Guest speaker revealed for Donegal ETB’s Enterprise Day for Schools

first_imgSeamus McDaid of Football Special fame is the guest speaker at this year’s Donegal ETB Enterprise Day for Schools and Youthreach Centres, it has been confirmed. Now in its sixth year, the annual event for post-primary school students and Youthreach learners from across the county takes place on Wednesday 16th October in Letterkenny Institute of Technology.The aim of the event is to introduce the concept of entrepreneurship in a fun way to young people with the support of entrepreneurs and business people from across Donegal. Last year over 200 young people from seventeen schools and Youthreach centres from across the county participated.Seamus has only recently returned from the United States where he was the founder of McDaid’s Beverages USA and spent eight years there as the company’s US Business Development Manager.Having worked before this in Australia, he has now returned to Ireland to run the family business, working as the company’s Business Development Manager from their headquarters in Ramelton. He has lots of entrepreneurial experience and tips to share with the couple of hundred young people who will participate in the day.The day involves each team developing a product, from materials provided to them, on which they are judged in a Dragon’s Den-type setup.This includes pitching their product to panels of business judges. Teams are given a business mentor and an LYIT business studies student to guide them throughout the day. Seamus will speak to them about entrepreneurship success and failure.The day also includes fun activities, ice breakers and team-building games with staff from Donegal ETB’s Gartan Outdoor Education and Training Centre.Donegal ETB’s Director of Schools, Dr Martin Gormley commented: “We are delighted that Seamus has agreed to speak at our Enterprise Day this year.“This is one of Donegal ETB’s keynote events for students and learners across the county to encourage the key skill of entrepreneurship in a creative and fun way. “We really appreciate Seamus and a host of other entrepreneurs and business people giving up their time on the day to support the young people.”Last year’s winners of the Enterprise Day was St Catherine’s Vocational School in Killybegs, while other previous winners have included Finn Valley College, Carndonagh Community School and Deele College.Dr Isobel Cunningham, lecturer in LYIT’s Department of Business and one of the organising group members said, “LYIT is delighted to be involved with Donegal ETB in supporting this exciting event for Donegal’s young people again this year.”Guest speaker revealed for Donegal ETB’s Enterprise Day for Schools was last modified: September 16th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

‘Delhi Police threatened me with the death penalty’

first_imgThe controversy surrounding South African cricketer Herschelle Gibbs’s autobiography – To the Point – continues to reveal new facets regarding his chequered career, including the infamous match fixing episode when he was interrogated by the Delhi Police in 2006.In the book, Gibbs reveals that during the interrogation, one of the commissioners, described as ‘a tough-looking old Sikh gentleman’, tried to intimidate him by mentioning ‘death penalty’.After refusing to be part of South African squads for the India tour on a few occasions fearing arrest, Gibbs, with his lawyer Peter Whelan, finally travelled to the country in 2006 to face grilling by a four-member panel. The South African wrote in his book – To the Point – about his trip to India to face questioning after telephonic conversations of the then captain Hansie Cronje with an Indian bookmaker were intercepted by Delhi Police in 2000, sparking off a global match-fixing controversy.In one of the chapters, Gibbs writes that one of the interrogating the officer said: “Sir, you had better come clean. We still have the death penalty here [in India]. Needless to say, Peter jumped right in with both feet and threatened to end the meeting right there if they tried this kind of intimidating tactic,” Gibbs wrote.Gibbs also reveals he had to apologise to the then Joint Commissioner of Police (Crime) Ranjit Narayan, who is currently the Special Commissioner of the Crime Branch, for having publicly called him ‘hard-a**ed’ some time before.When contacted, Narayan said that he had not read the book yet but had come to know about it from the internet. “I came to know about it today and read about it on the internet. Yes he did apologise for making such statements during the interrogation. What can I say if he has mentioned that episode today. He apologised and it was over that time,” Narayan told MAIL TODAY.advertisementNarayan, however, refuted Gibbs claims on the death penalty. The ‘tough looking gentleman’ has been referred to AS Cheema, who was Deputy Commissioner of the Crime branch in 2006.”That is false. No officer told Gibbs what he has referred in the book. The interrogation went on for four hours but I don’t remember any officer telling him anything of that sort,” said Narayan.In the book that was released in Johannesburg on Monday, Gibbs also disclosed that he had indulged in ‘tonsil hockey’ (deep kissing) with a German girl at the Taj Hotel the night before being questioned by the Delhi Police. Gibbs admitted he was drunk and he could not even remember anything the next morning. “Our flight to India was via Dubai and Peter spent about eight of those hours coaching me on the upcoming grilling I was sure to get,” Gibbs wrote. “Remember that the King Commission (in South Africa) had been five years earlier and we knew the Indians would be looking for any discrepancies between my testimony back then and what I would have to say to them now.”I think the Indians were pretty taken aback when I turned up with both my lawyer and the High Commissioner [in New Delhi]. I was hustled inside to see (Commissioner) KK Paul, who had been my Indian nemesis for the past six years. ‘Hello, Mr Gibbs,” he said. ‘I’m a big fan of yours.’ Not exactly the reception I had been expecting from him!”A four-man panel, headed by the joint commissioner of the Delhi Police Crime Branch, Ranjit Narayan, bombarded me with questions for about three hours. It was a hostile situation, make no mistake, and it wasn’t helped either by the fact that I’d publicly said Narayan was hard-a**ed. The Commissioner wasn’t happy about that at all, and he even brought it up during the questioning. I had to apologise. His a**e was not so hard after all,” Gibbs says in the book.Narayan also denied the reports released by media houses then that he along with Gibbs and police Commissioner KK Paul had met for a lunch a few days after the interrogation was over. Recalling the interrogation, Narayan said: “The interrogation session went on for four hours and we treated him like any other chap we call for questioning. It happened a long time back but I still remember he answered all our queries and the interrogation went peacefully.”- With agency inputslast_img read more