Under his new lifestyle brand Soori architect Soo

first_imgUnder his new lifestyle brand Soori, architect Soo K. Chan has relaunched his beachfront resort, set between a beach and rice fields in Bali’s Tabanan Regency, as the ultimate wellbeing destination.The relaunch of Soori Bali, which has just joined The Leading Hotels of the World, marks the first in a series of major developments to be rolled out under the Soori brand. Soori High Line, a residence opening in New York City’s West Chelsea, and Soori Niseko, a forthcoming ski resort in Japan, will underscore Soori’s philosophy of “living exceptionally well through holistic design”.Each of Soori Bali’s 48 private pool villas and residences are in the midst of refreshment. Soori Bali will soon introduce a new Indonesian restaurant, moored in a traditional wooden Balinese house amid the resort’s rice fields. In late 2017, Soori Bali will expand its vast helipad lawn on the 10-bedroom Soori Estate totalling 5250 square metres, culminating in the unveiling of a cantilevered platform jutting over the Indian Ocean.Soori Spa’s offerings are being expanded, in line with the resort’s vision of becoming Bali’s premier wellbeing destination. A team of onsite practitioners and visiting wellness experts will offer physical alignment and massage therapies, acupuncture, meditation, neurotherapy and longevity procedures among many other bespoke techniques, while special retreats will be hosted throughout the year by visiting international wellness experts.The EarthCheck-certified resort minimises its carbon footprint through its design as well as a host of measures including reduced energy consumption, water conservation, waste management and use of organic products.The hotel’s facilities include an infinity pool, gymnasium, library, spa, helipad, two restaurants, leisure concierge and butler service, and round-the-clock room service. The 10-room Soori Estate comes with its own infinity pool, gym, spa, kitchen, chauffeur-driven car and private butler.last_img read more

Administering nitric oxide gas after heart surgery may decrease risk of kidney

first_imgJun 22 2018Administration of nitric oxide gas during and for 24 hours following heart surgery decreased the risk of patients developing acute and chronic kidney problems, a randomized, controlled trial conducted in China found.The study, “Nitric Oxide Decreases Acute Kidney Injury and Stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease after Cardiac Surgery,” is published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.Researchers studied 244 adults in Xi’an, China, who underwent surgery to replace more than one heart valve. Because of the duration of the procedure, the patients required placement on cardiopulmonary bypass (a heart-lung machine) for at least 90 minutes.”Previous studies showed that prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass causes disruption of circulating red blood cells and the release of hemoglobin, which can cause acute kidney injury, leading to kidney failure and the need for long-term hemodialysis,” said lead study author Lorenzo Berra, MD, medical director of respiratory care at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. “We tested whether administration of nitric oxide, a gas normally produced by cells in the lining of blood vessels, might render hemoglobin ‘inert,’ thereby decreasing the risk of both acute and chronic kidney injury.”The authors found that patients who received 80 parts per million of nitric oxide during and for 24 hours after surgery were less likely to develop acute kidney injury, with a decrease from 64 percent in the placebo-treated patients to 50 percent in those who received nitric oxide.The risk of progressing to more serious kidney disease (Stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease) was also reduced at 90 days, with a decrease from 33 percent in the placebo-treated patients to 21 percent in those who received nitric oxide. After one year, 31 percent in the placebo group had serious kidney disease compared to 18 percent in the nitric oxide group.Related StoriesResearch opens possibility of developing single-dose gene therapy for inherited arrhythmiasHeart disease is still the number 1 killer in Australia, according to latest figuresArtificial intelligence can help accurately predict acute kidney injury in burn patientsThere was also a decrease in the overall mortality rate after one year, from 6 percent in the placebo group to 3 percent in the nitric oxide group. This decrease did not reach statistical significance, possibly because of the relatively small number of patients included in the study, the researchers wrote.According to the authors, several drugs have been tested and shown to be ineffective at protecting the kidneys after cardiac surgery. This is the first study to show that a pharmacological treatment can reduce acute and chronic kidney injury resulting from cardiac surgery.Importantly, the authors noted that administration of nitric oxide gas appears to be safe: nitric oxide delivery did not have to be reduced or stopped in any of the patients who received the gas.The authors caution that study results may not be generalizable to all cardiopulmonary bypass patients. In the Chinese study, all patients underwent the same type of surgery, and most of the patients were young (average age: 48) because their heart valve problems were caused by rheumatic fever. In North America and Europe, degenerative heart disease is a more common cause of valve dysfunction, and these older patients are more likely to have additional medical problems.The researchers are now conducting a similar trial at the Massachusetts General Hospital to determine whether nitric oxide provides similar benefits as those seen in the Chinese study.Compared to the younger, relatively healthy patients in the Chinese study, Dr. Berra said, “We believe that the older patients with an increased number of cardiovascular risk factors, including obesity, hypertension and diabetes, may derive even greater benefit from nitric oxide administration during and after heart surgery.”Source: http://www.thoracic.org/last_img read more