Tracking diseases

first_imgTracking domestic animalsThe system will track cattle, bison, hogs, sheep,goats, horses, poultry, game birds, farmed fish and domesticdeer, elk, llamas, alpacas, ostriches and emus, McPeake said.It isn’t a knee-jerk reaction to last year’s mad cow case, hesaid.”The industry and government have been working on this system fora couple of years,” he said. “Now it will be phased in over threeyears.”The USAIP Web site reportsthat the system’sfirst phase, premises ID by state, should be complete this year. Based on public health system”This system is based on the Georgia Division of Public Health’shuman disease system, which tracks diseases like AIDS andtuberculosis,” said Nelwyn Stone, assistant state veterinarian.”Farmers and veterinarians will use RADS to report animaldiseases.”Stone said a farmer, county extension agent or veterinarian canaccess the system through the Web and quickly report an animaldisease case.”Farmers usually call their vet first. Then the vet calls us,”Stone said. “If it’s a foreign animal disease, like bluetongue orfoot-and-mouth disease, we inform the (U.S. Department ofAgriculture) and a veterinary medical officer reports to thefarm.”The new, computer-driven system should make this quicker, Stonesaid. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaIn the wake of the nation’s scareover its first case of bovinespongiform encephalopathy, also known as “mad cow disease,” stateand federal officials are stepping up measures to track foreignanimal diseases.In Georgia, the Reportable Animal Disease System is beingincorporated into the Georgia Agricultural Information Sharingand Analysis Center network. RADS will allow state officials tomonitor animal disease across the state. Federal program will track originThe federal government is working on the U.S. AnimalIdentification Plan, a system that will track animals back totheir origin.”It … can identify all animals and premises potentially exposedto an animal with a foreign animal disease within 48 hours ofdiscovery,” said Charles McPeake, an animal scientist with theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.”Maintaining the health and economic viability of U.S. animalagriculture is critical to the industry and the safety of ourfood supply,” he said.The federal system will enable foreign animal disease outbreaksto be quickly contained, McPeake said. It will help meetshoppers’ demands, too, for foods that can be traced to theirsource.Using the federal system, officials will be able to trace ananimal back to its farm and everywhere in-between. It’s stillbeing developed. But when it’s in place, it will require thatanimals get an identification number at birth. Keeping diseases contained”When an animal disease is reported, we want to get our stateveterinary officials out to the farm quickly,” she said. “If it’sonly on one farm, we want to keep it on one farm.”In July, Stone will meet with counterparts in other states todiscuss each state’s system.”The overall goal is to make it easier for farmers, farm workers,lab workers and veterinarians to report suspect diseases,” Stonesaid. “It will keep animals in our state safe and ensure diseaseslike avian flu don’t spread if they do occur.”RADS was created by the Georgia Department of Agriculture. It’sfunded by the Georgia Division of Public Health. The GeorgiaEmergency Management Agency will integrate the technology intotheir monitoring systems.Stone said she hopes the system will go on-line this spring.Computer problems, though, could push it back to the fall.last_img

first_imgTracking domestic animalsThe system will track cattle, bison, hogs, sheep,goats, horses, poultry, game birds, farmed fish and domesticdeer, elk, llamas, alpacas, ostriches and emus, McPeake said.It isn’t a knee-jerk reaction to last year’s mad cow case, hesaid.”The industry and government have been working on this system fora couple of years,” he said. “Now it will be phased in over threeyears.”The USAIP Web site reportsthat the system’sfirst phase, premises ID by state, should be complete this year. Based on public health system”This system is based on the Georgia Division of Public Health’shuman disease system, which tracks diseases like AIDS andtuberculosis,” said Nelwyn Stone, assistant state veterinarian.”Farmers and veterinarians will use RADS to report animaldiseases.”Stone said a farmer, county extension agent or veterinarian canaccess the system through the Web and quickly report an animaldisease case.”Farmers usually call their vet first. Then the vet calls us,”Stone said. “If it’s a foreign animal disease, like bluetongue orfoot-and-mouth disease, we inform the (U.S. Department ofAgriculture) and a veterinary medical officer reports to thefarm.”The new, computer-driven system should make this quicker, Stonesaid. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaIn the wake of the nation’s scareover its first case of bovinespongiform encephalopathy, also known as “mad cow disease,” stateand federal officials are stepping up measures to track foreignanimal diseases.In Georgia, the Reportable Animal Disease System is beingincorporated into the Georgia Agricultural Information Sharingand Analysis Center network. RADS will allow state officials tomonitor animal disease across the state. Federal program will track originThe federal government is working on the U.S. AnimalIdentification Plan, a system that will track animals back totheir origin.”It … can identify all animals and premises potentially exposedto an animal with a foreign animal disease within 48 hours ofdiscovery,” said Charles McPeake, an animal scientist with theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.”Maintaining the health and economic viability of U.S. animalagriculture is critical to the industry and the safety of ourfood supply,” he said.The federal system will enable foreign animal disease outbreaksto be quickly contained, McPeake said. It will help meetshoppers’ demands, too, for foods that can be traced to theirsource.Using the federal system, officials will be able to trace ananimal back to its farm and everywhere in-between. It’s stillbeing developed. But when it’s in place, it will require thatanimals get an identification number at birth. Keeping diseases contained”When an animal disease is reported, we want to get our stateveterinary officials out to the farm quickly,” she said. “If it’sonly on one farm, we want to keep it on one farm.”In July, Stone will meet with counterparts in other states todiscuss each state’s system.”The overall goal is to make it easier for farmers, farm workers,lab workers and veterinarians to report suspect diseases,” Stonesaid. “It will keep animals in our state safe and ensure diseaseslike avian flu don’t spread if they do occur.”RADS was created by the Georgia Department of Agriculture. It’sfunded by the Georgia Division of Public Health. The GeorgiaEmergency Management Agency will integrate the technology intotheir monitoring systems.Stone said she hopes the system will go on-line this spring.Computer problems, though, could push it back to the fall.last_img

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