerpiece of any given CPU is the processor core, which is responsible for the actual calculations that make all of your software run. Placing multiple cores on a single chip dramatically increases the number of calculations that can be performed, without having to raise the clock speed of the chip itself. By keeping clock speeds relatively low while increasing the number of calculations performed simultaneously, chip makers overcome the inevitable overheating problems associated with faster clock speeds. And the more cores a manufacturer crams onto a single chip, the faster the CPU can go. The performance boost isn’t one-to-one, however: Intel’s four-core 2.66-GHz Core 2 Quad Q6700 performs just 26 percent faster than its same-speed, two-core Core 2 Duo E6700 on certain applications, according to the company (see the results of PC World tests). So while you will see improvement with eight-core CPUs, the speedup won’t be as dramatic as it might sound.When is it coming? Before AMD can start selling eight-core chips for the desktop, it needs to get its quad-core Phenom chips to market in 2008. Intel has been selling quad-core desktop processors for about a year now, and it has announced eight-core chips for servers in 2008. Expect OctoCore–or whatever the company ends up calling it–to come to desktops in 2010.Put Your TV AnywhereDespite the wireless revolution happening all around your home, your high-def television remains shamefully hard-wired in place. Wouldn’t it be great if you could put your TV anywhere you wanted, without worrying about where the cable jack was, and still get top-notch video quality? Soon you’ll be able to do just that.What is it? Wireless High-Definition Interface (WHDI) is a cable-free replacement for HDMI that uses a 5-GHz radio transmitter to send an uncompressed 1080p, 30-fps high-def video signal from a WHDI-equipped DVD player, game console, or set-top box, for example, to a WHDI-equipped TV across a distance of up to 100 feet. Because the WHDI signal is compatible with HDMI, you’ll be able to buy HDMI wireless modems for your existing entertainment gear–and that means you can finally rearrange your furniture the way you’d really like it, without having to run additional cables through your walls.When is it coming? Amimon, which manufactures the WHDI chip set, released the technology to electronics makers at the end of August. Now the race is on to bring WHDI to market. TV makers have already begun demoing new wireless-equipped HDTV models at trade shows, and fans of bleeding-edge tech should be able to get their hands on hardware by the start of the new year. WHDI is expected to add about $200 to the cost of a new TV, so expect to pay a premium for the technology in 2008. WHDI modems for your existing hardware will likely cost $300 to $400 for a pair of adapters (you need at least two–a receiver for the TV and a transmitter for your set-top box, for example–to get started). In a few years, says Amimon vice president of marketing Noam Geri, costs should drop to about $10 for inclusion in a TV and $60 for the adapters.Five Terabytes per DriveEven if you’re not a digital pack rat, you probably still manage to cram a lot of data onto your hard drive. Digital photos, movies, music, and overflowing e-mail folders can pile on the gigabytes before you know it. But don’t worry: Way bigger hard drives are on the horizon.What is it? Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording, or HAMR (and a nearly identical technology called Thermally Assisted Magnetic Recording), uses lasers to heat the surface of a drive’s platters, making it possible to pack a terabyte of data onto a single square inch of drive surface, roughly twice the current limit. As the drive’s read/write head goes about its business, it briefly fires its laser at the surface, destabilizing the iron-platinum particles for reading and writing. With the platter heated, the read/write head can manipulate the surface on a very fine scale–in just tens of nanometers–letting it cram enormous amounts of information into a small space. A few nanoseconds after the work is done, the surface cools for long-term stability. The way data is organized on a disc will change, as well: Rather than having arbitrarily arranged disk sectors, HAMR drives will work with the natural grain of the disk surface, organizing data into self-arranging magnetic arrays that allow the creation of a single bit of data on every grain of the platter’s surface.When is it coming? HAMR is still very much a research project, but it should be coming to market in the next several years. Seagate expects to introduce 5TB HAMR hard drives by 2011, with capacities of up to 37.5TB to follow a few years after that.A Better InternetTCP/IP, the technology on which the entire Internet is based, is no spring chicken. The current version of the Internet protocol, IPv4, has been around for more than 25 years. The old technology suffers from some serious limitations–including a shortage of addresses for all the computers that use it. Internet Protocol version 6 will change all that.What is it? Unlike IPv4, which uses 32-bit addresses like 155.54.210.63, IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses like 2001:0ba0:01e0:d001:0000:0000:d0f0:0010. This small, simple change permits every person in the world–and even every computer in the world–to have a unique IP address. In addition, IPv6 features network-layer encryption and authentication, enabling secure communications between parties.When is it coming? IPv6 is here right now, and has been for several years, but almost nobody is using it yet because the hardware needed for it remains more expensive than that for IPv4, and few network administrators are trained to manage it. However, the United States government has declared that it will move all of its networks to IPv6 by the summer of 2008, which even at government speeds means the technology should arrive in time to pick up the slack when the pool of available addresses runs out around March 2011. The depletion of addresses should also induce your ISP to update its network before long.A PC in Every SurfaceThough it seems second nature to us now, the idea of manipulating images on a screen by moving around an input device–a mouse–on the desk was revolutionary when Douglas Engelbart introduced it in 1964. But as well as it works, the mouse is still a surrogate for a far more natural human interface, the fingertip. Over the next few years, a new category of PCs will put your fingers in control.What is it? Tabletop computing (aka surface computing) gets back to basics by letting you gather around a table with some friends for some good old-fashioned interactivity. Accepting a variety of input types simultaneously, tabletop PCs allow multiple users to work with data projected onto the surface of the table by touching on-screen objects with their fingertips. Many companies are working on tabletop computing technologies, but two of the leading efforts are Microsoft’s camera-driven Surface PC and Mitsubishi Electronics Research Labs’ RF-driven DiamondTouch. Surface PCs use rear projection to present an image on the surface of the table from inside, while five infrared cameras in the table track finger movements on the screen. DiamondTouch projects the image from above the table and uses capacitive coupling (like that employed in laptop touchpads) to follow your fingertips–with this design, though, you create shadows when you touch it.When is it coming? MERL’s DiamondTouch is still predominantly a research project, but Microsoft’s Surface PC will arrive this year at a hotel, casino, or cellular store near you. First-generation Surface PCs will be strictly for showcasing in public locations, but Microsoft expects to offer a conference-room version for businesses by 2010. Home users will get them three to five years from now. Eventually, says Microsoft, you can expect to have Surface PCs built into countertops, mirrors, or just about any other flat spot in your home.Put Your Data in the Fast LaneAs CPUs grow more powerful and graphics cards rocket toward ever higher levels of realism and detail, a significant bottleneck in your PC’s data flow remains: the system bus. When data travels through your PC, it’s the system bus–not the processor–that limits overall performance. What you need is a faster bus.What is it? PCI Express (PCIe) is the leading system bus architecture for high-end hardware such as graphics cards. The current specification, version 2.3, offers a data transfer rate of 5.2 gigabits per second. The next generation, PCI 3.0, will offer a data rate of 8 gbps. In addition to supporting much higher GPU performance, a key benefit of PCIe 3.0 may be the ability to power graphics cards directly from the system bus, rather than requiring a line into the power supply. But there’s a catch: In order to support the higher data rates, the architecture will no longer work with the older 5-volt hardware used on PCIe versions 1.1 and 2.0. Whereas PCIe 2.3 supports both 5V and 3.3V cards, PCIe 3.0 will be 3.3V only. That means most current 5V hardware will be obsolete when PCIe 3.0 debuts.When is it coming? PCI-SIG, the group that oversees PCI architecture specifications, expects to release the final PCIe 3.0 spec in 2009. PCIe 3.0 graphics cards should hit the market in 2010.Pocket PresentationsWatching video on a cell phone is a pain. Even if you find the content you want, the tiny screen makes enjoying the program difficult. Before long, however, you’ll be seeing shows right-sized again, thanks to your projector-equipped cell phone.What is it? Microvision Pico projectors employ light scanning technology to generate a complete, full-color image from a beam of light. Within the device it’s embedded in, a single red, green, or blue laser bounces off a tiny scanning mirror that oscillates vertically and horizontally to render the image pixel by pixel, producing a larger picture that projects onto a wall or other surface (as large as 120 inches, from 12 feet away in a darkened room). Controlling the scanner, the light source, and the optics is the PicoP engine, which coordinates the various components to control the intensity of each beam of light to create thousands of colors. By using a single beam of light rather than three beams, Microvision is able to make the projectors small enough to fit into cell phones without appreciably increasing the size of the phones. And the company even expects the integrated projectors to play a feature-length movie on just one cell phone charge.When is it coming? Microvision has partnered with Motorola to build Pico projectors into mobile phones, and the first projector-equipped model is expected to debut in 2009. Meanwhile, the company is designing a projector accessory for PCs and game consoles that should be available by the end of 2008. Built-in projectors can be expected to add as much as $150 to the price of a phone, while accessory projectors will likely cost around $200, says Avi Greengart, principal analyst for mobile devices at Current Analysis and editor of the Home Theater View blog.Tech Beyond 2010Gigabit Internet (2012): Dogged by the speed of your home broadband service? With a gigabit Internet connection over a fiber-optic line, you’ll be able to download the latest movies in less than a minute at speeds up to 1 gbps.Mobile fuel cells (2013): Now in development, hydrogen fuel cells will power your laptop for a week at a time using store-bought fuel cartridges.Smart homes (2014): We’ve heard for years about the smart home–a house chock-full of computer-driven appliances that cater to your every need. As homes with built-in ethernet wiring become more common in several years, central home PCs will control everything from the thermostat to the lighting to the security system.Probe storage (2015): Code-named Millipede, the probe storage system being developed by IBM will use atomic force microscopy (think itsy-bitsy dots) to store more than a terabyte of data per square inch on a polymer surface. An array of thousands of little probes will be able to read and write large amounts of that data far more quickly than today’s drives can.Nano lightning systems (2015): It has “lightning” right in the name, so you know it’s cool, but it’s really about cooling off your hardware. Microscopic nanotubes will use an electrical charge to generate tiny wind currents on the surface of your chips to cool them down without the aid of fans.Hot ProductsImpatient for the future? These items are due in the next few months.Microsoft Windows Vista SP1: Early in 2008, Microsoft is expected to release its first service pack for Windows Vista. The update will likely include fixes for everything from User Account Control to DirectX 10 performance, as well as a few interface tweaks.Apple Mac OS X Leopard: It’s been a long time coming, but Apple’s latest revision of OS X, version 10.5 ($129), may be available by the time you read this. It includes an enhanced interface with a transparent menu bar, stackable menus, dynamic workspaces, and the Time Machine file-restoration tool.HP MediaSmart Server: Based on Microsoft’s Windows Home Server platform, MediaSmart Server–starting at $599 and due out late this fall–will deliver pictures, music, and movies to devices around the home.Super Talent 32GB SSD 2.5-inch SATA: The 32GB Super Talent drive is one of the first flash-based drives. But early adopters beware: The $500 price tag is likely to drop, particularly after 128GB drives from mainstream makers hit the market next year.Electronic Arts Crysis: Hitting shelves November 16, the $59 sequel to Far Cry looks to be the most visually stunning PC game ever. Developer Crytek has taken full advantage of DirectX 10 graphics technology, offering realism and detail unlike anything we’ve seen.Battles to WatchHere are the top technology fights to follow in the coming years.AMD vs. Intel: Though Intel currently has the performance edge with its Core 2 line and its quad processor, AMD will soon counter with the release of its own quad-core Phenom chips. Expect things to heat up in a big way with the release of consumer graphics-integrated CPUs in 2009.DRM vs. unrestricted access: Will user outrage prompt entertainment resellers to come up with a sensible copy-protection scheme, or will corporations overrun fair-use rights with pay-per-play media services? We’re putting our money on a compromise between the two, as some labels have already begun offering DRM-free music through iTunes and other services in response to consumer demand for more flexible formats.Windows vs. Mac vs. Linux: IDC estimates Apple’s market share at roughly 5 percent in the United States, while Linux is gaining popularity around the world, particularly with governments and educational institutions. Most estimates still peg Linux desktop users at around 1 percent of the market, but the numbers appear to be climbing. This year, Dell and Lenovo gave Linux desktop users a boost by adding to their product lines systems with Linux preinstalled.Microsoft vs. Google: Microsoft’s long-standing dominance in the office-productivity software arena is facing new threats from the likes of Google, which offers its own productivity suite–Google Docs–online. While Docs has yet to make significant inroads against Microsoft Office, Microsoft’s efforts to beat Google at its own game with Live.com have yet to bear fruit. CEO Steve Ballmer’s July announcement that Microsoft will begin shifting to a “Web-enabled desktop” in the coming years suggests that the company takes Google’s threat seriously.Overhyped TrendsHere are three allgedly hot topics we’re tired of hearing about.Microblogging: What are you doing right now? If the answer is “Washing my poodle in the kitchen sink,” we’d rather not know. With short attention spans becoming the norm, services like Twitter and Pownce probably aren’t going away anytime soon–but they’re not very useful, either.UMPCs: In 2005, Microsoft announced a bold new standard for mobile devices known as the Ultra-Mobile PC. Armed with touch screens, GPS, and Wi-Fi, these not-quite-tablet PCs were supposed to revolutionize how and where people compute. But by delivering a platform that’s too small for true productivity and too large for genuine mobility, Microsoft ensured that the UMPC was pretty much dead on arrival, and new designs have done little to arouse consumer interest–Palm recently scrapped plans for the Foleo, a device with similar dimensions.Kitchen PCs: For a while now, certain trade shows have been annual love-ins for companies hyping a future full of household appliances with built-in computers. In all these years, however, the best thing we’ve seen is LG’s LSC27990, a $4000 icebox with a 15-inch LCD screen crammed into the door. It’s mildly interesting to be able to watch a ballgame or get birthday reminders and weather reports while you’re standing in front of the fridge (assuming you have a cable outlet tucked behind your appliance nook); but these overpriced, barely functional computers amount to little more than amusing proof-of-concept novelties. They’re a far cry from the true smart appliances of the future.Overdue TechAfter years of waiting for these promising technologies, we think they’re still far from mainstream.WiMax: Back in 2003, WiMax was heralded as the ultimate solution to the world’s connectivity problems, capable of covering an entire city with ubiquitous broadband. WiMax today, however, is little more than an IT backbone for long-distance line-of-sight wide-area networks, largely because it’s not very effective for the kinds of mobile devices that most people use for wireless Internet service. The basic technology of WiMax may yet evolve as part of future 4G cellular networks, but that’s still a long way off.IPTV: Oh, how we’ve hungered for the video nirvana that IPTV has been promising. But while Verizon’s FiOS TV and AT&T’s U-Verse are finally rolling out, they’ve yet to produce the amazing lineup of HD channels, on-demand shows, integrated gaming, and digital voice calling the companies claimed would come, and they’re still anything but ubiquitous. Meanwhile, digital cable has evolved enough to take some of the wind out of IPTV’s sails.RFID: If early predictions were to be believed, today you would be walking through the grocery store filling up your cart as tiny radio frequency identification (RFID) tags announced the contents of the cart and an RFID-enabled credit card automatically paid the bill. Ummm, nope. The biggest holdup has come from the very companies attempting to roll out the technology, with industry infighting over standardization keeping RFID on the shelf.Virtual reality: Second Life boasts a 3D space in which users can buy and sell property, create objects, and socialize, but its relatively crude graphics still feel more virtual than real. Virtual reality as folks imagined it in the 1990s isn’t likely to emerge until someone invents a wearable display that people will actually wear. At least we have World of Warcraft. 15+ min read The pace of everyday living may be hectic, but the pace of innovation is downright frenetic. Technologies barely imagined a few years ago are now poised to change the face of computing, as digital devices continue to burrow into every aspect of daily life. Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.center_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals September 26, 2007 Register Now »last_img read more

Societies Call for Focus on Radiation Dose Optimization in Nuclear Cardiology

first_imgNews | Nuclear Imaging | January 05, 2017 Societies Call for Focus on Radiation Dose Optimization in Nuclear Cardiology January 5, 2017 — Working in concert, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC)’s Nuclear/PET accreditation division and the Society of Nuclear Medicine in Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) are mandating optimized radiation doses in conjunction with the nuclear cardiology studies (i.e., myocardial perfusion imaging) performed throughout the United States and beyond.These efforts come in response to recently published research[1,2] demonstrating that adherence to clinical nuclear imaging guidelines for reduced patient radiation exposure is variably implemented, resulting in administration of higher doses than necessary for some patients undergoing myocardial perfusion studies. In February 2016, ASNC published guidelines for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging, ASNC Imaging Guidelines for SPECT Nuclear Cardiology Procedures: Stress Protocols and Tracers, which include a chart entitled “Current SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Protocols: Recommended Radiopharmaceutical Activities and Their Corresponding Radiation Effective Doses.” These recommendations provide guidance for practitioners and are based on ASNC’s guiding principle of performing the most appropriate study that provides the highest quality data to aid in medical decision-making and minimizes risks to patients. Dose reduction strategies based on weight-based radiotracer dosing, thoughtful selection of radiotracer, stress-only imaging when appropriate, software innovations, state-of-the-art SPECT systems and utilization of PET for myocardial perfusion imaging are all methods supported by ASNC to achieve quality cardiac imaging at the lowest radiation exposure.“ASNC is committed to supporting nuclear cardiac imaging labs’ use of the lowest radiotracer dose that maintains diagnostic image quality, in conjunction with application of appropriate use criteria (AUC) and the use of count recovery software for general SPECT cameras, new solid state SPECT cameras, and PET to provide the right test for the right patient,” said Brian G. Abbott, M.D., FACC, MASNC, ASNC president.To ensure that facilities seeking nuclear cardiology accreditation focus their awareness on the patient dose they are administering, the September 2016 published revision to the IAC Standards and Guidelines for Nuclear/PET Accreditation is inclusive of required administered dose ranges as recommended by the 2016 ASNC guidelines. In accordance with the IAC’s mission of improving healthcare through accreditation®, the IAC Nuclear/PET Board of Directors has made the decision to mandate specific dose ranges for myocardial perfusion imaging studies to decrease radiation exposure while maintaining image quality, thus ensuring patient safety. “Our ultimate goal is to ensure that nuclear cardiology facilities are guided to administer the lowest dose possible that provides optimal imaging results for patients referred for myocardial perfusion imaging studies,” said Scott D. Jerome, DO, FACC, FASNC, FSCCT, IAC Nuclear/PET presidentSpeaking on behalf of the SNMMI, President Sally W. Schwarz, MS, RPh, BCNP, stated, “Working together, we can more effectively ensure that health care providers meet accreditation requirements and follow dose guidelines for nuclear cardiology. The goal is to keep radiation exposure as low as is reasonable.” Frederic H. Fahey, DSc, FSNMMI, who serves on SNMMI’s Dose Optimization Task Force, added, “Accreditation requirements and dosing guidelines emphasize both patient safety and quality images. Our focus must always be on providing the highest quality care in the safest manner possible.”ASNC is a leader in quality, education, advocacy and standards in cardiovascular imaging, with nearly 4,000 members worldwide. For more information, visit www.asnc.org.IAC is a nonprofit organization offering accreditation programs for vascular testing, echocardiography, nuclear/PET, MRI, diagnostic CT, dental CT, carotid stenting, vein treatment and management and cardiac electrophysiology. For more information: intersocietal.org. SNMMI is an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to raising public awareness about nuclear medicine and molecular imaging. SNMMI’s more than 17,000 members set the standard for molecular imaging and nuclear medicine practice by creating guidelines, sharing information through journals and meetings and leading advocacy on key issues that affect molecular imaging. For more information: snmmi.org.References:1. Jerome SD, Tilkemeier PL, Farrell, MB, Shaw LJ. “Nationwide Laboratory Adherence to Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Radiation Dose Reduction Practices: A Report From the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission Data Repository.” J Am Coll Cardiol Img. 2015;8(10):1170-1176. doi:10.1016/j.jcmg.2015.07.008 2. Mathew Mercuri; Thomas N. B. Pascual; John J. Mahmarian; Leslee J. Shaw; et al. for the INCAPS Investigators Group. “Comparison of Radiation Doses and Best-Practice Use for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in US and Non-US Laboratories/ Findings From the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study.” JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176(2):266-269. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.7102.)  FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate read more Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | August 02, 2019 ASRT Supports Radiopharmaceutical Reimbursement Bill The American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) announced its support for House Resolution (HR) 3772, a measure… read more News | PET-CT | August 15, 2019 United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Installation of uExplorer Total-body PET/CT United Imaging announced that its uExplorer total-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) system… read more News | Interventional Radiology | July 31, 2019 International Multidisciplinary Group Publishes Recommendations for Personalized HCC Treatment With Y90 TheraSphere New consensus recommendations for personalized treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with BTG’s TheraSphere have… read more center_img Video Player is loading.ITN Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance AthletesPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 11:59Loaded: 1.36%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -11:59 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more Related Content Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read morelast_img read more

British target Aussies with cooperative campaign

first_img“The kangaroo route has brought many millions of Australian residents to London since the 1930’s and last year Australia was London’s 4th biggest market for tourism expenditure, generating £470 million and the 7th biggest visitor market with 600,000 visitors coming to London from Australia,” London & Partners director consumer marketing and digital channels Julie Chappell said. Virgin Atlantic, VisitBritain and London & Partners team for new marketing strategy. Over the last five years, passenger numbers from Australia have steadily improved, while expenditure has grown by 52 percent. “Last year was a record year for Virgin Atlantic on the Kangaroo route… our passenger numbers travelling through to the UK increased by more than 20,000 people and we saw a marked improvement in our market share to London,” Virgin Atlantic general manager Australia and New Zealand Luke Fisher said. More than 3 million Australians have visited London since 2008, spending £2.2 billion in the capital.center_img Virgin Atlantic has partnered with VisitBritain and London & Partners to release a co-branded marketing campaign to drive additional tourism from Australia to London and the United Kingdom. The combined strategy, ‘Flying in the face of ordinary to Britain’ will commence from 2 September 2013, featuring discounted fares and promoted offline and online; primarily with Yahoo! 7, BBC.com and Ninemsn Gourmet Traveller. Source = ETB News: P.T.last_img read more

JNTO conducts Japan Travel Seminar 2019 in New Delhi

first_imgInternational High-speed Rail Association (IHRA) and Embassy of Japan in India in collaboration with Japan National Tourism Organization (JNTO), conducted a Japan Travel Seminar 2019 recently, ‘The Shinkansen – Make your way through Japan with a high-speed Train’, at The Lalit, New Delhi.The key agents of New Delhi were invited to the event. The objective of the seminar was to introduce, promote Japan tourism in India and help Indian travellers know about the rich cultural heritage of the country and for travellers to explore it through the high-speed train.The opening ceremony was kicked off by a welcome greeting by Masafumi Shukuri, Chairman, IHRA; Kenko Sone, Minister, Embassy of Japan and Suman Billa, Joint Secretary, Minister of Tourism, Government of India. This was followed by a brief presentation by Mamoru Kobori, Executive Vice- President, JNTO and Akihiko Tamura, Former Japan Tourism Agency Commissioner.“The Shinkansen, commonly known as a high-speed train, is the safest and the most reliable mode of transport within Japan. The aim of the high-speed train is to shorten the time people spend travelling from one destination to another. The high-speed train may change the way tourists travel, leaving more time for them to enjoy the destination. It plays a very prominent role in the country’s economy and lifestyle. Even India has decided to have its own high-speed rail between Mumbai and Ahmedabad, which will help us build a better relationship between the countries,” said Masafumi Shukuri, Chairman, IHRA.Kenko Sone, Minister, Embassy of Japan said, “India is a key market for Japan. Recently the 3rd Meeting of India-Japan Tourism Council summit was held in India in early January 2019 to improve our relationship with India. We have decided to promote Japan in South India and are planning to start direct flights from Chennai and Bangalore as well to Japan, very soon.”Suman Billa, Joint Secretary, Minister of Tourism, Government of India thanked the gathering and commented that he was looking forward to the inauguration of the high speed rail in India. He also expressed his sincere wish that the relationship between India and Japan should continue to flourish and grow.Mamoru Kobori, Executive Vice-President, JNTO made an extensive presentation on the JNTO website, its navigation and features. He also spoke about The Japan Specialist Program, key visuals of Japan and requested the attendees to enrol in the same.The final presentation was by, Akihiko Tamura, Former Japan Tourism Agency Commissioner who said, “The Shinkansen is the most effective mode of transport within Japan as it cuts down the travel time immensely. The high speed train between Mumbai and Ahmedabad will play a major role in Indian economy and lifestyle as well.”Several senior officials attended the seminar from the Tourism and Urban Planning and Transportation department of India and Japan.#ANA and #JAL will introduce new direct flight route from Japan to Chennai and Bengaluru, respectively.last_img read more

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first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Prince Royce to headline MLS All-Star concert by Mesfin Fekadu, The Associated Press Posted Jun 13, 2019 6:09 am PDTcenter_img NEW YORK — Latin singer Prince Royce says he’s looking forward to headlining the 2019 Major League Soccer All-Star Concert because he loves singing live. But another motive? To gain some new fans.The Dominican singer will perform at the free July 27 event in Orlando at Wall Street Plaza.Royce says: “I think for me it’s a great way to continue to gain a bigger audience. It’s a whole different type of crowd.”The concert will kick off five days of soccer festivities, with the MLS All-Star Game capping off events July 31 at Exploria Stadium.Royce released his self-titled debut in 2010, topped the Latin charts with “Corazon Sin Cara,” ”Las Cosas Pequenas” and “Darte un Beso,” and earned 13 Latin Grammy nominations.He released a new song, “Curame,” last week.Mesfin Fekadu, The Associated Presslast_img read more

March is Reading Month

first_img Categories: News 26Mar March is Reading Month! State Rep. Nancy Jenkins talked with local kids about the importance of reading during March is Reading Month. Jenkins is pictured reading to students at Michener Elementary Schools in Adrian. Jenkins also read at the Adrian Public Library.last_img

Rep Howrylak schedules office hours in Troy Clawson

first_img Categories: Howrylak News State Rep. Martin Howrylak, R-Troy, invites residents of the 41st House District to connect with him during office hours this month.“I believe talking to friends and neighbors face to face is the best way to gather ideas, answer questions and listen to suggestions,” Rep. Howrylak said. “Now that the 2017-2018 Legislative Session has begun, I look forward to connecting with residents of the 41st District to discuss the ways we can improve our state government.”Office hours will be held at the following locations:Saturday, Jan. 21, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the Troy Public Library, 510 W. Big Beaver Road.Monday, Jan. 23, from 3:30 to 5 p.m. at Blair Memorial Library, 416 N. Main St. in Clawson.No appointment is necessary. Residents unable to attend office hours may contact Rep. Howrylak’s office by phone toll free at 1-877-248-0001, or by email at MartinHowrylak@house.mi.gov.### 05Jan Rep. Howrylak schedules office hours in Troy, Clawsonlast_img read more

Rep Canfield sets office hours for Sebewaing Caro

first_img14Feb Rep. Canfield sets office hours for Sebewaing, Caro ### Categories: Canfield News,Newscenter_img State Rep. Edward J. Canfield, D.O., will host local office hours in Sebewaing and Caro within the next few weeks.The details:3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24 at Sebewaing Village Hall located at 222 N. Center St. in Sebewaing.4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, March 3 at the Caro Area District Library located at 840 W. Frank St. in Caro.“This is a good opportunity to meet and talk about the issues that are most important in Huron and Tuscola counties,” Canfield said.No appointment is necessary.Canfield, of Sebewaing, is in his second term as a state representative.For those unable to attend, you may contact Canfield’s office any time at 517-373-0476 or through email at EdwardCanfield@house.mi.gov.last_img read more