The Patriots and Eagles will square off in Super Bowl 52

first_imgAnd, with the game — and the season — possibly on the line, the Patriots star came up big again.“I’ve had a lot worse,” Brady said. “I didn’t know that on Wednesday. It was a crazy injury. Wednesday, Thursday, Friday was a little scary. Then I started getting some confidence and today we did just enough to win.”Brady finished 26 of 38 for 290 yards and two touchdowns to Amendola.It’s the eighth Super Bowl appearance for Brady and coach Bill Belichick, who have won five times — including last year’s 34-28 overtime rally against the Falcons.“It’s pretty amazing,” Brady said. “Just to be on a team that wins these kinds of games, it’s just a great accomplishment.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Foles threw for 352 yards and three touchdowns, showing poise and moxie in going 26 for 33.The Vikings were hoping to become the first NFL team to serve as host to a Super Bowl in its own stadium, but they followed up their “Minneapolis Miracle ” with a “Flop in Philly.”So, they’ll clear out their lockers long before the Eagles and Patriots and their fans take over U.S. Bank Stadium for Super Bowl 52 in two weeks.Oddsmakers like the chances of Brady winning a sixth Super Bowl ring, making the Patriots nearly a touchdown favorite to beat the Eagles.The Patriots and Eagles, who last won an NFL title in 1960, several years before the first Super Bowl, met in the Super Bowl after the 2004 season with the Patriots prevailing 24-21.ADVERTISEMENT Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Michael Porter Jr. stays patient as playing time increases OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours MOST READ Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, center, carries the trophy between quarterback Tom Brady, left, and safety Patrick Chung as they leave the field after the AFC championship NFL football game against the Jacksonville Jaguars, Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018, in Foxborough, Mass. The Patriots won 24-20. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)Tom Brady and the New England Patriots are going back to the Super Bowl in search of a sixth title.They’ll face a Philadelphia Eagles team looking for their first Lombardi Trophy.ADVERTISEMENT Hours after Brady’s game-winning 4-yard TD pass to Danny Amendola with 2:48 remaining in Foxborough, the Eagles won for the fourth time in five tries under Foles.It started out ominously, however.The Vikings celebrated Kyle Rudolph’s 25-yard touchdown catch from Case Keenum on their opening drive by mimicking the Olympic sport of curling for their TD celebration.It was the Eagles who had all the fun after that.Patrick Robinson’s spectacular 50-yard interception return got Philadelphia started. Then Foles and his offense tore up the league’s stingiest scoring defense, with long TD throws to Alshon Jeffery and Torrey Smith. LeGarrette Blount had an 11-yard scoring run when things were decided in the first half, and the Eagles were headed to an NFL title game the Vikings (14-4) hoped to be in at their own stadium.“You know everyone was against us,” Foles said. “Coming out here and stick together and (we) come away with an amazing victory against a great team.”Blake Bortles and the stingy Jaguars (12-7) led New England 20-10 early in the fourth quarter, but couldn’t hold against the defending champions.The NFL’s second-ranked defense kept Brady and the Patriots at bay for most of the game, but lost linebacker Myles Jack and defensive tackle Marcell Dareus on consecutive plays on New England’s winning drive.It was New England’s 13th win in 14 games since their 2-2 start. Their only stumble since September was a 27-20 loss at the Dolphins on Dec. 11.Brady, wearing a black bandage on his right hand after needing stitches to close a cut that happened on a play during practice earlier in the week, showed no signs of being hampered.center_img Brady led the Patriots (15-3) back from a 10-point, fourth-quarter deficit to beat the Jacksonville Jaguars 24-20 in the AFC championship game Sunday.Starting his 36th playoff game, Brady shook off an injury to his right hand and the loss of top target Rob Gronkowski to rally the Patriots to their record 10th Super Bowl appearance.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkThe Patriots will try to match the Pittsburgh Steelers’ six Super Bowl trophies when they face the Eagles (15-3) on Feb. 4 in Minneapolis.Nick Foles, the backup QB who was thrust into the starting role when Carson Wentz blew out his left knee last month, led the Philadelphia to a 38-7 rout of the Minnesota Vikings in the NFC championship game. Almazan vows to comeback stronger after finals heartbreak OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Newsome sets focus on helping Bolts open new PBA season on right track Blood, goals for Ronaldo as Madrid scores 7 to end poor run Nonito Donaire vs Naoya Inoue is BWAA 2019 Fight of the Year LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

Quota reform leader Rashed on fresh 10day remand

first_imgRashed KhanA Dhaka court has placed quota reform leader Rashed Khan on a fresh 10-day remand in two separate cases.One of the cases is under the ICT act and the other is for attack on Dhaka University’s vice-chancellor’s residence.Dhaka’s additional chief metropolitan magistrate Muhammad Asaduzzaman Nur ordered the remand fresh after his five-day remand ended in an ICT case on Sunday.The Detective Branch (DB) investigation officers of two cases sought 10-day remand in each case to interrogate Rashed while the court put him on 5-day remand in each case.Inspector Rafiqul Islam, also investigation officer of the cases, told the court that the transaction of Tk 700,000 was found in Rashed’s account during the street agitations of quota reform.In defence, Rashed’s lawyer told the court that protesting university students sent him the money even at an amount of Tk 100 for bearing the expenses of banners, festoons and renting microphones and so on.  Police arrested Rashed, joint convener of Bangladesh General Students Rights Protection Council, the platform demanding civil service quota reforms on 1 July from his Bhashantek residence.last_img read more

Kolkata Police initiates drive to spread awareness on ATM fraud

first_imgKolkata: Besides carrying out a probe to arrest the people behind the case of ATM fraud, Kolkata Police has initiated a drive to makecommon people aware of information regarding the crime to avoid such incidents in future.Kolkata Police has taken several initiatives to make people aware of the same, which includes sharing messages and videos on social networking sites.According to a senior police officer, the stress has been given on campaigning on social media, as mostly youngsters use the online mode of monetary transaction. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe Bank Fraud section of Kolkata Police’s Detective Department has prepared a video and uploaded it on its Facebook page on Friday, with detailed information on what a person should do to avoid falling prey to such crimes.It may be mentioned that recently, around 80 complaints were lodged with the police, alleging unauthorised withdrawal of money from various bank accounts. Investigation has revealed that money from ATM counters was withdrawn after cloning debit cards of several different bank account holders. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThe police have advised not to use unmanned ATM counters. At the same time, a user also needs to ensure that only one person remains inside an ATM counter at a time and details of debit cards should not be shared with anyone.Moreover, one should not seek help of any unknown person while using an ATM.Most importantly, the police have also advised people to be alert while swiping debit cards in an ATM machine and keying in the password for a transaction. One must not leave an ATM counter immediately if the machine gets disabled during an ongoing transaction.The police have also urged people to be alert while making online payment and one should prefer the use of personal computers for the same. In case of any trouble, people can also seek help of the police on their helpline number 8585063104.last_img read more

Suicide attempt in Kolkata Metro

first_imgKolkata: A young man attempted suicide by jumping in front of a Metro train here on Wednesday, causing brief disruption to Metro services, an official said. The youth was rushed to the R.G. Kar Medical College and Hospital for treatment. “There has been a suicide attempt in Dumdum station,” Kolkata Metro said. The Metro service was partially disrupted between Dumdum and Girish Park stations for nearly 40 minutes.last_img

Your PC in 2008 and Beyond

first_img Brought to you by PCWorld The world of science fiction is rapidly becoming fact, from tabletops that charge your laptop wirelessly to wall-mounted PCs that recognize your face and gestures. Thanks to breakthroughs in miniaturization, you’ll be able to tuck products into your pocket that wouldn’t have fit into your briefcase a few years ago, such as projectors and photo printers. The next generation of Internet technology will change everything from TV to Coke machines. And standard computer building blocks are growing ever more powerful, as processor makers squeeze more cores onto each chip and drive makers pack more bits into each platter–guaranteeing that even ordinary PCs of the future will be anything but ordinary.In the pages that follow, we spotlight a dozen major innovations, from ones right around the corner to a few that won’t show up until at least 2012. On multiple fronts, the future you’ve been waiting for has almost arrived. Here’s what you need to know to prepare for it.Kiss Your Power Cord Good-ByeYou hardly think twice about connecting your wireless laptop to the Internet, but you still have to fumble for a power cord when your battery runs out. How quaint. Soon all those cumbersome power bricks will be just a footnote in your grandchildren’s history books, as wireless charging comes to market.What is it? Currently two ways to accomplish wireless charging exist. Inductive charging works by matching the resonance of the charging pad’s electromagnetic field to that of the battery, allowing the battery to charge over a small physical gap. In contrast, conductive charging passes electricity directly between two surfaces in contact. Which method will win out is not yet clear, but in either case you’ll be able to simply place your laptop, phone, and music player onto a universal wireless charging pad that will immediately begin juicing them up.When is it coming? Next year both inductive and conductive charging technologies will emerge onto the market, but most devices will require a $30 adapter to work with them. WildCharge expects to roll out its first conductive-charging notebook product (paired with a compatible notebook) in time for 2008’s back-to-school season, while eCoupled is pushing to get its inductive technology into cars, countertops, and desk surfaces by 2009. Look for wireless charging to become commonplace in 2010, after major phone and laptop vendors sign on to support it.Print From Anywhere (and Anything)Forget about running home to print out your photos or–gasp!–ordering prints online. The next generation of mobile devices will come with their own built-in printers.What is it? Zink (short for “Zero Ink”) Imaging, a spin-off of Polaroid, has been working on a new way of making photo paper. Zink paper has a crystal substrate sandwiched between its layers that colorizes as it passes through a slim-profile printer. The printers themselves are so small that you can slip one in your pocket, and they can easily be built into cameras, laptops, or other devices.When is it coming? In 2008, Zink will partner with a major camera vendor (name not announced) to release the first pocket-size digital camera with a built-in printer. This early model will produce 2-by-3-inch photos. At the same time, the company will begin selling a tiny handheld printer (probably for about $99) for camera phones; it’ll print adhesive-backed photos that will likely grace the school binders of many eighth-graders. Two or three years after that, the technology may be integrated into laptops and other mobile devices.Great Graphics Inside”Integrated graphics” has long been synonymous with “sluggish graphics.” But soon the phrase will have a whole new meaning, thanks to new CPUs with powerful graphics hardware built in.What is it? AMD’s acquisition of ATI brought the company’s rivalry with Intel–which already made its own basic graphics chips–to a new level. Since then the two competitors each have been working to bridge the gap between CPUs and graphics processors. Building graphics-processing functionality directly into a CPU eliminates the delay you’d otherwise experience as data passes between the CPU and GPU across the system bus. Such combined CPU/GPUs will feature DirectX 10 support and acceleration for Blu-ray and HD-DVD while consuming substantially less power, requiring less space on the motherboard, and performing significantly better than most of today’s discrete graphics cards do.When is it coming? Intel plans to put its graphics-integrated Nehalem processors into production in 2008, beginning with a line of server chips. AMD intends to release its integrated Puma notebook platform about the same time. In 2009, Intel will bring its graphics-integrated chips to desktops and notebooks, while AMD’s Puma will likely reach desktops in 2010.Screens Get the BendsThe smaller and more powerful devices become, the harder they are to use. Tiny screens just don’t cut it when you want to do real work. But if your phone or PDA came with a large roll-out display, you could work in comfort without sacrificing portability. That’s where flexible polymers will come in.What is it? Display manufacturers make traditional LCD screens by sandwiching liquid crystals between layers of glass and then zapping them with electricity. Replacing that glass with plastic makes things a little more malleable. Initially developed by E Ink and Philips, so-called electronic paper compresses organic light-emitting diode (OLED) crystals between very thin layers of polymer, allowing for tremendous flexibility. Unlike conventional LCD screens, such ultrathin displays are completely shatterproof, and can even be rolled up into tight spools. The result is a wide-screen monitor that you can carry in your pocket and use anywhere. Better still, such screens will be cheaper and easier to manufacture than today’s flat panels–they’ll simply be printed directly onto sheets of plastic.When is it coming? First-generation flexible displays are already here–they’re just not that flexible yet. E Ink’s electronic paper can be found in such nonflexible products as the $300 Sony Reader and the $130 Motorola Motofone F3. The first actually rollable displays, created by the labs of Philips’s Holland-based spin-off Polymer Vision, will reach the market in 2008: A cell phone from Telecom Italia will carry the world’s first Polymer Vision roll-up display. Currently under wraps, the phone (pricing not yet available) is expected to offer a 5-inch, 320-by-240-pixel, monochrome rollable display. By 2010, Polymer Vision expects to market larger color displays with much higher resolution.The First Real Net PhonesSimple wireless calling satisfied users during the first generation of cell phones, but the second generation (2G) made things more interesting with the introduction of SMS messaging and WAP Internet browsing. 2.5G added pictures and video, but at speeds that feel more like dial-up than broadband. (That’s the main problem with the iPhone’s data service.) With 3G, higher-bandwidth connections have made 2.5G’s multimedia capabilities palatable. 4G will be a whole lot cooler.What is it? The fundamental difference between 4G and 3G is the way in which the networks will be switched. Until now, most phone networks (except for VoIP) have been circuit switched, meaning a dedicated circuit is activated between the callers. This outdated method puts voice calls in a category all their own, distinct from data connections, and prevents cell phones from transmitting voice calls and data simultaneously. 4G networks will be IP switched, just like all the traffic on the Internet. That not only means that you’ll be able to talk and text at the same time, but also that your 4G device will be able to do far more on the network than it can today. IP-switched cellular networks will work more as ISPs do, allowing for greater flexibility in running data applications. Just about any device–from a phone to a laptop to a Coke machine–will be able to connect to the network, and you’ll be able to do just about anything with it. Another result of this flexibility: Wireless carriers will likely be forced to loosen their iron grip on the services customers can use over their networks, giving everyone more freedom to communicate from the road.When is it coming? The four major U.S. wireless carriers are just scratching the surface of what their 3G networks can do, and most consumers seem uninterested in more-advanced data streaming. But the underlying technology for 4G networks, WiMax, exists now and is slowly growing in large enterprise networks and telecom companies. WiMax itself is not a cellular technology, however, and before a fourth-gen cellular network can evolve, the industry will need to find a new telecommunications protocol to base it on. As business users increase their demand for high-end wireless data services, cellular carriers will begin to deploy networks and devices that deliver 4G service. We expect the first handsets and data cards to hit the market in 2011.Enter the Octagon CPURegardless of what Moore’s Law has to say, there’s not much point in increasing processor speeds or doubling the bit paths in a CPU if the system bus can’t carry the traffic anyway. Since problems with transistors leaking current also worsen as clock speeds increase and CPUs shrink, both AMD and Intel have decided to focus on increasing the number of processor cores on a chip instead of increasing processor speeds.What is it? The centerpiece of any given CPU is the processor core, which is responsible for the actual calculations that make all of your software run. Placing multiple cores on a single chip dramatically increases the number of calculations that can be performed, without having to raise the clock speed of the chip itself. By keeping clock speeds relatively low while increasing the number of calculations performed simultaneously, chip makers overcome the inevitable overheating problems associated with faster clock speeds. And the more cores a manufacturer crams onto a single chip, the faster the CPU can go. The performance boost isn’t one-to-one, however: Intel’s four-core 2.66-GHz Core 2 Quad Q6700 performs just 26 percent faster than its same-speed, two-core Core 2 Duo E6700 on certain applications, according to the company (see the results of PC World tests). So while you will see improvement with eight-core CPUs, the speedup won’t be as dramatic as it might sound.When is it coming? Before AMD can start selling eight-core chips for the desktop, it needs to get its quad-core Phenom chips to market in 2008. Intel has been selling quad-core desktop processors for about a year now, and it has announced eight-core chips for servers in 2008. Expect OctoCore–or whatever the company ends up calling it–to come to desktops in 2010.Put Your TV AnywhereDespite the wireless revolution happening all around your home, your high-def television remains shamefully hard-wired in place. Wouldn’t it be great if you could put your TV anywhere you wanted, without worrying about where the cable jack was, and still get top-notch video quality? Soon you’ll be able to do just that.What is it? Wireless High-Definition Interface (WHDI) is a cable-free replacement for HDMI that uses a 5-GHz radio transmitter to send an uncompressed 1080p, 30-fps high-def video signal from a WHDI-equipped DVD player, game console, or set-top box, for example, to a WHDI-equipped TV across a distance of up to 100 feet. Because the WHDI signal is compatible with HDMI, you’ll be able to buy HDMI wireless modems for your existing entertainment gear–and that means you can finally rearrange your furniture the way you’d really like it, without having to run additional cables through your walls.When is it coming? Amimon, which manufactures the WHDI chip set, released the technology to electronics makers at the end of August. Now the race is on to bring WHDI to market. TV makers have already begun demoing new wireless-equipped HDTV models at trade shows, and fans of bleeding-edge tech should be able to get their hands on hardware by the start of the new year. WHDI is expected to add about $200 to the cost of a new TV, so expect to pay a premium for the technology in 2008. WHDI modems for your existing hardware will likely cost $300 to $400 for a pair of adapters (you need at least two–a receiver for the TV and a transmitter for your set-top box, for example–to get started). In a few years, says Amimon vice president of marketing Noam Geri, costs should drop to about $10 for inclusion in a TV and $60 for the adapters.Five Terabytes per DriveEven if you’re not a digital pack rat, you probably still manage to cram a lot of data onto your hard drive. Digital photos, movies, music, and overflowing e-mail folders can pile on the gigabytes before you know it. But don’t worry: Way bigger hard drives are on the horizon.What is it? Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording, or HAMR (and a nearly identical technology called Thermally Assisted Magnetic Recording), uses lasers to heat the surface of a drive’s platters, making it possible to pack a terabyte of data onto a single square inch of drive surface, roughly twice the current limit. As the drive’s read/write head goes about its business, it briefly fires its laser at the surface, destabilizing the iron-platinum particles for reading and writing. With the platter heated, the read/write head can manipulate the surface on a very fine scale–in just tens of nanometers–letting it cram enormous amounts of information into a small space. A few nanoseconds after the work is done, the surface cools for long-term stability. The way data is organized on a disc will change, as well: Rather than having arbitrarily arranged disk sectors, HAMR drives will work with the natural grain of the disk surface, organizing data into self-arranging magnetic arrays that allow the creation of a single bit of data on every grain of the platter’s surface.When is it coming? HAMR is still very much a research project, but it should be coming to market in the next several years. Seagate expects to introduce 5TB HAMR hard drives by 2011, with capacities of up to 37.5TB to follow a few years after that.A Better InternetTCP/IP, the technology on which the entire Internet is based, is no spring chicken. The current version of the Internet protocol, IPv4, has been around for more than 25 years. The old technology suffers from some serious limitations–including a shortage of addresses for all the computers that use it. Internet Protocol version 6 will change all that.What is it? Unlike IPv4, which uses 32-bit addresses like 155.54.210.63, IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses like 2001:0ba0:01e0:d001:0000:0000:d0f0:0010. This small, simple change permits every person in the world–and even every computer in the world–to have a unique IP address. In addition, IPv6 features network-layer encryption and authentication, enabling secure communications between parties.When is it coming? IPv6 is here right now, and has been for several years, but almost nobody is using it yet because the hardware needed for it remains more expensive than that for IPv4, and few network administrators are trained to manage it. However, the United States government has declared that it will move all of its networks to IPv6 by the summer of 2008, which even at government speeds means the technology should arrive in time to pick up the slack when the pool of available addresses runs out around March 2011. The depletion of addresses should also induce your ISP to update its network before long.A PC in Every SurfaceThough it seems second nature to us now, the idea of manipulating images on a screen by moving around an input device–a mouse–on the desk was revolutionary when Douglas Engelbart introduced it in 1964. But as well as it works, the mouse is still a surrogate for a far more natural human interface, the fingertip. Over the next few years, a new category of PCs will put your fingers in control.What is it? Tabletop computing (aka surface computing) gets back to basics by letting you gather around a table with some friends for some good old-fashioned interactivity. Accepting a variety of input types simultaneously, tabletop PCs allow multiple users to work with data projected onto the surface of the table by touching on-screen objects with their fingertips. Many companies are working on tabletop computing technologies, but two of the leading efforts are Microsoft’s camera-driven Surface PC and Mitsubishi Electronics Research Labs’ RF-driven DiamondTouch. Surface PCs use rear projection to present an image on the surface of the table from inside, while five infrared cameras in the table track finger movements on the screen. DiamondTouch projects the image from above the table and uses capacitive coupling (like that employed in laptop touchpads) to follow your fingertips–with this design, though, you create shadows when you touch it.When is it coming? MERL’s DiamondTouch is still predominantly a research project, but Microsoft’s Surface PC will arrive this year at a hotel, casino, or cellular store near you. First-generation Surface PCs will be strictly for showcasing in public locations, but Microsoft expects to offer a conference-room version for businesses by 2010. Home users will get them three to five years from now. Eventually, says Microsoft, you can expect to have Surface PCs built into countertops, mirrors, or just about any other flat spot in your home.Put Your Data in the Fast LaneAs CPUs grow more powerful and graphics cards rocket toward ever higher levels of realism and detail, a significant bottleneck in your PC’s data flow remains: the system bus. When data travels through your PC, it’s the system bus–not the processor–that limits overall performance. What you need is a faster bus.What is it? PCI Express (PCIe) is the leading system bus architecture for high-end hardware such as graphics cards. The current specification, version 2.3, offers a data transfer rate of 5.2 gigabits per second. The next generation, PCI 3.0, will offer a data rate of 8 gbps. In addition to supporting much higher GPU performance, a key benefit of PCIe 3.0 may be the ability to power graphics cards directly from the system bus, rather than requiring a line into the power supply. But there’s a catch: In order to support the higher data rates, the architecture will no longer work with the older 5-volt hardware used on PCIe versions 1.1 and 2.0. Whereas PCIe 2.3 supports both 5V and 3.3V cards, PCIe 3.0 will be 3.3V only. That means most current 5V hardware will be obsolete when PCIe 3.0 debuts.When is it coming? PCI-SIG, the group that oversees PCI architecture specifications, expects to release the final PCIe 3.0 spec in 2009. PCIe 3.0 graphics cards should hit the market in 2010.Pocket PresentationsWatching video on a cell phone is a pain. Even if you find the content you want, the tiny screen makes enjoying the program difficult. Before long, however, you’ll be seeing shows right-sized again, thanks to your projector-equipped cell phone.What is it? Microvision Pico projectors employ light scanning technology to generate a complete, full-color image from a beam of light. Within the device it’s embedded in, a single red, green, or blue laser bounces off a tiny scanning mirror that oscillates vertically and horizontally to render the image pixel by pixel, producing a larger picture that projects onto a wall or other surface (as large as 120 inches, from 12 feet away in a darkened room). Controlling the scanner, the light source, and the optics is the PicoP engine, which coordinates the various components to control the intensity of each beam of light to create thousands of colors. By using a single beam of light rather than three beams, Microvision is able to make the projectors small enough to fit into cell phones without appreciably increasing the size of the phones. And the company even expects the integrated projectors to play a feature-length movie on just one cell phone charge.When is it coming? Microvision has partnered with Motorola to build Pico projectors into mobile phones, and the first projector-equipped model is expected to debut in 2009. Meanwhile, the company is designing a projector accessory for PCs and game consoles that should be available by the end of 2008. Built-in projectors can be expected to add as much as $150 to the price of a phone, while accessory projectors will likely cost around $200, says Avi Greengart, principal analyst for mobile devices at Current Analysis and editor of the Home Theater View blog.Tech Beyond 2010Gigabit Internet (2012): Dogged by the speed of your home broadband service? With a gigabit Internet connection over a fiber-optic line, you’ll be able to download the latest movies in less than a minute at speeds up to 1 gbps.Mobile fuel cells (2013): Now in development, hydrogen fuel cells will power your laptop for a week at a time using store-bought fuel cartridges.Smart homes (2014): We’ve heard for years about the smart home–a house chock-full of computer-driven appliances that cater to your every need. As homes with built-in ethernet wiring become more common in several years, central home PCs will control everything from the thermostat to the lighting to the security system.Probe storage (2015): Code-named Millipede, the probe storage system being developed by IBM will use atomic force microscopy (think itsy-bitsy dots) to store more than a terabyte of data per square inch on a polymer surface. An array of thousands of little probes will be able to read and write large amounts of that data far more quickly than today’s drives can.Nano lightning systems (2015): It has “lightning” right in the name, so you know it’s cool, but it’s really about cooling off your hardware. Microscopic nanotubes will use an electrical charge to generate tiny wind currents on the surface of your chips to cool them down without the aid of fans.Hot ProductsImpatient for the future? These items are due in the next few months.Microsoft Windows Vista SP1: Early in 2008, Microsoft is expected to release its first service pack for Windows Vista. The update will likely include fixes for everything from User Account Control to DirectX 10 performance, as well as a few interface tweaks.Apple Mac OS X Leopard: It’s been a long time coming, but Apple’s latest revision of OS X, version 10.5 ($129), may be available by the time you read this. It includes an enhanced interface with a transparent menu bar, stackable menus, dynamic workspaces, and the Time Machine file-restoration tool.HP MediaSmart Server: Based on Microsoft’s Windows Home Server platform, MediaSmart Server–starting at $599 and due out late this fall–will deliver pictures, music, and movies to devices around the home.Super Talent 32GB SSD 2.5-inch SATA: The 32GB Super Talent drive is one of the first flash-based drives. But early adopters beware: The $500 price tag is likely to drop, particularly after 128GB drives from mainstream makers hit the market next year.Electronic Arts Crysis: Hitting shelves November 16, the $59 sequel to Far Cry looks to be the most visually stunning PC game ever. Developer Crytek has taken full advantage of DirectX 10 graphics technology, offering realism and detail unlike anything we’ve seen.Battles to WatchHere are the top technology fights to follow in the coming years.AMD vs. Intel: Though Intel currently has the performance edge with its Core 2 line and its quad processor, AMD will soon counter with the release of its own quad-core Phenom chips. Expect things to heat up in a big way with the release of consumer graphics-integrated CPUs in 2009.DRM vs. unrestricted access: Will user outrage prompt entertainment resellers to come up with a sensible copy-protection scheme, or will corporations overrun fair-use rights with pay-per-play media services? We’re putting our money on a compromise between the two, as some labels have already begun offering DRM-free music through iTunes and other services in response to consumer demand for more flexible formats.Windows vs. Mac vs. Linux: IDC estimates Apple’s market share at roughly 5 percent in the United States, while Linux is gaining popularity around the world, particularly with governments and educational institutions. Most estimates still peg Linux desktop users at around 1 percent of the market, but the numbers appear to be climbing. This year, Dell and Lenovo gave Linux desktop users a boost by adding to their product lines systems with Linux preinstalled.Microsoft vs. Google: Microsoft’s long-standing dominance in the office-productivity software arena is facing new threats from the likes of Google, which offers its own productivity suite–Google Docs–online. While Docs has yet to make significant inroads against Microsoft Office, Microsoft’s efforts to beat Google at its own game with Live.com have yet to bear fruit. CEO Steve Ballmer’s July announcement that Microsoft will begin shifting to a “Web-enabled desktop” in the coming years suggests that the company takes Google’s threat seriously.Overhyped TrendsHere are three allgedly hot topics we’re tired of hearing about.Microblogging: What are you doing right now? If the answer is “Washing my poodle in the kitchen sink,” we’d rather not know. With short attention spans becoming the norm, services like Twitter and Pownce probably aren’t going away anytime soon–but they’re not very useful, either.UMPCs: In 2005, Microsoft announced a bold new standard for mobile devices known as the Ultra-Mobile PC. Armed with touch screens, GPS, and Wi-Fi, these not-quite-tablet PCs were supposed to revolutionize how and where people compute. But by delivering a platform that’s too small for true productivity and too large for genuine mobility, Microsoft ensured that the UMPC was pretty much dead on arrival, and new designs have done little to arouse consumer interest–Palm recently scrapped plans for the Foleo, a device with similar dimensions.Kitchen PCs: For a while now, certain trade shows have been annual love-ins for companies hyping a future full of household appliances with built-in computers. In all these years, however, the best thing we’ve seen is LG’s LSC27990, a $4000 icebox with a 15-inch LCD screen crammed into the door. It’s mildly interesting to be able to watch a ballgame or get birthday reminders and weather reports while you’re standing in front of the fridge (assuming you have a cable outlet tucked behind your appliance nook); but these overpriced, barely functional computers amount to little more than amusing proof-of-concept novelties. They’re a far cry from the true smart appliances of the future.Overdue TechAfter years of waiting for these promising technologies, we think they’re still far from mainstream.WiMax: Back in 2003, WiMax was heralded as the ultimate solution to the world’s connectivity problems, capable of covering an entire city with ubiquitous broadband. WiMax today, however, is little more than an IT backbone for long-distance line-of-sight wide-area networks, largely because it’s not very effective for the kinds of mobile devices that most people use for wireless Internet service. The basic technology of WiMax may yet evolve as part of future 4G cellular networks, but that’s still a long way off.IPTV: Oh, how we’ve hungered for the video nirvana that IPTV has been promising. But while Verizon’s FiOS TV and AT&T’s U-Verse are finally rolling out, they’ve yet to produce the amazing lineup of HD channels, on-demand shows, integrated gaming, and digital voice calling the companies claimed would come, and they’re still anything but ubiquitous. Meanwhile, digital cable has evolved enough to take some of the wind out of IPTV’s sails.RFID: If early predictions were to be believed, today you would be walking through the grocery store filling up your cart as tiny radio frequency identification (RFID) tags announced the contents of the cart and an RFID-enabled credit card automatically paid the bill. Ummm, nope. The biggest holdup has come from the very companies attempting to roll out the technology, with industry infighting over standardization keeping RFID on the shelf.Virtual reality: Second Life boasts a 3D space in which users can buy and sell property, create objects, and socialize, but its relatively crude graphics still feel more virtual than real. Virtual reality as folks imagined it in the 1990s isn’t likely to emerge until someone invents a wearable display that people will actually wear. At least we have World of Warcraft. 15+ min read The pace of everyday living may be hectic, but the pace of innovation is downright frenetic. Technologies barely imagined a few years ago are now poised to change the face of computing, as digital devices continue to burrow into every aspect of daily life. Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.center_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals September 26, 2007 Register Now »last_img read more

SXSWedu Shows 4 Ways Entrepreneurs Can Impact Education

first_imgMarch 14, 2017 A fascinating realization you make after spending a week at SXSWedu surrounded by teachers, superintendents, provosts and edtech leaders is that the conference is about so much more than education.While the thousands of attendees at the conference each bring shared passions — improving learning, strengthening education outcomes, innovating traditional systems, eating great barbecue — they also recognize the strategies and tools we need to achieve these goals can come from anywhere. The SXSWedu team also knows this, and that’s why they pack hundreds of panel discussions and presentations with thought leaders from inside and outside education. SXSWedu isn’t about insular conversations in academia; it’s about knocking down silos and bringing people together from all different disciplines to focus on how we make learning better, and more available, for everyone.Related: SXSW 2017 Photo Gallery: Our Favorite Photos (So Far)That realization should be remarkably inspiring for today’s entrepreneurs. In order to deliver the next generation of doctors, scientists, mechanics, artists, engineers, etc., education needs new ideas and technologies that span across disciplines. It’s a give-take system of innovation that makes it an exciting time to be an entrepreneur.Here’s a look at four key themes from SXSWedu that can help entrepreneurs focus and take action to enrich education.Technology as a connective forceTechnology is a leading catalyst in eroding the walls and silos that used to exist in education. When I was a student, written correspondence between pen pals far outweighed the nascent connections I had over AIM. Now students and teachers can connect instantaneously and share resources via Skype, FaceTime, Slack and scores of applications, both purpose-built and borrowed intent, to drive dialogue and innovation forward.Entrepreneurs that can find new ways to harness the connectivity provided by these technologies have an opportunity to thrive. One finalist in SXSWedu’s launch competition that stood out in this regard was TeachersConnect, a tool that promises to “lay the groundwork for a world in which teaching is no longer a solo activity.” TeachersConnect is an app that empowers teachers to share ideas, resources and best practices constantly and across geographies to best inform their individual efforts. When a teacher using this network has a question, she can quickly get an answer or new ideas to help students.Apps and technologies that help educators best connect with both peers and thought leaders in real-time will continue to be valuable in the future. It’s an opportunity for entrepreneurs who can take our ever-growing mobile communication tools and leverage them strategically.Related: SXSW: Billionaire Chris Sacca on Tech’s New Business BlindspotRelevancy. Relevancy. Relevancy.A common theme heard at SXSWedu is the need for education to be relevant. Graduating 200 dental hygienists into a marketplace only able to support 30 of them is an example where bigger isn’t always better in education. This need for relevancy is another opportunity for entrepreneurs — what tools and technologies can you create that help educators understand the workforce needs of tomorrow?SXSWedu’s employability track featured a great presentation on this topic, highlighting how job growth in healthcare will outpace overall job growth in our country for the foreseeable future. On a micro level, this is represented in Chicago, where there is a gap between the current market of qualified healthcare professionals and the projected 84,000 healthcare jobs set to come on-line in the Chicago region over the next decade. It’s a statistic that led Malcolm X College to build a new health sciences campus with a virtual hospital specifically equipped to help Chicago-area students take these jobs.Related: SXSW 2017: There’s a Scary Reason You’ll Start Taking Digital Privacy SeriouslyMore institutions in K-12 and higher education are set to bring sharper focus to ensuring the education experiences they deliver line up with employment needs. Entrepreneurs can play a role here on numerous fronts: creating tools that help analyze and predict job trends, developing technologies to better train students to take these jobs or apps that make it easier for educators to connect with professional in leading sectors.Learning by designFor the first time this year, SXSWedu incorporated Learn by Design, a new competition program focused on the design of physical learning spaces and how they impact learning outcomes. The launch of this program is evidence that leaders recognize the growing importance design plays to advancing learning.The program yielded three winners from hundreds of entries: Citti Academy in Los Angeles, the Baltimore County Public Schools’ Mobile Innovation Lab and Lassonde Studios at the University of Utah. All of these projects can point to design strategies that are helping their students succeed. Design was also at the forefront of numerous other discussions during the conference, including a look at Philadelphia University’s NEXUS Learning Hubs — novel learning spaces that are thoughtfully designed to act as the catalyst for pedagogical training, nurturing and experimentation. The NEXUS hubs allow for seamless transitions to different modes of active and engaged learning and optimize collaborative involvement.With design taking a more central role in education, entrepreneurs can make an impact in numerous ways. While schools, colleges and universities are all taking unique approaches to leveraging design, the spaces they create almost always embrace flexibility, technology, collaboration and idea-sharing. Entrepreneurs should focus on how they can introduce furniture, tools and resources that extend these spatial qualities and further empower students.Related: SXSW 2017: The Simple Lessons Reshaping the Cities and Cars of the FutureSeamless job trainingEducation is just beginning to scratch the surface of how technologies like augmented reality and holographics can improve learning. For example, Microsoft recently launched HoloLens, the first self-contained, holographic computer enabling people to engage with digital content and interact with holograms in the world around them. That’s fascinating and powerful, but educators need help understanding how to best leverage it.Creating content and applications that turn the potential of tools like VR and holographics into results should be a major focus for entrepreneurs. It was inspiring to see LlamaZoo as part of the SXSWedu launch competition; it’s a tool that marries highly interactive 3D, augmented and virtual reality, and modern teaching techniques such as adaptive quizzing and spaced repetition to create more collaborative and useful student experiences. More tools like this can prove intensely valuable for education moving forward if and when entrepreneurs deliver them.Amidst the wealth of thought leadership and innovation that defined SXSWedu, these four themes stood out. To host such a rich discussion on education, SXSWedu invited teachers, journalists, scientists, architects, healthcare professionals and more to be part of it — an inspiring reminder that education touches everything. Entrepreneurs should be motivated to launch companies and products that further break down silos to accelerate learning and discovery. Register Now » Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 6 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more

TTAND teams up with TravelBrands to sell Disney Destinations

first_imgTags: The Travel Agent Next Door << Previous PostNext Post >> Travelweek Group TORONTO — The Travel Agent Next Door (TTAND) has announced a new long-term, preferred partnership with TravelBrands, with a special focus on growing sales with Disney Destinations.With this partnership, TravelBrands will provide support in the form of:Training: Ongoing training sessions held throughout the year on product and system training on how to easily book Disney DestinationsIncentives: Offered throughout the yearGiveaways: Pro-active trivia games that were created to keep agents engaged in Disney Destinations product knowledge with TravelBrandsMarketing: Creative marketing initiatives provided to agentsSpecialist Programs: Created to enable agents to sell Disney Destinations with confidence through TravelBrandsFams: Training fam to Disney Destinations’ headquarters in Orlando to gain firsthand experience and trainingIn 2017, TravelBrands added a Disney Destinations microsite on its travel agent platform, which Erminia Nigro, Director Sales, says allows agents to learn everything there is to know about the most popular parks, resorts and cruises.More news:  CIE Tours launches first-ever River Cruise Collection“We are providing the information for travel agents right on our platform without having to go anywhere else. All that is needed to do is a simple click on the location of interest and plan away! From accommodations to activities or general information, the microsite has all information required on Walt Disney World, Disneyland, Cruises and Aulani,” she says.Flemming Friisdahl, founder of The Travel Agent Next Door, adds: “Our partnership with TravelBrands is an important one and they have brought forward several initiatives to keep our agents focused on selling Disney Destinations throughout the year.”For more information go to thetravelagentnextdoor.ca or call (416) 367-TAND. Posted bycenter_img TTAND teams up with TravelBrands to sell Disney Destinations Tuesday, February 13, 2018 Sharelast_img read more